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General Information

GDP USD24.984bn (World ranking 96, World Bank 2012)
Population 21.7 million (World ranking 54, World Bank 2012)
Form of state Multiparty Presidential Republic
Head of government Paul BIYA
Next elections Presidential October 2018, legislative September 2018

CURRENT LOCAL TIME

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Data Protection

Data Protection Laws Not Found

(Decree No. 2006/088 of 11 March 2006 relating to the setting up, organisation and functioning of the National Anti-Corruption Commission)

Art. 1: (1) A National Anti-Corruption Commission hereinafter referred to as “the Commission” abbreviated “NACC” is set up.

(2) The Commission shall be placed under the authority of the President of the Republic.

(3) Its headquarters shall be in Yaounde.

Art. 2: (1) The Commission shall be an independent public body charged with contributing to the fight against corruption.

(2) In that capacity, it shall notably be responsible for:

– monitoring and evaluating the effective implementation of the governmental anti-corruption plan;

– gathering, centralising and analysing denunciations and information forwarded to it in respect of corrupt practices, deeds and facts and similar offences;

– conducting all studies and investigations and opposing any measures aimed and forestalling or curbing corruption;

– carrying out, where necessary, on-the-spot controls of the execution of projects, as well as the evaluation of conditions of public contract awards;

– disseminating and popularising anti-corruption instruments; identifying the causes of corruption and proposing to the relevant authorities measures likely to lead to its eradication from all public or semi-public services;

– performing any other duties assigned it by the President of the Republic.

Art. 3: (1) The Commission may initiate proceedings for any corrupt practices, deeds and facts and similar offences with which it is acquainted.

(2) Any natural person or corporate body may also lodge with the Commission, any complaint or denunciation in respect of corrupt deeds and facts.

(3) The Commission shall be bound to protect its sources of information. Provided that where the malicious intent of the informer is established, the Commission shall disclose the source concerned at the behest of the court.

Chapter II Organisation

Art. 4: The Commission shall comprise:

– the Coordination Committee;

– the Permanent Secretariat.

1 – Coordination Committee

Art. 5: Under the authority of the Commission Chairperson, the Coordination Committee shall be responsible for:

– establishing direct contacts with members of government and heads of public and semi-public services;

– authorising missions of Commissioners;

– ensuring discipline, efficiency and effectiveness of Commission members and staff;

– preparing an annual programme of activities of the Commission in accordance with its duties and ensuring the implementation thereof.

Art. 6: Besides the Chairperson and Vice-Chairman, the Coordination Committee shall comprise 9 (nine) members chosen from among personalities from administration and civil society, who have shown proof of integrity in the exercise of their duties and are of good moral conduct.

Art. 7: Commissioners must possess recognised professional experience in areas falling within the Commission’s remit.

Art. 8: (1) The Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson of the Commission and members of the Coordination Committee shall be appointed by decree of the President of the Republic for a term of 3 (three) years, renewable once where necessary.

(2) The above provision notwithstanding in case of gross misconduct, the term of office of the Commission Chairperson or of members of the Coordination Committee may terminate at any moment.

(3) In the event of legal proceeding or manifest conflict of interest, the appointing authority shall suspend the Commissioner concerned from duty.

Art. 9: (1) In the event of death while in office or whenever the Commission Chairperson is or a member of the Coordination Committee is no longer able to perform his duties, he shall be replaced.

(2) Where the Commission Chairperson is temporarily unavailable or is suspended, the Vice-Chairperson of the Commission shall deputise up to the end of the period of unavailability or suspension.

II- Permanent Secretariat

Art. 10: Under the authority of a Permanent Secretary, who shall be the main administrative assistant of the Commission Chairperson, the Permanent Secretariat shall be responsible for:

– handling matters of the Commission;

– coordinating activities of the structures of the Commission;

– ensuring the training and retraining of Commission staff;

– assisting Commissioners on investigation missions;

– participating in gathering evidence within the frame work of inquiries conducted by the commission;

– collecting, centralising and analysing information and denunciations in respect of corrupt practices, deeds and facts or similar offences;

– conducting studies or capacity building for anti-corruption bodies;

– analysing reports from anti-corruption units in ministries;

– preparing meeting and drawing up half-yearly reports of the NACC;

– monitoring the implementation of the Commission recommendations.

Art. 11: The Permanent Secretariat shall comprise:

– the investigations division;

– the prevention and communication division;

– the studies and cooperation divisions;

– the mail and records service

– the general affairs service;

– the translation service.

Art. 12: (I) Under the authority of a division head, the investigations division shall be responsible for:

– assisting Commissioners on investigation missions;

– participating in gathering evidence within the framework of inquiries conducted by the Commission;

– conducting special inquiries ordered by the Commission Chairman;

– collecting, centralising and analysing information and denunciations in respect of corrupt practices, deeds and facts or similar offences;

– preparing Commissions missions;

– following up legal and disciplinary proceedings;

– performing any other duties assigned it by the Commission Chairman or the Permanent Secretary.

(2) Besides the division head, it shall comprise 5 (five) research officers and 5 (five) assistant research officers.

Art. 13: (1) Under the authority of a division head, the prevention and communication division shall be responsible for:

– proposing measures to prevent and eradicate corruption;

– informing the public on the activities to prevent and combat corruption;

– raising awareness and informing the public on the anti-corruption drive;

– drafting and implementing the Commission’s communication plan;

– performing any other duties assigned it by the Commission Chairperson.

(2) Besides the division head, it shall comprise 2 (two) research officers and 3 (three) assistant research officers.

Art. 14: (1) Under the authority of a division head, the studies and cooperation division shall be responsible for:

– conducting studies and capacity-building for anti-corruption bodies;

– developing partnership with national and international anti-corruption bodies;

– collecting and keeping documents;

-establishing a documentation centre;

– conducting any other studies entrusted to it by the Chairperson or the Permanent Secretary of the commission.

(2) Besides a division head, it shall comprise 2(two) research officers and 3 (three) assistant research officers.

Art. 15: Under the authority of a service head, the mail and records service shall be responsible for:

Receiving and dispatching incoming and outgoing mail;

Keeping the card index and record.

Art. 16: Under the authority of a service head, the general affairs service shall be responsible for:

– managing personnel;

– preparing and executing the budget;

– preparing quarterly and annual management and budget execution reports;

– preparing mission orders to be submitted to the Commission Chairperson for signature;

-managing, maintaining and keeping equipment;

– designating and implementing the data processing master plan of the Commission;

– conducting studies on the development operation and maintenance of the computer network and applications of the Commission;

-developing data bank and databases of the different computer sub-systems of the Commission;

– ensuring the securement available and integrity of the Commission’s computer system.

Art. 17: Under the authority of a service head, assisted by the deputy service head, the translation service shall be responsible for the routine translation of the commission’s documents.

Chapter III – Functioning

Art. 18: (1) The coordination committee shall meet at least once every month at the behest of its Chairperson.

(2) The coordination committee shall validly conduct business only in the present of two-thirds of its members.

(3) Decisions of the coordination committee shall be taken by a simple majority of members present. In the case of a tie, the Chairperson shall have a casting vote.

Art. 19: The Commission shall duly investigate, within a reasonable time-frame, upon receipt of any denunciation or matter referred to it.

Art. 20: Commissioners shall be vested with the relevant powers to monitor, assess and investigate in the performance of their duties.

To that end, Commissioners on assignment:

– shall have a right to access all government, semi-public and private services as well as all documents and information needed for the discharged of their duties;

Shall be authorised to request information from any public servant, whether an official or not as well as from any natural person or corporate body awarded a public contract.

Art. 21: (1) Any refusal to collaborate with or support a Commissioner discharging his duties may lead to disciplinary or administrative sanction.

(2) Where such refusal is by a member of Government or manager of a public enterprise, the matter shall be reported immediately to the President of the Republic.

Art. 22: (1) Findings of the investigations conducted by the Commission shall lead to disciplinary or legal proceedings.

(2) Where deeds and facts likely to be considered as corruption or any related offence is established, the Commission shall gather evidence and forward the file to the President of the Republic for appropriate decisions.

(3) However, in order to establish a case of flagrante delito following denunciation, the Commission shall request the competent state services. The Commission Chairperson may directly contact the Minister in charge of Justice, and inform the employer of the accused person(s) thereof.

Art. 23: (1) The Commission Chairperson and members of the Coordination committee may follow up legal proceedings in court.

(2) To that end, the commission Chairperson shall appoint a representative of the Commission.

Art. 24: (1) The Commission’s annual action programme shall be approved by the President of the Republic.

(2) A report shall be drawn up following each Commission assignment. It shall be forwarded to the President of the Republic and to the Government services responsible for implementing its recommendations.

(3) The Commission shall submit to the President of the Republic an annual report on anti-corruption drive.

(4) Such annual report shall be published.

Chapter IV – Rights and Obligations of Commissioners

Art. 25: (1) Commissioners shall be bound to professional secrecy. They shall swear the oath before the Supreme Court.

(2) The oath shall be as follows: “I undertake to discharge my duties with integrity without fear or favour and in total independence, in accordance with the Constitution, laws and regulations of the Republic”.

Art. 26: (1) The State shall be bound to protect Commissioners against threats, contempt, assault, insult of defamation to which they may be exposed on account of or in the discharge of their duties.

(2) The State shall be bound to compensate Commissioners for any damages suffered as a result of deeds of the Commission. In such case, the State shall automatically substitute for the victim to obtain from the accused persons the refund of the sums paid by it to the commissioner and other expenses incurred.

(3) Subjected to compliance with the Constitution as well as the law and regulations in force, Commissioners may not be prosecuted, pursed, arrested or detained for opinions expressed or acts committed in the performance of their duties.

Chapter V – Financial provisions

Art. 27: Commission resources shall be derived from:

– State budget appropriations;

– funds from development partners;

– sundry gifts and legacies;

– any other resources.

Art. 28: (1) The Commission shall manage part of its budget as a special imprest.

(2) The Commission may open a bank account for other resources.

Art 29: The acceptance of resources other than those of the State shall be subjected to the prior approval of the President of the Republic.

Art. 30: The Commission Chairperson shall be the authorising officer.

Art. 31: (1) The budget of the Commission shall be governed by public accounting rules and shall be managed in accordance with the laws and regulations in force.

(2) Funds from partners, gifts and legacies shall be managed in accordance with conditions agreed upon by the parties and recorded in compliance with public accounting rules.

Art. 32: The management of the Commission’s funds shall be audited by the competent services of the State.

Chapter VI – Provisions Relating to Human Resources

Art. 33: The Commission may call on short tem staff or sworn experts.

Art. 34: (1) The staff of the Commission shall be made up of civil servants or state employees seconded or posted by the administration.

(2) However, the Commission may recruit its own personnel, if need be.

Art. 35: (1) The Permanent Secretary shall be appointed by decree of the President of the Republic.

(2) The division heads, research officers, assistant-research officers, service heads and their assistants shall appointed by decision of the Commission Chairperson following a resolution of the Coordinating Committee.

Art. 36: The staff rules and regulations, the types and rates of the benefits of the Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson, members of the Coordinating Committee and officials as well as the other staff members shall be fixed by the Coordinating Committee following the approval of the President of the Republic.

Chapter VII – Miscellaneous and final provisions

Art. 37: The Commission shall draw up and adopt its internal rules and regulations.

Art. 38: All previous provisions repugnant hereto, in particular, those of order No. 1/PM of 4 January 2000 to set up the anti-corruption observatory, are hereby repealed.

Art. 40: This decree shall be registered, published according to the procedure of urgency and inserted in the official gazette in English and French.

Section 1: This law, enacted pursuant to Article 66 of the Constitution, relates to the declaration of assets and property.

Chapter 1

General Provisions

Section 2: (1) The following shall be liable to declaration of assets and property, in accordance with the provisions of this law:

– the President of the Republic;

– the Prime Minister;

– members of Government and persons ranking as such;

– the President and members of the Bureau of the National Assembly;

– the President and members of the Bureau of the Senate;

– members of Parliament, Senators;

– all holders of elective offices;

– Secretaries-General of Ministries and persons ranking as such;

– Directors of the Central Administration;

– General Managers of public and semi-public enterprises;

– Judicial and Legal Officers;

– Personnel of government services in charge of the tax base, collection and handling of public funds and budget control;

– All managers of the public votes and property.

(2) The following shall also be liable to declaration of assets and property:

– the President of the Economic and Social Council;

– Ambassadors;

– Rectors of State Universities;

– Government Delegates to certain councils;

– Board Chairpersons of enterprises of the public and semi-public sector;

-Provincial Governors and Senior Divisional Offices;

– Chairpersons of Tender Boards;

– President of Trade Chambers;

– Managers of projects funded externally and/or with State subsidies;

– Officials in charge of Administrative and judicial liquidations;

– Officials of the public administrative establishments and State-owned corporations up to the rank of Director;

– Central Administration officials ranking as Central Administration Directors.

(3) Any authorizing officer in a partnership or private body that receives public funds in the form of subventions or donations shall also declare his assets and property at the beginning and the end of his tenure of office.

Section 3: (1) Mandatory declaration of assets and property shall concern all property.

(2) Declaration shall concern movable and immovable property and tangible and intangible property in and out of the country and belonging to the person liable, his spouse and their minor descendants right up to the first degree.

(3) It shall also concern any benefit enjoyed by the person concerned and his minor descendants of the first degree or beneficiary ascendants, as well as any interest they hold in any private company, whatsoever.

(4) Household equipment and personal effects shall not be subject to the declaration of assets and property.

CHAPTER II

Conditions of Assets and Property Declaration

Section 4: (1) The officials and persons referred to in Section 2 above shall file the declaration of assets and property on their honour in the form and under conditions provided for by law, and forward same to the competent body within 90 (ninety) days of their election or appointment and no more than 60 (sixty) days following the end of their tenure of office.

Section 5: Where and when necessary, the declaration of assets and property may be updated within 30 (thirty) days of its submission.

CHAPTER III

Assets and Property Declaration Reception Commission

Section 6: A Commission responsible for receiving, exploring and preserving declarations from the persons referred to in Section 2 above, hereinafter refereed to “Assets and property Declaration Commission”, is hereby set up.

Section 7: (1) The Commission shall be composed as follows:

Chairman

– A personality appointed by the President of the Republic.

Members

– two personalities appointed by the president of the Republic;

– a personality appointed by the President of the National Assembly;

– a personality appointed by the President of the Senate;

– a State Inspector, representing the Supreme State Audit Services;

– two representatives of the Supreme Court, including one members from the audit Bench;

– a representative of the Association of Notaries.

(2) Commissioners shall be appointed by decree of the President of the Republic, for 5 (five)-year term of office, renewable once, where necessary. They may be replaced only in the same form, in the event of death, resignation or gross misconduct.

(3) Commissioners shall take the following oath before the Supreme Court prior to assuming office: “I swear to discharge my duties with objectivity and integrity and to keep secret any information I have been acquainted with in the discharge of such duties”.

(4) Commissioners shall be bound, before and after assuming office, by mandatory declaration of assets and property, under the conditions provided for in Section 4 above.

(5) During and after the performance of their duties, Commissioners shall be bound to reserve and secrecy in respect of all or part of the assets and property declarations issues.

(6) The organization and functioning of the commission shall be defined by decree of the President of the Republic.

Section 8: (1) The Commission may communicate its comments on the declaration of assets and property to any declarant through any written means. The declarant shall be bound to acknowledge receipt thereof and respond within 45 (forty-five) days.

(2) Any refusal to reply to Commission’s comments shall be tantamount to failure to declare assets and property.

(3) The Commission shall ensure the confidentiality of the information received and of its discussions with declarants.

(4) However, the Commission may, within the context of a criminal investigation, forward all or part of the declaration to judicial authorities should the latter so request.

Section 9: (1) When in doubt of the authenticity of a declaration of assets and property and in the absence of supplementary information from the official concerned, the Commission may request the competent State bodies to probe the actual status of the property of the person concerned.

(2) In the event of false declaration, the declarant shall be liable to sanctions provided for under Section 15 of this Law.

Section 10: In the event of refusal to declare assets and property by the persons liable or doubt on the declaration, the Commission may request any competent public or private service to communicate to it, any information that may help establish the assets and property of the persons concerned.

Section 11: (1) The premises of the Commission shall be inviolable during the performance of its duties.

(2) The records of the Commission may not be published or disclosed in whole or in part by any means whatsoever.

Chapter IV

Transitional, Miscellaneous and final provisions

Section 12: Persons liable who are currently in office shall declare their assets and property within 90 (ninety) days, with effect from the date of the setting up of the Commission.

Section 13: (1) Where after the declaration of assets and property provided for by this law, the Commission notices that the declarant is in possession of assets of unjustified origin or not commensurate with the declarant’s annual income or earnings serving as such, it may resort to compromise, for the benefit of State, of all or part of the declarant’s movable and immovable property, under conditions provided for by Law No. 73/7 of 7 December 1973 on the treasury’s rights to safeguard public funds.

(2) In the event of non-acceptance of the compromise, the Commission shall propose to the President of the Republic the transmission of the file to the Minister of Justice for the intention of public proceedings.

Section 14: (1) The Commission shall, each year, forward a progress report to the President of the Republic.

(2) The Commission shall, at any time, inform the president of the Republic of any obstacle to the performance of its duties, compliance or non-compliance by the officials referred to in Section 2 above, with the mandatory declaration of assets and property.

Section 15: (1) Any holder of an elective office, who either makes a false declaration or fails to declare his assets and property, shall not be eligible for any election at the end of his tenure of office.

(2) Any person appointed to a position provided for in section 2 of this law, who fails to declare his assets and property, shall be dismissed from office, subject to compliance with the appointment procedure.

(3) Any appointed manager of public property and funds, who makes a false declaration of his assets and property, shall also de dismissed from office, subject to compliance with the appointment procedure. In addition, such person may not be appointed to any of the positions specified in Section 2 of this law, for a period of 5(five) years.

(4) However, dismissal may occur only following a warning for further period of 45 (forty-five) days issued to the defaulting official by the Commission.

(5)Any public funding in the form of subventions or donations of a partnership or any other body whose expenditure authorizing officer has not declared his assets and property, shall be suspended. Such suspension shall be lifted once the official concerned declares his assets and property.

Section 16: (1) Whoever discloses all or part of a declaration of assets and property in any manner whatsoever without authorization shall be liable to the sanctions provided under Section 310 of the Penal Code.

(2) However, the declaration of assets and property may be disclosed to their parties where the declarant so requests in writing, giving reasons for such request.

Section 17: Decrees of the President of the Republic shall, as and when necessary, define the conditions of implementation of this law.

Section 18: This law shall be registered, published according to the procedure of urgency, and inserted in the Official Gazette in English and in French.

Offences by public servants

Section 131- Definition of Public Servant

For the purpose of any criminal law, a public servant shall include any judicial or legal officer, any law official, and employee or official of the State or of any other body corporate governed by the law, or of a corporation or semi-public corporation, of a law official, any Armed Forces or Gendarmerie serviceman, any employee of the National Security or Prison Administration and any person charged; whether continuously or occasionally with any public duty, mission or task, while acting in the discharge of his office or in relation to the said office.

Section 132 – Aggravation of Public Servant

(1) Any public servant who uses force to any person shall be punished, where no heavier punishment is provided, with imprisonment for from six months to five years.

(2) The punishment provided by section 189 (copying Government papers); 206; (licences, etc); 207 (official certificates); 291 (1) false arrest); 292 (forced labour); 299 (invasion of residence); 300 (tempering with correspondence); 310 (professional confidence); 315 (forged certificate) shall be doubled where the offender is a public servant.

Section 133 – Forfeitures, confiscation and publicity

(1) Upon conviction for any offence defined in the Chapter, or sentence under Section 89 of this Code, the Court may impose on the public servant found guilty the forfeitures described by section 30 of this Code.

Provided that the Court shall be bound to impose the forfeitures listed in Section 30 in the cases covered by section 134,134(a), 135, 136 and 161 of this Code.

(2) Where sentence is passed for any offence referred to in Sections 134, 134(a), 135,136 and 161 of this Code, the Court shall be bound to order the confiscation provided for in section 35 and that its decision be made known by print media, by radio or by television.

Section – 134

(1) Any public servant or government employee who, for himself or for a third party, solicits, accepts or receives any offer, promise, gift or present in order to perform, refrain from performing or postpone any act of his office shall be punished with imprisonment for from five to ten years and with fine of from two hundred thousand to two million francs.

(2) The term of imprisonment shall be from one to five years and the fine from one hundred thousand to one million francs where the act does not lie within the competence of the person corrupted but was however facilitated by his office.

(3) Any public servant or government employee who solicits or accepts any reward in money or find for himself or for a third party, as remuneration for having already performed or refrained from any such act shall be punished in like manner as under the foregoing subsection (2).

134 (a)

(1) Whoever makes promises, offers, gifts and presents or yields to requests liable to results in corruption in order to obtain either the performance, postponement or abstention from an act or one of the favours or benefits defined in the foregoing Section shall be punished in like manner as under the foregoing Section 134 (1) whether the corruption produced its effect or not.

(2) Whoever makes gifts and presents or yield, to request for the remuneration of an act which has or has not been performed shall be punished in like manner as under the foregoing Section 134 (2).

Section 135 – Interest in Grant

(1) Any public servant or government employee who takes or accepts any interest, direct or indirect:

(a) In any grant, contract or selection of tenders subject to his opinion or which he supervised, controlled, administered or drew up;

(b) In any private concern, cooperative, semi-public corporation or corporation in which the State has shares, in any authority or concession subject to his supervision or control.

Section 140 – Oppression

(1) Any public servant who takes advantage of his position to infringe any private right or interest shall be punished with imprisonment for from three months to one year, or with fine of from five thousand to fifty thousand francs, or with both such imprisonment and fine.

(2) Where the offence is committed with intent to procure for the offender of for another any gain of any kind, the imprisonment shall be for from three months to three years, and the fine of from fifty thousand to one million francs.

Section 141 – Against Civic Rights

Any public servant who obstructs the exercise by a citizen of his electoral rights, or his exercise or enjoyment of the rights mentions in section 30(1), (2), (4) or (5) of this Code, shall be punished with imprisonment for from one to five years.

Section 142- Undue Demand

Any public servant, notary, public auctioneer, bailiff or process-server or representative of any such, who demands any fee, due, duty or tax which is not due, or any material benefit otherwise than on payment of the proper price, shall be punished with imprisonment for from two to ten years and with fine of from twenty thousand to two million francs.

Section 143 – Favour

(1) Any public servant who decides between parties from favour or ill-will shall be punished with imprisonment for from one year to five years.

(2) Where the public servant is a judicial or legal officer or federal inspector or senior divisional officer, the penalty shall be doubled.

(Law No. 96-06 of 18 January 1996 to amend the Constitution of 2 June 1972)

Part XII Special provisions

Article 66

The President of the Republic, the Prime Minister, Members of Government and persons ranking as such, the President and Members of the Bureau of the National Assembly, the President and Members of the bureau of the Senate, Members of Parliament, Senators, all holders of an elective office, Secretaries-General of Ministries and persons ranking as such, Directors of the Central Administration, General Managers of public and semi-public enterprises, Judicial and Legal Officers, administrative personnel in -charge of the tax. base, collection and handling of public funds, all managers of public votes and property, shall declare their assets and property at the beginning and at the end of their tenure of office.

The other categories of persons to whom the provisions of this article shall apply and the conditions of implementation thereof shall be determined by law.

Risk

Sovereign risk

Cameroon retains its B sovereign risk rating this quarter, with the underlying risk score stable at 59. Lower oil prices since mid-2014 are undermining the fiscal and current accounts, as reflected by falling foreign reserves, a growing external financing gap and a lower coverage of this gap by foreign direct investment inflows. As a result, public debt levels, while still low and manageable, are rising fast and repayment capacity has weakened.

Banking sector risk

The banking system’s health is undermined by the financial troubles of four (out of 13) commercial banks, poor loan quality and excessive exposure to the national oil refinery. Access to finance is constrained by a poor business climate, weak regulation and insufficient information on borrowers.

Political risk

Political risk mainly stems from uncertainty about the succession to the 82-year-old Mr Biya and the rapid spread of Islamist militants in northern Cameroon. Popular discontent and factionalism within the army could also undermine stability.

Economic structure risk

A high level of fiscal dependence on oil revenue and vulnerability to the EU’s business cycle are sources of structural weakness. Following the recent slump in global crude oil prices, Cameroon’s dependency on oil for exports and government revenue will have a negative impact on economic performance in 2015.

Travel Risk

Security

The decision to travel is your responsibility. You are also responsible for your personal safety abroad. The Government of Canada takes the safety and security of Canadians abroad very seriously and provides credible and timely information in its Travel Advice. In the event of a crisis situation that requires evacuation, the Government of Canada’s policy is to provide safe transportation to the closest safe location. The Government of Canada will assist you in leaving a country or a region as a last resort, when all means of commercial or personal transportation have been exhausted. This service is provided on a cost-recovery basis. Onward travel is at your personal expense. Situations vary from one location to another, and there may be constraints on government resources that will limit the ability of the Government of Canada to provide assistance, particularly in countries or regions where the potential for violent conflict or political instability is high.

The Far North region (see Advisory)

The growing presence of extremist groups has resulted in an increase of kidnappings and banditry in this region. The most recent kidnapping, involving a Canadian and two Italians, took place on April 5, 2014.

The areas bordering Nigeria, Chad and the Central African Republic (see Advisory)

A state of emergency is in effect in the Nigerian states of Borno and Adamawa, which border northwest Cameroon. Instability in these provinces could spill over into Cameroon.

Carjacking, assaults, kidnappings and other forms of armed banditry occur in these areas. Security risks have increased along the border with Nigeria as a result of the situation in Mali, which has prompted terrorist groups in the region to declare their intention to increase attacks and kidnappings targeting Westerners.

The Bakassi Peninsula (see Advisory)

Various forms of banditry have been reported in this area due to its isolated location. The risk of social tensions may increase as the end of the Green Tree Agreement approaches (August 2013).

Ebola

The air, land and maritime borders with Nigeria are closed, due to the Ebola outbreak. Flights originating from affected countries have been suspended until further notice. Confirm the status of your flight with the airline before heading to the airport.

Crime

Violent assault and robbery are on the rise in the Melong area, especially against foreign tourists. Hiking around the region is strongly discouraged. Avoid staying at the hotels in the Mount Manengouba and Twin Lakes areas.

Violent crime is on the rise, particularly in Yaoundé and Douala. Armed burglaries and attacks are common in urban centres, in tourist areas in the north, and on rural highways. Do not resist robberies as perpetrators may use violence. Violent assaults on taxi passengers can occur.

Petty theft is prevalent and occurs on trains, buses and taxis. The Hilton and Mont Fébé hotels offer a shuttle service from Nsimalen Airport to downtown Yaoundé. You should use this service or arrange to be met, especially after dark. Avoid isolated and poorer areas of Yaoundé, in particular la Briquetterie, Mokolo, and Mvog-Ada. Avoid travelling alone or after dark. Do not show signs of affluence.

fraud

Cases of attempted fraud are frequently reported in Cameroon. See our Overseas Fraud page for more information on scams abroad.

Demonstrations

You should avoid large crowds and political demonstrations, and exercise caution at all times. Contact the High Commission of Canada in Yaoundé for the latest security information.

Piracy

Pirate attacks occur in coastal waters and, in some cases, farther out at sea. Mariners should take appropriate precautions. For additional information, consult the Live Piracy Report published by the International Maritime Bureau.

Transportation

Major roads are in good condition but others are damaged and unsafe. Reckless driving, use of poorly maintained vehicles and lack of respect for traffic laws are common. Keep windows closed and doors locked at all times. Avoid driving after dark in rural areas and on the main road between Yaoundé and Douala. The presence of livestock and pedestrians on the roadway, and the lack of road and traffic signs pose hazards. Local police roadblocks are erected throughout the country, and you may be expected to make payments. Ask the officer to provide a ticket with a description of the violation(s). This ticket can be paid at a local court or at a police station.

Particular attention should be paid when travelling on roads in the Far North region near the Nigerian border. These regions, especially between Garoua and Kousseri in the Northern regions, are notorious for armed highway bandits, or “coupeurs de routes”. Four-wheel-drive vehicles are targeted.

In the event of an accident, you should, if possible, go to the next police station or to the High Commission of Canada in Yaoundé or to the Consulate of Canada in Douala to get assistance.

If travelling overland, carry sufficient supplies of water, food and fuel, as well as a reliable means of communication, such as a satellite or cellular telephone.

It is difficult to depart Cameroon via the land borders with Gabon and the Central African Republic due to poor road conditions, particularly during the rainy season. The border with Equatorial Guinea is frequently closed. You are advised to contact local authorities for the most current information.

You should always carry your driving permit and your vehicle’s registration documents.

Buses link Yaoundé to Douala, Bafoussam, Bamenda, Foumban and Dschang. Trains run daily between Yaoundé and the cities of N’Gaoundéré and Douala. Regular flights connect Yaoundé, Douala, Maroua, Garoua, N’Gaoundéré and several other cities.

See Transportation Safety in order to verify if national airlines meet safety standards.

General safety information

Carefully evaluate the security risks before deciding to travel to any location in Cameroon. Monitor news reports, and follow the advice of local authorities.

Stay informed of the security situation in the region in which you are travelling, and ensure that your hotel is safe.

You should carry certified copies of identification and travel documents at all times and keep originals in a safe place, such as a hotel safe. Tourist facilities are limited. Avoid shopping on the street. If possible, have a guide or buy from established shops.

Energy supply is poorly managed and power outages occur all over the country. Inadvertent power cuts are a daily occurrence and may last over eight hours. You are advised to turn off your electrical appliances before leaving your place of residence. Domestic gas may also be in short supply, especially during holiday periods such as December and January.

Annual Cases

Budget Autonomy Yes
Annual Budget of the Agency 2 700 000 000 FCFA, approximately 5 400 000 US Dollars.
Per Capital Expenditure US $ 0.20
Expeniture as % of the GDP 0.008%
Are employees protected by law from recrimination or other negative consequences when reporting corruption (i.e. whistle-blowing)? Yes
Does your country have freedom of information legislation? Yes
Does your country have conflict of interest legislation? Yes
Does your country have a financial disclosure system to help prevent conflicts of interest? Yes
Who appoints the head of your agency? The President of the Republic.
Who has the authority to remove the head of the ACA? The President of the Republic.
Is there any term limit for the head of the ACA? Yes , three years and renewable once.
Does your agency measure performance? Yes
Number of investigations launched
Number of investigations completed
Other, please specify
Number of outreach activities
Full access to Government Yes

Address Format

RECIPIENT

STREET_NAME [HOUSE_NUMBER]
LOCALITY
CAMEROON

Sample

Niles Nobody
Rue Onembele Nkou 12
Yaounde
Cameroon

Summary

Cameroon GDP Last Previous Highest Lowest Unit
GDP 29.27 26.47 29.27 0.62 USD Billion
GDP Growth Rate 1.70 -0.40 2.40 -0.80 percent
GDP Annual Growth Rate 5.10 5.70 8.70 1.90 percent
GDP per capita 991.65 963.97 1356.10 640.70 USD
GDP per capita PPP 2624.72 2551.44 2646.13 2074.10 USD
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