PAPUA NEW GUINEA BACKGROUND CHECK

We are providing comprehensive background verification Services which are providing you a safeguard with risk management consultancy throughout the Papua New Guinea with strong network of professional, on-ground background screeners. We are rendering our compliance pertaining to our Services of checking the veracity of the information registered under various rules and regulations and these entities can record the authentic results of the background check.

Our ultimate goal is to find the facts behind the present proposal of association to take wise decision. We are providing you the background investigation Services in all over Papua New Guinea which is also including Port Moresby, Lae, Arawa, Mount Hagen, Popondetta, Madang, Kokopo, Mendi, Kimbe, Goroka, Wewak, Bulolo, Daru, Wau, Kavieng etc. Kindly contact us on our email: info@backcheckgroup.com to generate your query and we will revert you in stipulated time accordingly. Due to the sensitive nature of the Services all queries will dealt under strict confidentiality and under the influence of extreme ethical consideration.

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Data Protection

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Part I Introductory

Division 1.—Interpretation.

1. Interpretation.

(1) In this Code, unless the contrary intention appears—”gratification” includes—

(a) money, loans, rewards or an interest in property; or

(b) an office or employment; or

(c) a payment of or release from a loan or liability; or

(d) valuable consideration of any kind; or

(e) forbearance to demand money or money’s worth; or

(f) aid, a vote, consent or influence; or

(g) a service, favour or advantage of any description whatsoever; or

(h) an offer or promise of any kind of gratification as described in Paragraphs (a) to (g) inclusive;

PART II.—Offences Against Public Order

Division 3.—Offences against the Executive and Legislative Power.

61. Member of the Parliament receiving bribes.

(1) A member of the Parliament who asks, receives or obtains, or agrees or attempts to receive or obtain, any property or benefit for himself or any other person on any understanding that his vote, opinion, judgement, or action in the Parliament, or any Committee of the Parliament will—

(a) be influenced by it; or

(b) be given in any particular manner or in favour of any particular side of any question or matter, is guilty of a crime.

Penalty: Imprisonment for a term not exceeding seven years.

(2) A person who commits an offence against Subsection (1) is disqualified from sitting or voting as a member of the Parliament for seven years.

(3) A person shall not be arrested without warrant for an offence against Subsection (1).

62. Bribery of member of the Parliament.

(1) A person who—

(a) in order—

(i) to influence a member of the Parliament in his vote, opinion, judgement or action on any question or matter arising in the Parliament or in any Committee of the Parliament; or

(ii) to induce a member to absent himself from the Parliament or from a Committee of the Parliament,

gives, confers or procures, or promises or offers to give or confer, or to procure or attempt to procure, any property or benefit to, on, or for the member, or to, on, or for, any other person; or

(b) attempts, directly or indirectly, by fraud, threats or intimidation of any kind, to influence a member of the Parliament in his vote, opinion, judgement or action on any such question or matter, or to induce him to so absent himself,

is guilty of a crime.

Penalty: Imprisonment for a term not exceeding seven years.

(2) A person shall not be arrested without warrant for an offence against Subsection (1).

(3) Where a person is convicted of an offence against this section, all property that has been tendered or produced in evidence at the trial of the offender, as being the property or part of the property which the offender in the course of the commission of the offence gave, conferred or procured, or promised or offered to give, confer or procure, or to attempt to procure, to, on, or for a member of the Parliament, or to, on, or for any other person, is forfeited to the State, whether the property is the property of the offender or of any other person.

Division 6.—Piracy.

80. Interpretation of Division 6.

(1) In this Division—

“piracy” means the act of a pirate;

“pirate” includes any person who—

(a) on the high seas commits, otherwise than as an act of war and under the authority of some foreign Prince or State, any act with respect to a ship, or any goods or merchandise belonging to a ship or laden on a ship, that, if the act were committed on land, would constitute robbery as defined in Section 384; and

(b) having on the high seas obtained possession of a ship by means of any such act, retains possession of the ship; and

(c) is declared by any law to be a pirate.

(2) A person who—

(a) at any place within the jurisdiction of the National Court commits—

(i) under colour of a commission from a foreign State or Prince, whether or not the State or Prince is at war with the Queen and Head of State; or

(ii) under pretence of authority from any person,

any act of hostility, or any act that if it were committed on land, would be robbery as defined in Section 384, against another person; or

(b) during a war adheres to or gives aid to the enemies of Papua New Guinea at any place within the jurisdiction of the National Court; or

(c) forcibly enters a ship at any place within the jurisdiction of the National Court, and throws overboard or destroys any part of the goods or merchandise belonging to the ship or laden on it; or

(d) being on board a ship at any place within the jurisdiction of the National Court—

(i) turns pirate, enemy or rebel, and piratically runs away with the ship, or any boat, ordnance, ammunition, or goods belonging to it or laden on it; or

(ii) voluntarily yields up the ship or any thing referred to in Subparagraph (i) to a pirate; or

(iii) brings a seducing message from a pirate, enemy or rebel; or

(iv) consults or conspires with, or attempts to corrupt, any master or officer of a ship, or any seaman, with intent that he should run way with or yield up any ship, goods or merchandise, turn pirate or go over to pirates; or

(v) lays violent hands on the master of the ship, with intent to hinder him from fighting in defence of the ship and goods committed to his trust; or

(vi) confines the master of the ship; or

(vii) makes, or endeavours to make, a revolt in the ship; or

(e) being on board a ship, knowingly—

(i) trades with a pirate; or

(ii) furnishes a pirate with ammunition, provisions or stores; or

(iii) fits out a ship or vessel with a design to trade with or supply, or to correspond with, a pirate; or

(iv) conspires or corresponds with a pirate,

is a pirate.

83. Aiding pirates.

A person who—

(a) brings a seducing message from a pirate; or

(b) consults or conspires with, or attempts to corrupt, any master or officer of a ship or any seaman, with intent that he should run away with or yield up any ship, goods, or merchandise, or turn pirate, or go over to pirates,

is guilty of a crime.

Penalty: Subject to Section 19, imprisonment for life.

Part III.—Offences Against The Administration Of Law And Justice And Against Public Authority

Division 2.—Corruption and Abuse of Office.

87. Official corruption.

(1) A person who—

(a) being—

(i) employed in the Public Service, or the holder of any public office; and

(ii) charged with the performance of any duty by virtue of that employment or office, (not being a duty touching the administration of justice),

corruptly asks, receives or obtains, or agrees or attempts to receive or obtain, any property or benefit for himself or any other person on account of any thing done or omitted to be done, or to be done or omitted to be done by him in the discharge of the duties of his office; or

(b) corruptly gives, confers or procures, or promises or offers to give or confer, or to procure or attempt to procure, to, on or for any person, any property or benefit on account of any such act or omission on the part of a person in the Public Service or holding a public office,

is guilty of a crime.

Penalty: Imprisonment for a term not exceeding seven years, and a fine at the discretion of the court.

(2) A person shall not be arrested without warrant for an offence against Subsection (1).

88. Extortion by public officers.

A person employed in the Public Service who takes or accepts from any person, for the performance of his duty as an officer of the Public Service any reward beyond his proper pay and emoluments, or any promise of such a reward, is guilty of a misdemeanour.

Penalty: Imprisonment for a term not exceeding three years.

89. Public officers interested in contracts.

A person employed in the Public Service who knowingly acquires or holds, directly or indirectly, otherwise than as a member of a registered joint-stock company consisting of more than 20 persons, a private interest in any contract or agreement that is made on account of the Public Service with respect to any matter concerning the Department of the Public Service in which he is employed, is guilty of a misdemeanour.

Penalty: Imprisonment for three years, and a fine at the discretion of the court.

90. Officers charged with administration of property of a special character or with special duties.

A person employed in the Public Service, who—

(a) is charged by virtue of his employment with any judicial or administrative duties respecting—

(i) any property of a special character; or

(ii) the carrying on of any manufacture, trade or business of a special character; and

(b) has acquired or holds, directly or indirectly, a private interest in any such property, manufacture, trade, or business; and

(c) discharges any such duties with respect to—

(i) the property, manufacture, trade or business in which he has the interest; or

(ii) the conduct of any person in relation to it,

is guilty of a misdemeanour.

Penalty: Imprisonment for one year, and a fine at the discretion of the court.

92. Abuse of office.

(1) A person employed in the Public Service who, in abuse of the authority of his office does, or directs to be done, any arbitrary act prejudicial to the rights of another is guilty of a misdemeanour.

Penalty: Subject to Subsection (2), imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years.

(2) If an act prohibited by Subsection (1) is done, or directed to be done, as the case may be, for purposes of gain, the offender is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding three years.

93. Corruption of valuator.

A person who, being duly appointed under any law to be a valuator for determining the compensation to be paid to any person for land compulsorily taken from him under any law, or for injury done to any land under any law—

(a) acts as valuator while he has, to his knowledge, an interest in the land in question; or

(b) executes unfaithfully, dishonestly, or with partiality, the duty of making a valuation of the land or of the extent of the injury,

is guilty of a misdemeanour.

Penalty: Imprisonment for a term not exceeding three years.

97A. Corruptly procuring withdrawal of tenders.

A person who—

(a) with intent to obtain a contract from, or provide a service to, a public body, offers a gratification to another person, to induce that person to refrain from making a tender or withdraw or alter a tender; or

(b) solicits or accepts a gratification as an inducement or reward for refraining from making a tender or withdrawing or altering a tender made for such contract,

is guilty of an offence.

Penalty: A fine at the discretion of the Court or imprisonment for a term not exceeding seven years, or both.

97B. Bribery of member of Public Service.

(1) A person who offers to a person employed in the Public Service, or being a person employed in the Public Service, solicits or accepts a gratification as an inducement or reward for—

(a) the person employed in the Public Service voting or abstaining from voting at any meeting in favour of or against any measure; or

(b) the person employed in the Public Service performing or abstaining from performing or aiding in procuring or hindering the performance of an official act; or

(c) the person employed in the Public Service aiding in procuring or preventing the passing of any vote or granting of any contract in favour of any person; or

(d) the person employed in the Public Service showing or refraining from showing any favour or disfavour in his capacity as a person employed in the Public Service,

is guilty of an offence.

Penalty: A fine at the discretion of the Court or imprisonment for a term not exceeding seven years, or both.

(2) An offence under Subsection (1) is committed notwithstanding that the person employed in the Public Service had no right or opportunity to show or refrain from showing favour or that the inducement was not in relation to the affairs of the public body.

97C. Duty of person offered gratification.

(1) A person who is corruptly offered or given a gratification shall report the offer or gift at the earliest opportunity to a commissioned police officer.

(2) A person who, without reasonable excuse, fails to comply with the provisions of Subsection (1) is guilty of an offence.

Penalty: A fine not exceeding K1,000.00 or imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months, or both.

97D. Evidentiary provisions relating to this Division.

(1) In proceedings for an offence under this Division evidence is not admissable to show that a gratification is customary in any trade, vocation or calling.

(2) A gratification received or solicited by—

(a) a relative of; or

(b) a partner, clerk or employee of,

an agent from a person having business relations with the principal of such agent, is deemed to have been received or solicited by the agent, unless the agent proves that the gratification was received without his consent or knowledge.

(3) A gratification given or offered to—

(a) a relative of; or

(b) a partner, clerk or employee of,

an agent with the consent or knowledge of the agent, or given or offered at the request of the agent to a person having business relations with the principal of the agent, is deemed to have been offered or given to the agent.

(4) In proceedings under this Division, where a person accused—

(a) is in possession of property or pecuniary resources disproportionate to his known sources of income, for which he cannot satisfactorily account; or

(b) at or about the time of the alleged offence obtained an accretion to his property or pecuniary resources for which he cannot satisfactorily account,

that fact may be—

(c) proved and taken into account by the court; and

(d) considered as corroboration of the evidence of a witness that the accused person accepted or obtained gratification as an inducement or reward.

(5) Where the resources or property referred to in Subsection (4)(a) or an accretion thereto referred to in Section (4)(b) are held by a person whose relationship to the accused gives reasonable cause for believing that he is holding the resources, property or accretion thereto in trust or as a gift from the accused, then the accused shall be deemed to be in possession of those resources or that property or that accretion thereto.

(6) Where, in any proceedings under this Act, it is proved that a gratification has been paid to or received by a person employed in the Public Service, that gratification is deemed to have been paid and received corruptly, as an inducement or reward, unless the contrary is proved.

Part III.—Offences Against The Administration Of Law And Justice And Against Public Authority.

103. Bribery.

A person who—

(a) gives, confers or procures, or promises or offers to give or confer, or to procure or attempt to procure, to, on, or for, any person any property or benefit of any kind—

(i) on account of anything done or omitted to be done, or to be done or omitted to be done, by an elector at an election in the capacity of an elector; or

(ii) on account of any person acting or joining in a procession during an election; or

(iii) in order to induce any person to endeavour to procure the return of any person at an election, or the vote of any elector at an election; or

(b) being an elector, asks, receives or obtains, or agrees or attempts to receive or obtain, any property or benefit for himself or any other person on account of anything done or omitted to be done, or to be done or omitted to be done, by him at an election in the capacity of an elector; or

(c) asks, receives or obtains, or agrees or attempts to receive or obtain, any property or benefit for himself or any other person, on account of a promise made by him or any other person to endeavour to procure the return of any person at an election, or the vote of any person at an election; or

(d) advances or pays any money to or to the use of any other person with the intent that the money will be applied for any of the purposes referred to in Paragraph (a), (b) or (c) or in discharge or repayment of money wholly or in part applied for any such purpose; or

(e) corruptly transfers or pays any property or money to any person for the purpose of enabling that person to be registered as an elector, and so influencing the vote of that person at a future election; or

(f) is privy to the transfer or payment referred to in Paragraph (e) that is made for his benefit; or

(g) being a candidate at an election, convenes or holds a meeting of electors or of his committee in a house licensed for the sale of fermented or spirituous liquors,

is guilty of a misdemeanour.

Penalty: A fine not exceeding K400.00 or imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year.

104. Further penalty for corrupt practices.

(1) A person convicted of an offence against Section 99, 100, 101, 102 or 103 committed with respect to a parliamentary election becomes incapable, for three years from the date of the conviction—

(a) of being registered as an elector or of voting at any parliamentary election or of holding any judicial office, and if he holds any such office the office is vacated; or

(b) being elected or appointed to or of sitting in the Parliament, and, if at the time of the conviction he is a member of the Parliament his seat is vacated.

(2) Any person convicted of any offence referred to in Subsection (1) committed with respect to a Local-level Government election becomes incapable, for two years from the date of the conviction, of holding any local government office, and, if he holds any such office, the office is vacated.

(It is adopted in November, 2006.)

Division 2.—The Ombudsman Commission.
217. The Ombudsman Commission.
(1) There shall be an Ombudsman Commission, consisting of a Chief Ombudsman and two Ombudsmen.
(2) The members of the Commission shall be appointed by the Head of State, acting with, and in accordance with, the advice of an Ombudsman Appointments Committee consisting of—
(a) the Prime Minister, who shall be Chairman; and

(b) the Chief Justice; and
(c) the Leader of the Opposition; and
(d) the Chairman of the appropriate Permanent Parliamentary Committee, or, if the Chairman is not a member of the Parliament who is recognized by the Parliament as being generally committed to support the Government in the Parliament, the Deputy Chairman of that Committee; and
(e) the Chairman of the Public Services Commission.
(3) The salary and other conditions of employment of the Chief Ombudsman shall not be less than or inferior to the salary and other conditions of employment of a Judge other than the Chief Justice and the Deputy Chief Justice without taking into account any conditions of employment personal to that Judge.
(4) The salary and other conditions of employment of the Ombudsmen shall be not less than or inferior to the salary and other conditions of employment of the Public Prosecutor, without taking into account any conditions of employment personal to any particular Public Prosecutor.
(5) In the performance of its functions under Section 219 (functions of the Commission) the Commission is not subject to direction or control by any person or authority.
(6) The proceedings of the Commission are not subject to review in any way, except by the supreme Court or the National Court on the ground that it has exceeded its jurisdiction.
(7) An Organic Law shall make further provision in respect of the appointment, powers, procedures and immunity of the Commission.
(8) In this section “conduct” includes—
(a) any action or inaction relating to a matter of administration; and
(b) any alleged action or inaction relating to a matter of administration.
218. Purposes of the Commission.
The purposes of the establishment of the Ombudsman Commission are—
(a) to ensure that all governmental bodies are responsive to the needs and aspirations of the People; and
(b) to help in the improvement of the work of governmental bodies and the elimination of unfairness and discrimination by them; and
(c) to help in the elimination of unfair or otherwise defective legislation and practices affecting or administered by governmental bodies; and
(d) to supervise the enforcement of Division III.2 (leadership code).
219. Functions of the Commission.
(1) Subject to this section and to any Organic Law made for the purposes of Subsection (7), the functions of the Ombudsman Commission are—
(a) to investigate, on its own initiative or on complaint by a person affected, any conduct on the part of—
(i) any State Service or provincial service, or a member of any such service; or
(ii) any other governmental body, or an officer or employee of a governmental body; or
(iii) any local government body or an officer or employee of any such body; or
(iv) any other body set up by statute—
(A) that is wholly or mainly supported out of public moneys of Papua New Guinea; or
(B) all of, or the majority of, the members of the controlling authority of which are appointed by the National Executive, or an officer or employee of any such body; and
(v) any member of the personal staff of the Governor-General, a Minister or the Leader or Deputy Leader of the Opposition; or
(vi) any other body or person prescribed for the purpose by an Act of the Parliament, specified by or under an Organic Law in the exercise of a power or function vested in it or him by law in cases where the conduct is or may be wrong, taking into account, amongst other things, the National Goals and Directive Principles, the Basic Rights and the Basic Social Obligations, and
(b) to investigate any defects in any law or administrative practice appearing from any such investigation; and
(c) to investigate, either on its own initiative or on complaint by a person affected, any case of an alleged or suspected discriminatory practice within the meaning of a law prohibiting such practices; and
(d) any functions conferred on it under Division III.2 (leadership code); and
(e) any other functions conferred upon it by or under an Organic Law.

(2) Subject to Subsections (3), (4) and (5), and without otherwise limiting the generality of the expression, for the purposes of Subsection (1)(a) conduct is wrong if it is—
(a) contrary to law; or
(b) unreasonable, unjust, oppressive or improperly discriminatory, whether or not it is in accordance with law or practice; or
(c) based wholly or partly on improper motives, irrelevant grounds or irrelevant considerations; or
(d) based wholly or partly on a mistake of law or of fact; or
(e) conduct for which reasons should be given but were not, whether or not the act was supposed to be done in the exercise of deliberate judgement within the meaning of Section 62 (decisions in “deliberate judgement”).
(3) The Commission shall not inquire into the justifiability of a policy of the National Government or a Minister or a provincial government or a member of a provincial executive, except insofar as the policy may be contrary to law or to the National Goals and Directive Principles, the Basic Rights or the Basic Social Obligations, or of any act of the Parliament.
(4) The Commission shall not inquire into the exercise of a rule-making power by a local government body.
(5) The Commission shall not inquire into a decision by a court, except insofar as the decision may show an apparent defect in law or administrative practice to which Subsection (1)(b) would apply.
(6) Except as provided by or under Division III.2 (leadership code), the Commission’s powers of enforcement are limited to publicity for its proceedings, reports and recommendations, to the making of reports and recommendations to the Parliament and other appropriate authorities as provided by an Organic Law, and to the giving of advice.
(7) An Organic Law shall make provision in respect of the powers and procedures of the Commission, and in particular—
(a) shall, subject to paragraph (b), make provision for the Commission to have access to all available relevant information; and
(b) may impose reasonable restrictions on the availability of information; and
(c) shall make provision to ensure the secrecy or confidentiality of secret or confidential information made available to the Commission or to a member of the Commission or of its staff; and
(d) may limit or restrict to a reasonable extent and in a reasonable manner the jurisdiction of the Commission in relation to any matters or class of matters, and in particular in relation to national security; and
(e) shall make provision for and in respect of publicity for the proceedings, reports and recommendations of the Commission.
(8) In this section, “conduct” includes—
(a) any action or inaction relating to a matter of administration; and
(b) any alleged action or inaction relating to a matter of administration.
220. Reports by the Commission.
(1) The Ombudsman Commission shall, at least once in each period of 12 months, at such time as is fixed by or under an Act of the Parliament or, subject to any such Act, by the Head of State, acting with, and in accordance with, the advice of the National Executive Council, give to the Head of State, for presentation to the Parliament, a report on the functions and workings of the Commission, with such recommendations as to improvement as the Commission thinks proper.
(2) Nothing in Subsection (1) prevents the Commission from making, on its own initiative or at the request of the Parliament or of the National Executive, other reports on any aspect of the functions and workings of the Commission.

Police Background Check Procedures

Who can apply?

• Anyone can apply.

Where?

• Locally at any police station to obtain the form which then, once completed and fee paid, needs to be submitted to either the Police National Forensic Science Centre or the National Criminal Records Office.
• Overseas applicants can fax the blank form over and also submit the completed one with proof of fee payment.

What must the applicant supply?

It is the same information for both local and overseas:
• Full set of finger prints
• Full copy of their current Papua New Guinea Passport
• Receipt for fee payment for the request

What are the costs / turnaround times?

• Cost is 10 Kina (approximately £2.60 www.xe.com rate 1GBP=3.86PGK) payable only in cash at the Papua New Guinea Treasury Office.
• Payee must get a payment receipt to submit with the other application documents

Contact details

Local: Police National Forensic Science
Centre
Varahe Street, Gordons,
PO Box 85, Konedobu, National
Capital District, Port Moresby, PNG
Tel: +675 325 4188/4472
Fax: +675 325 5365
Contact Person
• OIC NFS Superintendent Philip Rambaliku:
prambaliku@rpngc.gov.pg
• OIC National Fingerprint Bureau–Inspector Gasper Logoson
National Crime Records Office
Gordons, PO Box 85, Konedobu,
National Capital District,
Port Moresby, PNG
Tel: +675 322 6144/6160
Fax: +675 322 6159
Contact Person
• OIC NCRO–Chief Inspector Mark Yagen
• 2IC NCRO–Chief Sergeant Kasa Wumber

Certificate

It is available in the three official Papua New Guinea languages
• English
• Tok Pisin
• Hiri Motu

Risk

Sovereign risk

The rating remains at BB with a score of 52, but a deterioration in liquefied natural gas (LNG) export values could result in a rating downgrade to B. The government will not balance the budget in 2015-16, although it will manage to reduce the size of the fiscal deficit compared with 2014.

Banking sector risk

After years of relentless rises, local property prices have started to fall. Although a price correctionparticularly in rental marketswould increase funds for discretionary spending (and boost the wider economy), there is a risk of an increase in non-performing loans when interest rates are raised in the coming quarters.

Political risk

Political risk has increased since the issuance of an arrest warrant for the prime minister, Peter O’Neil, over alleged illegal payments. The execution of the warrant has been temporarily suspended by the Supreme Court, but, should Mr O’Neill stand down or be removed from office, a member of his People’s National Congress Party would be likely to become prime minister.

Economic structure risk

Papua New Guinea is heavily dependent on commodity exports to drive its economic growth. This reliance leaves the economy vulnerable to fluctuations in global commodity prices, especially for gold and LNG.

Travel Risk

Security

The decision to travel is your responsibility. You are also responsible for your personal safety abroad. The purpose of this Travel Advice is to provide up-to-date information to enable you to make well-informed decisions.

Bougainville Island

Be extremely cautious if you travel to the central mountainous area around the old Panguna mine on Bougainville Island. The general security situation in Bougainville has improved, however, the old Panguna mine remains a œno go zone. You may be detained by local officials if you attempt to enter this zone. Your passports may be confiscated by the Papua New Guinea government if you are found without proper authorization. There are no tourist facilities in the area, and transportation facilities are limited. Seek advice from the Australian High Commission in Port Moresby prior to travel.

Crime

Law and order remain very poor in the Highlands provinces and in the cities of Lae and Port Moresby. Violent crime is a serious problem, and occurs often in urban areas such as Port Moresby, Lae and Mount Hagen. Exercise a high degree of caution, particularly in commercial and public establishments (hotels, clubs, restaurants, bars, schools, places of worship, outdoor recreation events) and tourist areas.

Carjacking and armed robbery occur in Port Moresby and along the highway between Lae and the Nadzab Airport, especially in the Two-Mile and Nine-Mile settlement areas. There has been a recent increase in violent attacks on vehicles travelling on the Highlands Highway, particularly between Goroka and Kainantu. Remain vigilant while travelling these roads. Robberies are often accompanied by assault. Violence, including the use of firearms or machetes, is a serious risk. Avoid travel after dark if possible.

Travelling alone increases the possibility of being a victim of a crime such as robbery or sexual assault. Tolls may be demanded at illegal roadblocks and assaults can occur if payment is not made. Arrange to be met at the airport, particularly when arriving in the evening.

Women’s safety

Sexual assault, including gang rape, occurs and foreigners have been targeted. Victims of any assault are encouraged to seek immediate medical treatment. Women should not travel alone and should dress conservatively in public. Consult our publication entitled Her Own Way: A Woman’s Safe-Travel Guide for travel safety information specifically aimed at Canadian women.

Inter-ethnic violence

Inter-ethnic tensions often lead to communal violence, particularly in the Enga and Highlands provinces and in Lae and Port Moresby. Criminals and tribal fighters are increasingly using lethal weapons.

Trekking

Be vigilant if hiking the Black Cat Track, in the province of Morobe, as an attack on a group of trekkers in September 2013 left two dead and several injured.

If you are intending to walk the Kokoda track, travel with a guide from a reputable tour company and pay the required fee before setting out. Security incidents involving tourists have occurred. Facilities along the track are limited. Register with the Australian High Commission in Port Moresby prior to travel.

Demonstrations

Demonstrations occur and have the potential to suddenly turn violent. Avoid all demonstrations and large gatherings, follow the advice of local authorities and monitor local media.

Transportation

Traffic drives on the left. Road conditions are poor and driving can be hazardous, especially outside major towns. Avoid leaving personal belongings unattended in vehicles, and drive with windows up and doors locked at all times.

If you are involved in a traffic accident, proceed directly to the nearest police station rather than remaining at the scene. Crowds tend to form quickly after an incident, and accident victims or on-lookers may attack those they perceive to be responsible.

Travel on public buses, known as PMVs (public motor vehicles), is not recommended. The vehicles are poorly maintained and are a common target for criminals. Travel by taxi is preferable; however, determine your fare prior to departure. Hotel transport is a safer alternative.

Flight delays or cancellations occur on a regular basis. Verify your flight schedule before departure.

See Transportation Safety in order to verify if national airlines meet safety standards.

General safety information

Tourist facilities are available in Port Moresby, Lae and Madang. Exercise caution when visiting isolated public areas such as parks, hiking trails, golf courses and beaches.

You are encouraged to register with the High Commission of Australia in Port Moresby in order to receive the latest information on situations and events that could affect your safety.

Address Format

RECIPIENT

P.O. Box OFFICE_BOX_NUMBER
LOCALITY POSTAL_CODE PROVINCE
PAPUA NEW GUINEA

Sample

James Bai
P.O. Box 251
KUNDIAWA 461 Chimbu
PAPUA NEW GUINEA

Summary

Papua New Guinea GDP Last Previous Highest Lowest Unit
GDP 15.29 15.65 15.65 0.23 USD Billion
GDP Annual Growth Rate 5.10 8.00 11.10 -6.34 percent
GDP per capita 1110.61 1076.38 1110.61 546.39 USD
GDP per capita PPP 2457.63 2381.90 2457.63 1610.49 USD
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