SWITZERLAND BACKGROUND CHECK

Please note that Info Cubic does not provide Police Certificates in Switzerland.

The police certificate in Switzerland covers both Switzerland and Liechtenstein. To obtain an “Extract from Central Police Records/Gesuch um Auszug aus dem Zentralstrafregister/Demande d’extrait du Casier Judiciaire Central/Domanda d’estratto del Caselario Giudiziale Centrale,” applicants must complete a police certificate application, and provide a copy of an official piece of identification to:

Schweizerisches Strafregister
Bundesrain 20
3003 Berne
Scweiz/Suisse/Svizzera

For more information on obtaining a certificate, visit the following website:
http://www.bj.admin.ch/bj/fr/home.html

We recommend Non-Swiss Nationals and Non-Residents to seek more information at their Swiss Embassy or Consulate.

GENERAL INFORMATION

GDP USD685.434bn (World ranking 20, World Bank 2013)
Population 8.08 million (World ranking 96, World Bank 2013)
Form of state Confederation (but similar to a federal republic)
Head of government Didier BURKHALTER (PRD)
Next elections 2015, legislative

 

CURRENT LOCAL TIME

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PRODUCTS IN SWITZERLAND

Data Protection

Switzerland

Contribution Details Schellenberg Wittmer

Christine Beusch-Liggenstorfer

of Counsel/Attorney at Law

Nadin Schwibs

Associate/Attorney at Law

Law

The processing of personal data is mainly regulated by the Federal Act on Data Protection of 19 June 1992 (“DPA”) and its ordinances, i.e. the Ordinance to the Federal Act on Data Protection (“DPO”) and the Ordinance on Data Protection Certification (“ODPC”).

In addition, the processing of personal data is further restricted by provisions in other laws, mainly with regard to the public sector and regulated markets.

Definition of Personal Data

Personal data means all information relating to an identified or identifiable natural or legal person.

Definition of Sensitive Personal Data

Sensitive personal data is defined as data on:

  • religious, ideological, political or trade union related views or activities;
  • health, the intimate sphere or racial origin;
  • social security measures; and
  • administrative or criminal proceedings and sanctions.

“Personality profiles” are protected to the same extent under the DPA as sensitive personal data. Personality profiles are collections of data that allow the appraisal of essential characteristics of the personality of an individual.

National Data Protection Authority

Federal Data Protection and information Commissioner (“fDPic”) Feldeggweg 1

CH 3003 berne

Switzerland

The FDPIC supervises federal and private bodies, advises and comments on the legal provisions on data protection and assists federal and cantonal authorities in the field of data protection.

The FDPIC informs the public about his findings and recommendations, and maintains and publishes the register for data files.

Registration

The processing of personal data by private persons does not usually have to be notified or registered, respectively. However, private persons must register their data files before the data files are opened, if:

  • they regularly process sensitive personal data or personality profiles; or
  • they regularly disclose personal data to third parties; and unless one of following exemptions applies;
  • the data is processed pursuant to a statutory obligation;
  • the Swiss Federal Council has exempted the particular processing from the registration requirement because it does not prejudice the rights of the data subjects;
  • the data controller uses the data exclusively for publication in the edited section of a periodically published medium and does not pass on any data to third parties without informing the data subjects;
  • the data is processed by journalists who use the data file exclusively as a personal work aid;
  • the data controller has designated a data protection officer who independently monitors internal compliance with data protection regulations and maintains a list of the data files; or
  • the data controller has acquired a data protection quality mark under a certification procedure according to Article 11 DPA and has notified the FDPIC of the result of the evaluation.

Data Protection Officers

There is no requirement under Swiss data protection law to appoint a data protection officer. However, a data controller can be dispensed from registering its data files if it has designated a data protection officer who.

  • an overriding private or public interest; or
  • law;
  •  sensitive personal data or personality files must not be disclosed to a third party, unless this is justified by:
  • the consent of the data subject (which must be given expressly in addition to the voluntariness and adequate information requirement);
  • an overriding private or public interest; or
  • law.

Transfer

Personal data may be disclosed outside Switzerland if the destination country offers an adequate level of data protection. The FDPIC maintains and publishes a list of such countries.

The FDPIC deems the data protection legislation of all EU and EEA countries to be adequate with regard to personal data of individuals. With regard to personal data of legal entities, only a few EU countries, such as Austria, Italy and Liechtenstein, provide an adequate level of data protection.

In the absence of legislation that guarantees adequate protection, personal data may be disclosed abroad only if:

  • sufficient safeguards, such as data transfer agreements or other contractual clauses, ensure an adequate level of protection abroad. These agreements or other safeguards must be notified to the FDPIC; to the extent that model clauses recognised by the FDPIC are used, mere information is sufficient;
  • there are binding corporate rules that ensure an adequate level of data protection in cross border data flows within a single legal entity or a group of companies, e.g. the US Swiss Safe Harbor Framework (which mirrors the US EU Safe Harbor Framework). Such rules must be notified to the FDPIC;
  • the data subject consents to the particular data export (consent must be given for each individual case, a generic consent is not sufficient);
  • the processing is directly connected with the conclusion or performance of a contract with the data subject;
  • disclosure is essential in order to safeguard an overriding public interest or for the establishment, exercise or enforcement of legal rights before the courts;
  • disclosure is required in order to protect the life or the physical integrity of the data subject; or
  • the data subject has made the personal data publicly accessible and has not expressly prohibited its processing.

Security

The data controller and any processor must take adequate technical and organisational measures to protect personal data against unauthorised processing and ensure its confidentiality, availability and integrity. In particular, personal data shall be protected against the following risks:

  • unauthorised or accidental destruction;
  • accidental loss;
  • technical errors;
  • forgery, theft or unlawful use; and
  • unauthorized altering, copying, accessing or other unauthorized processing.

The technical and organizational measures must be appropriate, in particular with regard to the purposes of the data processing, the scope and manner of the data processing, the risks for the data subjects and the current technological standards.

Breach Notification

There is no mandatory requirement to notify the FDPIC of any breach of the obligations under the DPA.

Enforcement

The FDPIC does not have specific direct powers to enforce the DPA. He may investigate cases on his own initiative or at the request of a third party and may issue recommendations that the method of processing be changed or abandoned. If the FDPIC’s recommendation is not complied with, he may refer the matter to the Swiss Federal Administrative Court for a decision.

Furthermore, the DPA provides for criminal liability and fines of up to CHF 10,000 if a private person intentionally fails to comply with the following obligations under the DPA:

  • duty to provide information when collecting sensitive data and personality profiles;
  • duty to safeguard the data subject’s right to information;
  • obligation to notify the FDPIC with regard to contractual clauses or binding corporate rules
  • in connection with the data transfer abroad;
  • obligation to register data files; or
  • duty to cooperate in an FDPIC investigation.

Criminal proceedings must be initiated by the competent cantonal prosecution authority. Finally, under Swiss civil law the data subject may apply for injunctive relief and may file a claim for damages as well as satisfaction and/or surrender of profits based on the infringement of its privacy.

Electronic Marketing

Electronic marketing practices must comply with the provisions of the Swiss Federal Act against Unfair Competition (“UCA”). consent by the recipient, i.e. opt-in. As an exception, mass advertisings may be sent without the consent of the recipient if the sender received the contact information in the course of a sale of his products or services, the recipient was given the opportunity to refuse the use of his/ her contact information upon collection and the mass advertising relates to similar products or services of the sender.

In addition, mass advertising emails must contain the sender’s correct name, address and email contact and must provide for an easy-access and free of charge opt-out.

(Enacted on 21 December 1937, Status as of 1 July 2011)

Title Nineteen: Corruption

1. Corruption of Swiss Public Officials

Active Corruption

Article 322ter

Any person who offers, promises or gives any undue advantage to a member of a judicial or other authority, a state employee [“fonctionnaire”], an expert, translator or interpreter employed by any authority, an arbitrator or a member of the armed forces, for the benefit of such person or any third party, for the commission or omission of an act in relation to his official functions that is contrary to his duties or depends on the exercise of his discretionary powers, shall be liable to reclusion for a maximum term of five years’ or imprisonment.

Passive Corruption

Article 322quater

Any person who, as a member of a judicial or other authority, a state employee [“fonctonnaire”], an expert, translator or interpreter employed by any authority or an arbitrator solicits, elicits a promise of or accepts an undue advantage, for his benefit or

that of any third party, for the commission or omission of an act in relation to his official function that is contrary to his duties or depends on the exercise of his discretionary powers, shall be liable to a maximum term of five years’ imprisonment.

Giving of an Advantage

Article 322quinquies

Any person who offers, promises or gives any undue advantage to a member of a judicial or other authority, a state employee [“fonctionnaire”], an expert, translator or interpreter employed by any authority, an arbitrator or a member of the armed forces so that he accomplishes the duties of his position shall be liable to imprisonment or a fine.

Acceptance of an Advantage

Article 322sexies

Any person who, as a member of a judicial or other authority, a state employee [“fonctionnaire”], an expert, translator or interpreter employed by any authority, or an arbitrator solicits, elicits a promise of or accepts an undue advantage so that he accomplishes the duties of his position shall be liable to imprisonment or a fine.

2. Active Corruption of Foreign Public Officials

Art. 322septies

Any person who offers, promises or gives an undue advantage to any person acting for a foreign State or an international organization either as a member of a judicial or other authority, a state employee [“fonctionnaire”], an expert, translator or interpreter employed by any authority, an arbitrator or a member of the armed forces, for the benefit of such person or any third party, for the commission or omission of an act in relation to his official functions that is contrary to his duties or depends on the exercise of his discretionary powers, shall be liable to reclusion for a maximum term of five years’ or imprisonment.

3. Common provisions

Giving of an Advantage

Article 322quinquies

Any person who offers, promises or gives any undue advantage to a member of a judicial or other authority, a state employee [“fonctionnaire”], an expert, translator or interpreter employed by any authority, an arbitrator or a member of the armed forces so that he accomplishes the duties of his position shall be liable to imprisonment or a fine.

Acceptance of an Advantage

Article 322sexies

Any person who, as a member of a judicial or other authority, a state employee [“fonctionnaire”], an expert, translator or interpreter employed by any authority, or an arbitrator solicits, elicits a promise of or accepts an undue advantage so that he accomplishes the duties of his position shall be liable to imprisonment or a fine.

2. Active Corruption of Foreign Public Officials

Art. 322septies

Any person who offers, promises or gives an undue advantage to any person acting for a foreign State or an international organization either as a member of a judicial or other authority, a state employee [“fonctionnaire”], an expert, translator or interpreter employed by any authority, an arbitrator or a member of the armed forces, for the benefit of such person or any third party, for the commission or omission of an act in relation to his official functions that is contrary to his duties or depends on the exercise of his discretionary powers, shall be liable to reclusion for a maximum term of five years’ or imprisonment.

Giving of an Advantage

Article 322quinquies

Any person who offers, promises or gives any undue advantage to a member of a judicial or other authority, a state employee [“fonctionnaire”], an expert, translator or interpreter employed by any authority, an arbitrator or a member of the armed forces so that he accomplishes the duties of his position shall be liable to imprisonment or a fine.

Acceptance of an Advantage

Article 322sexies

Any person who, as a member of a judicial or other authority, a state employee [“fonctionnaire”], an expert, translator or interpreter employed by any authority, or an arbitrator solicits, elicits a promise of or accepts an undue advantage so that he accomplishes the duties of his position shall be liable to imprisonment or a fine.

2. Active Corruption of Foreign Public Officials

Art. 322septies

Any person who offers, promises or gives an undue advantage to any person acting for a foreign State or an international organization either as a member of a judicial or other authority, a state employee [“fonctionnaire”], an expert, translator or interpreter employed by any authority, an arbitrator or a member of the armed forces, for the benefit of such person or any third party, for the commission or omission of an act in relation to his official functions that is contrary to his duties or depends on the exercise of his discretionary powers, shall be liable to reclusion for a maximum term of five years’ or imprisonment.

3. Common provisions

Article 322octies

1. If the offender’s guilt and the consequences of his act are so insignificant that a penalty would be inappropriate, the competent authority shall waive prosecution, judicial proceedings or the imposition of a penalty.

2. Advantages authorized by department regulations and advantages of minor value in conformity with socially accepted practices shall not be considered undue advantages.

3. Individuals who carry out public functions are deemed to be public officials.

Criminal liability of legal entities

Article 100quater

1.A crime or misdemeanour committed within an enterprise in the pursuit of its commercial activities in conformity with its objects shall be imputed to the enterprise if it cannot be imputed to any specific individual because of the enterprise’s lack of organisation. In such case, the enterprise shall be liable to a maximum fine of five million francs.

2. In the case of an offence under Articles 260ter, 260quinquies, 305bis, 322ter, 322quinquies and 322septies, the enterprise shall be punished independently of the punishment of any individual if it must be criticized [“s’il doit lui être reproché”] for having failed to take all reasonable and necessary organisational measures to prevent such an offence.

3. The courts shall set the amount of the fine taking into consideration the seriousness of the offence, the lack of organisation, the damage caused and the economic capacity of the enterprise.

4. The following are deemed enterprises within the meaning of this article:

a) private law legal persons;

b) public law legal persons except for territorial corporations;

c) companies;

d) single-person enterprises.

Article 100quinquies

1. If criminal proceedings are initiated against the enterprise, the enterprise shall be represented by a single person who must be authorised to represent the enterprise in civil matters without restriction. If, after a reasonable lapse of time, the enterprise fails to appoint such a representative, the investigating authority or the courts shall appoint the person who, among those empowered to represent the enterprise in civil matters, will represent it in the criminal proceedings.

2. The person who represents the enterprise in the criminal proceedings shall have the rights and obligations of a defendant. The other representatives referred to in paragraph 1 are not obliged to give evidence.

3. If a criminal investigation is opened for the same offences or for related offences against the person who represents the enterprise in the criminal proceedings, the enterprise shall appoint another representative. If necessary, the investigating authority or the courts shall appoint another representative within the meaning of paragraph 1 or, failing that, a qualified third party.

Money laundering (Article 305bis)

1. Any person who commits an act such as to impede identification of the origin or the discovery or confiscation of assets which he knew or must have presumed to have originated in a criminal offence shall be liable to imprisonment or a fine.

2. In serious cases, the penalty shall be reclusion for a maximum term of five years or imprisonment. The custodial sentence shall be consecutive with a maximum fine of one million francs. A case is serious when the offender: a) acts as a member of criminal organisation; b) acts as a member of a gang formed to systematically launder money; c) generates substantial revenues or profit from money laundering.

3. Offenders are also liable when the principal offence has been committed in another country and is punishable in the State where it was committed.

Lack of vigilance with regard to financial transactions and right of disclosure (Article 305ter)

1. Any person who, in the course of his duties, accepts assets belonging to third parties, keeps them on deposit or assists in investing or transferring them without verifying the identity of the economic beneficiary with the diligence required under the circumstances shall be liable to imprisonment for a maximum of one year, detention or a fine.

2. The persons referred to in paragraph 1 are entitled to disclose to the Swiss prosecuting authorities and the federal authorities designated by law the evidence on which the suspicion that the assets were of criminal origin is based.

Fraud (Article 146, para. 1)

Any person who, with the intention of unlawfully enriching himself or a third party, deceitfully misleads a person by fallacious assertions or by concealing true facts or deceitfully confirms that person in his error and thereby induces the victim to decide to commit acts prejudicial to his pecuniary interests or those of a third party shall be liable to reclusion for a maximum term of five years or imprisonment.

False information about commercial enterprises (Article 152)

Any person who, as founder, owner, partner with unlimited liability, manager, member of the management body, board of directors or audit body or liquidator of a commercial company, cooperative or any other enterprise operated in commercial form provides or causes the provision, in disclosures to the public or in reports or proposals intended for all the shareholders of a commercial company or cooperative or all the participants of another enterprise operated in commercial form, of false or incomplete information of considerable importance such as to induce another person to decide to dispose of his assets in a way that prejudices his pecuniary interests shall be liable to imprisonment or a fine.

Forged documents (Article 251)

1. Any person who, with the intention of adversely affecting the pecuniary interests or rights of another person or of procuring an unlawful advantage for himself or a third party, forges or falsifies a document, misuses the real signature or personal mark of

another person to make a false document or falsely states a fact of legal import or causes such fact to be stated in a document, or

2. In inconsequential cases, the courts may order imprisonment or a fine.

Federal and cantonal jurisdiction (Article 340bis)

1. Offences under Articles 260ter, 260quinquies, 305bis, 305ter and 322ter to 322septies and crimes committed by a criminal organisation within the meaning of Article 260ter are also subject to federal jurisdiction: a) if the punishable acts have been predominantly

committed in another country; b) if the punishable acts have been committed in several cantons without any one of them being clearly predominant.

2. For offences under the second and eleventh titles, the Office of the Attorney General of Switzerland may open an investigation:

a) if the conditions set forth at paragraph 1 are met; b) and if no cantonal prosecuting authority has initiated proceedings or the competent cantonal prosecuting authority asks the Office of the Attorney General of Switzerland to take over proceedings.

3. The opening of the investigation referred to at paragraph 2 establishes federal jurisdiction.

Police Background Check Procedures

Who can apply?

• Any Swiss citizen can apply.
• Third party representatives can apply.
• Prospective UK employers cannot apply, but can arrange to have the Extract sent directly to them.

Where?

• Local applicants can apply online to the Swiss Criminal Records Register, or in
person at their local post office.
• Overseas applicants are advised to apply online, and notarise document at Swiss Federal Chancellery before passing onto prospective employer.

What must the applicant supply?

Online applicants:
• Completed online application form
• Copy of passport
• Receipt of payment (only when paying by deposit slip)
• Posting address (if third party requires written consent)
The application form must be printed and sent with the accompanying documents to the Swiss Criminal Records Register in Bern.
Applicants in person:
• Complete form on electronic system
• Proof of identity (passport or ID card)
• Posting address (if third party, requires written consent)

What are the costs / turnaround times?

• Fee of CHF20.00 (approx. £12.20).
• Notarisation fee of CHF 20.00 (approx. £12.20).

Contact Details

Useful website- https://www.bj.admin.ch/bj/en/home/publiservice/service/strafregister.html
Online application: https://www.e-service.admin.ch/crex/cms/content/faq/vorgehen_en (English)
Email: info@bj.admin.ch
All documents must be sent to:
Schweizerisches Strafregister
Dienst für Auszüge an Privatpersonen
Bundesrain 20
CH-3003 Berne
Switzerland
Tel: (+41) 31 325 01 98
Swiss Embassy
16-18 Montague Place
London
W1H 2BQ
Tel: 020 7616 6000
Fax: 020 7724 7001
Email: swissembassy@lon.rep.admin.ch

Know Your Customer (KYC) Rules

Switzerland is a major international financial center. Reporting indicates that criminals attempt to launder illegal proceeds in Switzerland from a wide range of criminal activities conducted worldwide. These illegal activities include, but are not limited to, financial crimes, narcotics trafficking, arms trafficking, organized crime, terrorist financing and corruption.

Although both Swiss and foreign individuals or entities launder money in Switzerland, foreign narcotics trafficking organizations, often based in Russia, the Balkans, Eastern Europe, South America and West Africa, dominate the narcotics-related money laundering operations in Switzerland.

KNOW-YOUR-CUSTOMER (KYC) RULES:

Enhanced due diligence procedures for PEPs:

PEP is an abbreviation for Politically Exposed Person, a term that describes a person who has been entrusted with a prominent public function, or an individual who is closely related to such a person. The terms PEP, Politically Exposed Person and Senior Foreign Political Figure are often used interchangeably

    • Foreign PEP: YES
    • Domestic PEP: YES

Switzerland – KYC covered entities

The following is a list of Know Your Customer entities covered by Swiss Law:

    • Banks
    • Securities and insurance brokers
    • Money exchangers or remitters
    • Financial management firms
    • Investment companies
    • Insurance companies
    • Casinos
    • Individuals acting as intermediaries in bank lending, money transactions, or trading of currencies, or providing wealth management and investment advice services

Switzerland – Suspicious Transaction Reporting (STR) Requirements:

Number of STRs received and time frame: 1,159 in 2010

The following is a list of STR covered entities covered by Swiss Law:

    • Banks
    • Securities and insurance brokers
    • Money exchangers or remitters
    • Financial management firms
    • Casinos
    • Individuals acting as intermediaries in bank lending, money transactions, or trading of currencies, or providing wealth management and investment advice services

MONEY LAUNDERING CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS/CONVICTIONS:

Prosecutions: 360 in 2010 (Latest figures)
Convictions: 219 in 2009 (Latest figures)

ENFORCEMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES AND COMMENTS:

Because there are no laws for declaration of currency and monetary instruments, Swiss authorities cannot effectively conduct bulk cash investigations.

The number of suspicious activity reports increased by 29% from 2009 to 2010, to 1,159 reports encompassing a total of CHF 850 million (approximately $962 million), compared to CHF 2.2 billion (approximately $2.3 billion) in 2009. In 2010, 13 reports were related to terrorism finance, amounting to CHF 23 million (approximately $26 million).

The country‘s central geographic location, relative political, social, and monetary stability, the range and sophistication of financial services it provides, and its long tradition of bank secrecy not only contribute to Switzerland‘s success as a major international financial center, but also continue to expose Switzerland to potential money laundering abuse.

This potential is exacerbated by the current lack of adequate regulation of some potential means of facilitating money laundering, such as real estate, jewelry, luxury cars, works of art, and commodities like oil and gas.

Privacy Laws & Regulations

The Federal Data Protection and Information Commissioners (FDPIC) are responsible for enforcing and supervising the Federal Data Protection Act and Freedom of Information Act in Switzerland. These acts are the main regulations protecting the way that personal data is collected and handled in Switzerland. However, there are various provisions in other laws that further restrict or permit processing of personal data; such as the Telecommunication Act, the Unfair Competition Act, and the Code of Obligations. These regulations state that individuals should provide consent prior to the collection of data, unless the law suggests otherwise.

  • Data can only be collected if it is done so for relevant reasons and not in excess;
  • Data that is collected may only be used for the purpose for which is was collected;
  • Data must be up to date and accurate;
  • If the data is found to be inaccurate, it needs to be discarded and replaced with accurate data;
  • Once you are finished with the information collected, and it has fulfilled its purpose, the data must be destroyed;
  • Data that is collected must be stored in a safe location with very limited and relevant access.

Data Protection restrictions are in place for countries within the European Union (EU). They do not allow for the transfer of data to countries outside of the European Union. Due to this restriction, the Safe Harbor was created. When a company becomes Safe Harbor certified, they agree and certify that they will meet the privacy and data protection requirements set forth by the Safe Harbor Directive. Info Cubic is Safe Harbor certified, which allows us to obtain information from the EU.

Risk

Sovereign risk

A commitment to prudence is evident in the 2015 budget and the financial plan for 2016-18, which emphasise the statutory debt brake, requiring a balanced budget over the economic cycle. Notwithstanding a prospective slowing in economic growth over the near term, small budget surpluses will help lower the general government debt/GDP ratio to below 30% by 2019.

Banking sector risk

The banking sector score has also deteriorated, to 25 from 18, with the rating now at A versus AA previously. Swiss banks have limited direct exposure to troubled peripheral euro zone countries (amid ongoing uncertainty in the region). But prospectively weaker economic activity arising from a sharp appreciation in the Swiss franc’s exchange rate suggests banks’ non-performing loan ratios could move higher.

Political risk

The Economist Intelligence Unit does not expect the government’s composition to change at the next election, due in October 2015. However, the right-wing Swiss People’s Party (SVP) remains a source of potential instability.

Economic structure risk

The rating is supported by strong external and fiscal balance sheets. The authorities are taking steps to mitigate the risks posed by Switzerland’s large financial sector. A limit on EU immigration, narrowly passed in a referendum, has complicated relations with the EU and could curtail medium-term growth.

Travel Risk

Security

The decision to travel is your responsibility. You are also responsible for your personal safety abroad. The purpose of this Travel Advice is to provide up-to-date information to enable you to make well-informed decisions.

Crime

Petty crime has increased and occurs in most public areas, particularly in Berne, Zurich and Geneva. Pickpockets are active in public places, such as airports and railway stations. Exercise caution on trains, especially on overnight trips to neighbouring countries.

Thieves often operate in tandem, with one distracting the traveller while another snatches any valuables.

Never leave bags containing money, airline tickets, credit cards or passports in the trunk of a parked car and do not leave anything on car seats.

Alertswiss portal

The alertswiss portal (in French only) gathers essential information regarding disaster preparedness and emergency situations in Switzerland and provides guidance on how to behave. Exercise caution, follow the advice of local authorities and monitor local media.

Road travel

Although many roads are mountainous and winding, road conditions and safety standards are very good. In winter, snow tires are required and snow chains may be required as well in some mountain areas.

Demonstrations

Demonstrations occur periodically throughout the country. Avoid all demonstrations, follow the advice of local authorities and monitor local media.

Public Transportation

Public transportation is excellent.

See Transportation Safety in order to verify if national airlines meet safety standards.

Mountain activities

If you intend to do mountaineering or ski touring:

a) never practice these activities alone;

b) always hire an experienced guide from a reputable company;

c) buy travel health insurance that includes helicopter rescue and medical evacuation;

d) ensure you are in top physical condition;

e) advise a family member or friend of your itinerary and when you expect to be back;

f) know the symptoms of acute altitude sickness, which can be fatal;

g) register with the Embassy of Canada in Switzerland; and

h) obtain detailed information on trekking routes or ski slopes before setting out.

Special avalanche beacons can be purchased or rented to help searchers locate buried victims.

You are advised to visit the Switzerland Tourism website for information on weather and safety conditions.

General safety information

Exercise normal safety precautions. Ensure that your personal belongings, passports and other travel documents are secure at all times.

Emergency services

Dial 112 for emergency assistance and 140 for roadside assistance.

Address Format

RECIPIENT
STREET_NAME HOUSE_NUMBER [[APARTMENT][/][FLOOR]]
POSTAL_CODE LOCALITY
SWITZERLAND

Sample

Berta Mueller
Schulweg 4
8184 Bachenbülach
SWITZERLAND

Summary

Calendar GMT Reference Actual Previous Consensus Forecast
2014-09-02 06:45 AM Q2 0.6% 2.1% (R) 1.7% 1.5%
2014-12-03 06:45 AM Q3 1.9% 1.6% (R) 1.4% 0.45%
2015-03-03 06:45 AM Q4 1.9% 1.9% 1.7% 1.66%
2015-05-29 06:45 AM Q1 1.9% 1%
2015-08-27 06:45 AM Q2 0.74%
2015-12-01 06:45 AM Q3 0.6%
TOP
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