SWEDEN BACKGROUND CHECK

Undoubtedly verification agencies are booming in all part of world due to extensive demands of background verification and similar is the condition presumed here in Sweden too where almost all the corporate houses and businesses are finding the urgent needs of background verifications in Sweden to have the comprehensive control over the rising condition arising out due to fakeness in records and statements. The possibility of getting the higher corruption has alerted the businesses person to have the counteractive measures to prevent the frauds. Due to this reason, people in Sweden are finding the effective of background verification services in Sweden to manipulate entire situation arising out due to rising frauds in records and statements.

Our verifications in Sweden are treated as the worth processes for effective control over fraudulent practices and provide the greater supper to corporate world and business house have the opulent use of our verifications in Sweden. Now, people can get the clear access of our services being anywhere in Sweden including Stockholm, Gothenburg, Malmo, Uppsala, Vasteras, Orebro, Linkoping, Helsingborg, Jonkoping, Norrkoping, Lund, Umea, Gavle, Boras and Sodertalje. For taking the good use of our services in Sweden, kindly contact us on info@backcheckgroup.com for instant support of our background screeners in Sweden.

GENERAL INFORMATION

GDP USD570.591bn (World ranking 21, World Bank 2014)
Population 9.69 million (World ranking 89, World Bank 2014)
Form of state Constitutional Monarchy
Head of government Stefan LOFVEN (Social Democratic party)
Next elections 2018, legislative

 

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PRODUCTS IN SWEDEN

Data Protection

Contribution Details

Johan sundberg

Advokat/Partner

Johan sundkvist

Law

Being a member of the European Union, Sweden implemented the EU Data Protection Directive

95/46/EC in 1998 with the Personal Data Act (Sw. personuppgiftslagen, SFS 1998:204,

below “the Act”). The previous Swedish Data Act enacted in 1973 had by then already been considered to be outdated for many years.

Definition of Personal Data

Personal data means all kinds of information that is directly or indirectly referable to a natural living person.

Definition of sensitive Personal Data

Sensitive personal data means personal data that discloses race or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious or philosophical convictions and membership of trade unions. Personal data relating to health or sexual life is also embraced by the term.

National Data Protection authority

The Data inspection board (Sw. Datainspektionen, below “DiB”) is the supervisory authority under the Act.

Registration

All controllers except those whose processing falls under any of the exemptions in the Act, need to file notifications with the DIB.

Notification is not required if:

  • the controller has appointed a personal data representative (a data protection officer or
  • “Privacy Officer”) and notified the DPA about this, or
  • the processing would probably not result in an improper intrusion of personal integrity, if specified in rules issued by either the Government or the DIB (for instance processing of personal data in running text, processing takes place with the individuals consent, or the data relates to a registered person who has a link to the controller such as members, employees, customers).

Data Protection officers

There is no requirement in Sweden for organizations to appoint a data protection officer. It is a voluntary arrangement. However, if a data protection officer has been appointed and notified to the DIB, the general notification obligation does not apply. Instead, the officer has to maintain

a register of the processing that the data controller implements and which would have been

subject to the notification duty if the data protection officer had not existed.

Collection and Processing

Data controllers may collect and process personal data when any of the following conditions are met:

  • the data subject consents;
  • there is statutory authority for the processing;
  • the processing is necessary to fulfill a contract to which the data subject is party, or to take
  • steps at the request of the data subject prior to entering into such a contract;
  • the processing is necessary to enable the controller to fulfill a legal obligation;
  • the processing is necessary to protect the vital interests of the data subject;
  • the processing is necessary to perform a task in the public interest;
  • the processing is necessary to exercise official authority; or
  • to satisfy a purpose that concerns a justified interest on the part of the controller or on

the part of a third party to whom the personal data is disclosed, provided that this interest outweighs the registered person’s interest in protection against violation of personal integrity.

In relation to processing of sensitive personal data, additional requirements apply apart from what has been mentioned above.

Whichever of the above conditions is relied upon, the controller must first provide the data subject with certain information, unless an exemption applies. The notification shall include information on the identity of the controller, the purposes of the processing, whether the data will be disclosed and/or transferred and to who/where, the fact that the provision of data is voluntary and any other circumstances that will enable the data subject to exercise his/her rights pursuant to the Act

Transfer

In principle, it is forbidden to transfer personal data that is being processed to a country outside the EU/EEA that does not have an adequate level of protection for personal data.

Even if the third country in question does not have an adequate level of protection, it is allowed to transfer personal data to such country if the registered person has given his/her consent to the transfer or when the transfer is necessary in order that:

  • a contract between the registered person and the controller may be performed or measures that the registered person requested may be taken before a contract is made;
  • a contract between the controller and a third party that is in the interests of the registered person may be made or performed;
  • legal claims should be established, exercised or defended; or
  • vital interests of the registered person may be protected.

It is also permitted to transfer personal data for use solely in a state that has acceded to the Council of Europe Convention of 28 January 1981 on the protection of individuals in automatic data processing.

Transfer of personal data to third countries is allowed if the countries provide “adequate protection” for the security of the data, or if the transfer is covered by standard contractual clauses approved by the European Commission, or subject to an organization’s Binding Corporate Rules.

For transfer of data to the United States, compliance with the US/EU Safe Harbor principles satisfies the requirements of Sweden’s transfer law.

Security

The data controller is liable to implement technical and organizational measures to protect the personal data. The measures shall attain a suitable level of security. When the controller engages a data assistant to conduct the processing of personal data (data processor), there shall be a written contract that specifically regulates the security aspects. The controller shall also be responsible to ensure that the assistant actually implements the necessary security measures.

It is the controller who is responsible in relation to the registered person as regards the processing, even if an assistant/processor has been engaged or if someone who works for the controller has wrongfully disclosed personal data.

The DIB may issue decisions on security measures in individual cases.

Breach notification

There is no mandatory requirement in the Act to report data security breaches or losses to the DIB. Data security breaches are handled on a case-by-case basis and addressed by the DIB only if they for instance relate to a large number of data subjects or indicate a general

non-compliance issue. There is no DIB guidance on the subject matter.

However, pursuant to the implementation of the ePrivacy Directive as amended, regarding security breach notification obligations, chapter 6 of the Swedish Electronic Communications Act (Sw. lag om elektronisk kommunikation, SFS 2003:389) as of July 2011 provides that a provider of publicly available electronic communications services shall without undue delay notify the Swedish Post and Telecom Authority (Sw. Post och Telestyrelsen) regarding privacy incidents. Where the incident is likely to adversely affect subscribers or user of whom the processed data concerns, or where the Post and Telecom Authority requests it, the provider shall also notify subscribers without undue delay. Incidents that only have a marginal effect

on subscribers and users do not have to be notified to the authority. Moreover, notification is not required where the service provider has implemented appropriate security measures which renders the data unreadable to unauthorized persons.

Enforcement

The DIB has, in its capacity as the supervisory authority, the right of access to the personal data

processed and information about and the documentation of processing, and is also empowered

to enter premises connected with the processing.

Appeal may be made against a decision by the DIB to a general administrative court; i.e. in

the first instance the County Administrative Court. The DIB may decide that a decision should apply even if it is appealed against.

A person who has intentionally or by gross negligence disclosed untrue data under the Act, who in contravention of the regulations processes sensitive personal data or data concerning offences, etc., or transfers personal data to a third country or neglects to give notice concerning the processing to the supervisory authority may be sentenced to a fine or imprisonment of at most six months. If the offence is grave, the penalty may be imprisonment up to two years. A sentence shall not be imposed in petty cases.

Furthermore, the controller may also be liable to pay compensation to a registered person for damage and violation of personal integrity caused by the processing of personal data in contravention of the Act.

Electronic Marketing

The Act applies to most electronic marketing activities, given that it is likely that such marketing involves processing of personal data (e.g. an e-mail address is likely regarded as personal data under the Act). Please note that if the data subject’s e-mail address has not been obtained in the context of a customer relationship or similar, the data subject’s consent is, as a main rule, required for electronic marketing. Moreover, a data subject has a right to at any time

oppose (“opt-out” of ) further processing of his or her personal data for marketing purposes.

online Privacy (including cookies and Location Data)

Pursuant to the Swedish Electronic Communications Act (as amended by e-Privacy Directive

2009/12/EC), a cookie may be stored on a user’s terminal equipment, only if the user has been given access to information on the purpose of the processing and given his or her consent, i.e. the user must give his/her prior “opt-in” consent before a cookie is placed on the user’s computer. The government stated in the preparatory works to the Swedish Electronic Communications Act that the implementation of the new e-Privacy Directive should not be regarded as a material change. This has been construed by some that implied consent through browser settings shall be regarded as a valid consent under the Act, provided that sufficient information is given to the user e.g. in a cookie policy. This is, however, unclear and the Swedish Post and Telecom Authority has not issued any guidance in this regard.

Consent is, however, not required for cookies that are;

  • used for the sole purpose of carrying out the transmission of communication over an
  • electronic communications network; or
  • necessary for the provision of a service explicitly requested by the user.

Wilful or negligent breach of the Swedish Electronic Communications Act in this regard is sanctioned with fines, provided that the offense is not sanctioned by the Swedish Criminal Code (Sw. brottsbalken). However, if the breach is deemed to be minor, no sanction shall be imposed. To our knowledge there has been no case where a website operator has been fined for breach of the Swedish Electronic Communications Act.

Entry into force on 1 January 1965,Amended on 1 July 1999)

Section 7

A person who gives, promises or offers a bribe or other improper reward to an employee or other person defined in Chapter 20, Section 2, for the exercise of official duties, shall be sentenced for bribery to a fine or imprisonment for at most two years. (Law1977:103)

Section 8

A person who, in an election to public office or in connection with some other exercise of suffrage in public matters, attempts to prevent voting or to tamper with its outcome or otherwise improperly influence the vote, shall be sentenced for improper activity at election to a fine or imprisonment for at most six months. In assessing whether the crime is gross, special attention shall be paid to whether it had been committed by use of violence or the threat of violence or had involved misuse of an official position. A person who receives, accepts a promise of or demands an improper favour for voting in a certain manner or for abstaining from voting on a public matter, shall be sentenced, unless it is a crime of taking a bribe, for accepting an improper reward for voting to a fine or imprisonment for at most six months. (Law 1977:103)

Section 17

If a bribe has been given to a person who is neither an employee of the State or a local authority nor defined by Chapter 20, Section 2, second paragraph, points 1 – 4, a public prosecutor may only

prosecute if the crime is reported for prosecution by the employer or principal of the person exposed to bribery or if prosecution is called for in the public interest. (Law 1977:103)

Chapter 20 On Misuse of Office, etc.

Section 1

A person who in the exercise of public authority by act or by omission, intentionally or through carelessness, disregards the duties of his office, shall be sentenced for misuse of office to a fine or imprisonment for at most two years. If, having regard to the perpetrator’s official powers or the nature of his office considered in relation to his exercise of public power in other respects or having regard to other circumstances, the act may be regarded as petty, punishment shall not be imposed. If a crime mentioned in the first paragraph has been committed intentionally and is regarded as gross, a sentence for gross misuse of office to imprisonment for at least six months and at most six years shall be imposed. In assessing whether the crime is gross, special attention shall be given to whether the offender seriously abused his position or whether the crime occasioned serious harm to an individual or the public sector or a substantial improper benefit. A member of a decision-making national or municipal assembly shall not be held responsible under the provisions of the first or second paragraphs of this Section for any action taken in that capacity. Nor shall the provisions of the first and second paragraphs of this Section apply if the crime is subject to a punishment under this or some other Law. (Law 1989:608)

Section 2

An employee who receives, accepts a promise of or demands a bribe or other improper reward for the performance of his duties, shall be sentenced for taking a bribe to a fine or imprisonment for at most two years. The same shall apply if the employee committed the act before obtaining the post or after leaving it. If the crime is gross, imprisonment for at most six years shall be imposed. The provisions of the first paragraph in respect of an employee shall also apply to:

1. a member of a directorate, administration, board, committee or other such agency belonging to the State, a municipality, county council, association of local authorities, parish, religious society, or social insurance office,

2. a person who exercises a assignment regulated by statute,

3. a member of the armed forces under the Act on Disciplinary Offences by Members of the Armed Forces, etc. (1986:644), or other person performing an official duty prescribed by Law,

4. a person who, without holding an appointment or assignment as aforesaid, exercises public authority, and

5. a person who, in a case other than stated in points 1-4, by reason of a position of trust has been given the task of managing another’s legal or financial affairs or independently handling an assignment requiring qualified technical knowledge or exercising supervision over the management of such affairs or assignment.(Law 1993:207)

Section 3

A person who discloses information which he is duty-bound by Law or other statutory instrument or by order or provision issued under a Law or statutory instrument to keep secret, or if he unlawfully makes use of such secret, he shall, if the act is not otherwise specially subject to punishment, be sentenced for breach of professional confidentiality to a fine or imprisonment for at most one year. A person who through carelessness commits an act described in the first paragraph shall be sentenced to a fine. In petty cases, however, punishment shall not be imposed. (Law 1980:102)

Section 4

A person elected to a national or local government assignment involving the exercise of public authority may be removed therefrom by a court if he has committed a crime for which the punishment is imprisonment for two years or more and, through the crime, has proved manifestly unsuited for the assignment. An assignment with such other employers as are referred to in Section 2, second paragraph, point 1, shall be considered equivalent to a national or local government assignment. (Law 1988:942)

Section 5

A prosecutor may, without hindrance of other provisions which may exist, prosecute crimes through which a national or local government employee or other person referred to in Section 2,

second paragraph, points 1-4, has neglected his obligations in the exercise of his appointment or assignment. However, notwithstanding what is said in the first paragraph, the following shall apply:

1. the provisions of this Code specifying that prosecution may not take place without the authority of the Government or by a person empowered by the Government, and

2. the provisions of any other statute or statutory instrument concerning prosecution of an act for which a punishment may be imposed only if the act is committed by a holder of an appointment or assignment as defined in the first paragraph. If a crime of taking a bribe has been committed by a person not covered by the first paragraph, a prosecutor may bring an action only if the crime is reported for prosecution by the employer or principal or if prosecution is called for in the public interest. Unless otherwise prescribed for a given case, a prosecutor may prosecute a breach of professional confidentiality existing for the benefit of an aggrieved person only if the latter reports the crime for prosecution or if prosecution is called for in the public interest. Prosecution for crimes committed in the exercise of the appointment or assignment by a Member of Parliament, Minister, Justice of the Supreme Court, Justice of the Supreme Administrative Court or holder of an appointment or assignment with the Parliament or its organs is subject to separate provisions.(Law 1977:103)

Sections 6-15

Repealed (Law 1975:667)

(Entry into force on 1 July 2004)

Chapter 17

section 7

A person who gives, promises or offers a bribe or other improper reward to an employee or other person defined in Chapter 20, Section 2, for that person or for anyone else, for the exercise of official duties, shall be sentenced for bribery to a fine or imprisonment for at most two years. If the crime is gross, imprisonment for at least six months and at most six years shall be imposed.

Section 17

In some cases of bribery a public prosecutor may only prosecute if the crime is reported for prosecution by the employer or principal of the person exposed to bribery or if prosecution is called for in the public interest. This applies if bribery has been committed in relation to someone who

1. is not an employee of the State or a local authority,

2. is not defined by Chapter 20, Section 2, second paragraph, points 1-4, 8 or 9 and

3. is not a minister of a foreign state or member of the legislative assembly of a foreign state.

Chapter 20

Section 2

An employee who, for himself or herself or for anyone else, receives, accepts a promise of or demands a bribe or other improper reward for the performance of his duties, shall be sentenced for taking a bribe to a fine or imprisonment for at most two years. The same shall apply if the employee committed the act before obtaining the post or after leaving it. If the crime is gross, imprisonment for at most six years shall be imposed.

The provisions of the first paragraph in respect of an employee shall also apply to:

1. a member of a directorate, administration, board, committee or other such agency belonging to the State, a municipality, county council, association of local authorities […] or social insurance office,

2. a person who exercises a assignment regulated by statute,

3. a member of the armed forces under the Act on Disciplinary Offences by Members of the Armed Forces, etc. (1986:644), or other person performing an official duty prescribed by Law,

4. a person who, without holding an appointment or assignment as aforesaid, exercises public authority,

5. a person who, in case other than stated in points 1-4, by reason of a position of trust has been given the task of

a) managing another’s legal or financial affaires,

b) conduct a scientific investigation,

c) independently handling an assignment requiring qualified technical knowledge or

d) exercising supervision over the management of such affaires or assignment in points a, b or c,

6. a minister of a foreign state, member of the legislative assembly of a foreign state or a member

of a body of a foreign state which corresponds to those referred to in 1.

7. a person who, without holding an employment or assignment as aforesaid, exercises public authority in a foreign state or a foreign assignment as arbitrator,

8. a member of supervisory body, governing body or parliamentary assembly of a public international or supranational organisation of which Sweden is a member, and

9. a judge or official of an international court whose jurisdiction is accepted by Sweden.

Police Background Check Procedures

Who can apply?

• Resident/non-resident Swedes, as well as foreign citizens and non-citizens can apply.
• Third party representatives cannot apply.
• Prospective UK employers cannot apply

.Where?

• Local applicants must apply to their local police station or via post, fax or e-mail to the National Police Board (RPS) in Kiruna.
• Overseas applicants must apply to via post, fax or e-mail to the RPS.
• Embassies will not accept applications.

What must the applicant supply?

Local applicants:
• Must specify the need for Registry Extract for purposes in another country
• RPS 447.3b (obtainable online or at local police station)
• Full name
• 10 digit social security number
• Place/country of birth
• Permanent address, home and work telephone numbers
• E-mail address and fax number
• Delivery address
Overseas applicants:
• Must specify the need for Registry Extract for purposes in another country
• RPS 447.3b (obtainable online or at local police station)
• Full name
• 10 digit social security number
• Place/country of birth
• Permanent address, home and work telephone numbers
• E-mail address and fax number
• Delivery address E-mailed applications must contain scanned copies of birth certificate/passport or other documents containing social security number and place of birth.

What are the costs / turnaround times?

Local applicants:
• Fee and return postage which amounts to either SEK 171 (around £16) for Standard Post and SEK 221 (around £22) for Registered Post (within Sweden).

 

Overseas applicants:
• Fee and return postage which amounts to either SEK 184 (around £16) for Standard Post and SEK 249 (around £22) for Registered Post (within Europe).
Multiple copies may be requested at nominal extra fee of SEK 160 (around £14). Payment is only accepted by bank transfer, made to the RPS (Swedish National Police Board)’s account.
For payments inside Sweden, applicants should use account number 22 07 90-
0 In the case of overseas applicants, the usage of the following details is required:
IBAN number SE64 9500 0099 6034 0220 7900 BIC/SWIFT address:
NDEA SESS,
Nordea Bank AB,
105 71 Stockholm
The turn-around for the forms is around 2 weeks, but the RPS (Swedish National Police Board) advice applicants that the process will only begin once payment has been received.

Contact Details

Useful website-http://polisen.se/en/Languages/Service/Police-Record-Extracts/http://polisen.se/Service/Belastningsregistret-begar-utdrag/Rikspolisstyrelsen
Box 12256S-102 26
STOCKHOLM
Rikspolisstyrelsen
Kirunaeheten/Utlandsärende
981 81 Kiruna Sweden
Tel: (+46)8 504 451 03
Fax: (+46)8 504 451 11
Email applications: brud.rps@polisen.se

What does the certificate look like?

Extract contains the following information:
• Extract is printed
on watermarked security paper and portrays the Swedish National Police
Board logo and is signed by a civil servant.
• Swedish legalisation must be done by a notary in Sweden or by the Ministry for Foreign Affairs
in Sweden. The details are available on the police website above.
• Published in either: Swedish/English/German/French/Spanish
• The format of the returned certificate is a document that displays only conviction information.

Sweden Police Certificates

Individuals residing in Sweden may apply for a Police Certificate/Extract From the Criminal Records Registry by sending in a written request to the Swedish National Police (Rikspolisstyrelsen) in Kiruna. For application forms and instructions, please visit the Swedish National Police’s website: http://www.polisen.se/

Rikspolisstyrelsen
Utlandsutdrag/BRUD
981 81 Kiruna
Sweden
Telephone: 46 (0) 10 – 56 33501

Non-residents that need a Police Clearance Certificate can apply for it at their nearest Swedish Embassy or Consulate, or by mailing in a written request.

Privacy Laws & Regulations

The “Data Inspection Board,” also known as Datainspektionen (DIB), is the authority that oversees and enforces data protection in Sweden. Sweden has always been proactive with their protection of personal information, and legislation for protecting personal data was first introduced in 1973 with the Swedish Data Act. When the Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC was put in place by the European Union, this opportunity allowed Sweden to revisit their original legislation and update it. The original Swedish Data Act was found to be outdated, so Sweden has implemented the provisions of the data protection directive through their new Personal Data Act (Swedish Personuppgiftslagen, SFS 1998/204), and their amendments. These laws protect the way that personal data is collected and handled. It states that individuals should provide consent prior to the collection of data, unless the law suggests otherwise.

  • Data can only be collected if it is done so for relevant reasons and not in excess;
  • Data that is collected may only be used for the purpose for which is was collected;
  • Data must be up to date and accurate;
  • If the data is found to be inaccurate, it needs to be discarded and replaced with accurate data;
  • Once you are finished with the information collected, and it has fulfilled its purpose, the data must be destroyed;
  • Data that is collected must be stored in a safe location with very limited and relevant access.

Data Protection restrictions are in place for countries within the European Union (EU). They do not allow for the transfer of data to countries outside of the European Union. Due to this restriction, the Safe Harbor was created. When a company becomes Safe Harbor certified, they agree and certify that they will meet the privacy and data protection requirements set forth by the Safe Harbor Directive. Info Cubic is Safe Harbor certified, which allows us to obtain information from the EU.

Risk

Sovereign risk

The general government debt stock is forecast to remain comparatively low, peaking at around 40% of GDP in 2014. The budget deficit expanded in 2014, from 1.3% of GDP in 2013, but was still smaller than expected, at 1.7% of GDP. The Economist Intelligence Unit expects the budget deficit to shrink in 2015-16 as the recovery gathers pace, recording rising surpluses in 2017-18.

Banking sector risk

The country’s banking sector is well capitalised compared with much of the rest of the EU. The share of mortgage borrowing in banks’ loan portfolios is a concern, but tighter regulation on mortgage lending limits the associated threat to financial stability.

Political risk

A degree of political stability has been restored by the so-called “December Agreement” between Sweden’s new minority governmentled by the Social Democratic Party (SAP)and the main opposition parties to provide parliamentary support for future budgets. The Agreement removes the balance of power from the far-right Sweden Democrats (SD), who voted against the government’s budget in early December 2015, causing a government crisis.

Economic structure risk

Growth is heavily dependent on exports and the performance of Sweden’s main external markets in Europeboth are likely to improve in 2015, following signs of tentative recovery towards the end of 2014. There has also been a degree of trade reorientation towards the fast-growing US and UK markets.

Travel Risk

Security

The decision to travel is your responsibility. You are also responsible for your personal safety abroad. The purpose of this Travel Advice is to provide up-to-date information to enable you to make well-informed decisions.

Crime

The crime rate is lower in Sweden than in most European countries. Petty crime (such as pickpocketing and purse snatching) occurs in areas frequented by tourists, such as Stockholm’s Old Town and the Central Station, in restaurants and on public transportation, particularly in urban areas during the summer months. Pickpockets and purse snatchers may work in teams; one distracts the victim and another commits the robbery. Hotel lobbies and breakfast rooms attract professional, well-dressed thieves. Remain vigilant and ensure your valuables are secure at all times.

Incidences of gang and organized crime-related violence have been on the increase in southern Sweden, including in the cities of Gothenburg and Malmo, since 2014. While these incidents have not occurred in areas typically frequented by tourists, travellers should monitor local media to keep informed of the advice of local authorities. Several car bombs were reported in Malmo at the end of 2014. On March 18, 2015, an attack occurred at a restaurant in Gothenburg, killing at least two people. Monitor local media to keep informed of the current situation and follow the advice of local authorities.

Demonstrations

Demonstrations occur periodically and, while they are normally peaceful, have the potential to suddenly turn violent. Avoid all demonstrations, follow the advice of local authorities and monitor local media.

Road travel

The road network is excellent. Some roads may be closed in winter, particularly in northern areas. Consult local news and weather reports prior to travel.

Public Transportation

Taxis are available. Public transportation is convenient, reliable and punctual. Modern trains operate throughout the country. Extensive and efficient ferry services operate between Sweden and other countries in the Baltic Sea.

See Transportation Safety in order to verify if national airlines meet safety standards.

General safety information

Exercise normal safety precautions. Ensure that your personal belongings and passports and other travel documents are secure at all times.

Emergency services

Dial 112 for emergency assistance.

Know Your Customer (KYC) Rules

While Sweden is not a regional financial center, revenue and suspicious transactions increased from 2009 to 2010. According to statistics from the Swedish Financial Police, the amount of suspected money laundering transactions totaled $1.2 billion in 2010 compared with $882.8 million in 2009.

Money laundering in Sweden occurs either through individuals who use the financial system to turn over illicit funds, or with the help of corporations that use financial system services. Money laundering is further facilitated by criminals having contacts or acquaintances within, or influence over corporations and actors within the financial system. Laundered money emanates from narcotics, tax fraud, economic crimes, robbery, and organized crime. Money laundering is concentrated primarily in large urban regions, such as Stockholm, and is frequently conducted over the internet, utilizing international money transfer services, gaming sites, and narcotics and illicit chemical vending sites. Suspicious transaction reports (STRs) generally do not reference serious organized crime, although it is a growing concern. Public corruption is not an issue in Sweden.

Sweden does not have an offshore financial center. Sweden provides no offshore banking, and does not readily attract foreign criminal proceeds as it does not have especially favorable banking regulations. There is not a significant market for smuggled goods in Sweden; however, the Swedish police consider the smuggling of bulk cash to be a problem. Sweden is a member of the European Union, and money is moved freely within the union. Sweden has foreign trade zones with bonded warehouses in the ports of Stockholm, Göteborg, Malmö, and Jönköping. Goods may be stored for an unlimited time in these zones without customs clearance, but they may not be consumed or sold on a retail basis. Permission may be granted to use these goods as materials for industrial operations within a free trade zone. The same tax and labor laws apply to foreign trade zones as to other workplaces in Sweden.

KNOW-YOUR-CUSTOMER (KYC) RULES:

Enhanced due diligence procedures for PEPs:

A PEP is an abbreviation for Politically Exposed Person, a term that describes a person who has been entrusted with a prominent public function, or an individual who is closely related to such a person. The terms PEP, Politically Exposed Person and Senior Foreign Political Figure are often used interchangeably

    • Foreign PEP: YES
    • Domestic PEP: YES

Sweden – KYC covered entities

The following is a list of Know Your Customer entities covered by Swedish Law:

    • Banks
    • Insurance companies
    • Securities firms
    • Currency exchange houses, providers of electronic money, and money transfer companies
    • Accounting firms
    • Law firms and tax counselors
    • Casinos, gambling entities and lottery ticket sale outlets
    • Dealers of vehicles, art, antiques and jewelry
    • Real estate brokers

Sweden – Suspicious Transaction Reporting (STR) Requirements:

Number of STRs received and time frame: 12,218 in 2010

Number of CTRs received and time frame: Not applicable

The following is a list of STR covered entities covered by Swedish Law:

  • Independent certified public accountants
  • Tax advisors
  • Lawyers
  • Real estate agents
  • Casinos
  • Banks, life insurance and securities companies
  • Insurance brokers
  • Fund companies
  • Companies that issue electronic money
  • High value goods dealers

MONEY LAUNDERING CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS/CONVICTIONS:

Prosecutions: Not Available
Convictions: Not Available

ENFORCEMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES AND COMMENTS:

Swedish legislation dealing with money laundering exists in the Penal Code and the Money Laundering Act. In practice, predicate crimes are prosecuted, but not money laundering itself. Most often money laundering is prosecuted as tax evasion, if no other direct connection to crime is found. Many money laundering incidents involve self laundering, wherein a person tries to launder his own ill-gotten gains. In these cases only the predicate offense can be prosecuted, due to the lack of criminalization of self laundering in the Penal Code, even though it is defined as money laundering within the Money Laundering Act. The Money Laundering Act defines what is considered suspicious and should be reported to the Swedish Financial Intelligence Unit, rather than establishing criminal regulations.

The Swedish financial authority, Finansinspektionen, oversees compliance with current reporting regulations. It has the power to fine institutions and issue warnings, as well as to revoke licenses.

The FIU reports that STR filings reveal the most popular destinations for money leaving Sweden are Nigeria, Ghana, the UK, Iran, Russia, the Philippines, China, and Poland. Those countries most frequently named on STRs concerning money entering Sweden are China, Russia, the U.S., the U.A.E, Germany, Angola, Turkey, and Canada. According to the FIU, the significant increase in STR filings between 2009 and 2010 can partially be attributed to more banks utilizing detection systems for suspicious transactions, as well as an increase in the number of companies required to file reports. The biggest increase was in the credit market companies sector, which increased its STR rate from 51 in 2009 to 1,309 in 2010. STRs from remittance services also more than doubled from 1,749 reports in 2009 to 3,721 reports in 2010. Hawaladars are legally obligated to apply Swedish bookkeeping regulations.

 

Address Format

RECIPIENT
STREET_NAME HOUSE_NUMBER
POSTAL_CODE LOCALITY
SWEDEN

Sample

BJÖRN SVENSSON
ÖRINGE ERIKSLUND 5
590 15 BOXHOLM
SWEDEN

Summary

Calendar GMT Reference Actual Previous Consensus Forecast
2014-09-18 08:30 AM Q2 2.6% 1.7% (R) 1.9%
2014-11-28 08:30 AM Q3 2.1% 2.4% (R) 2.3% -0.01%
2015-02-27 08:30 AM Q4 2.7% 2.3% (R) 1.45% 1.8%
2015-05-29 08:30 AM Q1 2.7% 2.42%
2015-09-11 08:30 AM Q2
2015-11-27 08:30 AM Q3 2.29%
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