NORWAY BACKGROUND CHECK

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eneral Information

GDP USD500.103bn (World ranking 27, World Bank 2014)
Population 5.14 million (World ranking 117, World Bank 2014)
Form of state Constitutional Monarchy
Head of government Erna SOLBERG
Next elections 2017, legislative

 

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PRODUCTS IN NORWAY

Data Protection

Contribution Details

Nils arne Grønlie

Partner

Law

A contracting party to the European Economic Area (“EEA”) Agreement, Norway implemented the EU Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC in April 2000 with the Personal Data Act 2000 (“Act”). Enforcement is through the Data Protection Authority (“DPA”).

Definition of Personal Data

Any information and assessments that may be linked to a natural person (the Act section 2, number 1).

Definition of sensitive Personal Data

Information relating to a) racial or ethnic origin, or political opinions, philosophical or religious beliefs, b) the fact that a person has been suspected of, charged with, indicted for or convicted of a criminal act, c) health, d) sex life, or e) trade union membership (the Act section 8).

National Data Protection Authority

The Data Protection Agency

Registration

Unless an exemption applies, data controllers who process personal data by automatic means must notify the DPA so that their processing of personal data may be registered and made public. Changes to the processing of personal data will require the notification to be amended and a new notification shall in any event be given three years after the previous notification was given.

The notification shall, inter alia, include the following information (as outlined in the DPA’s standard electronic notification form):

■     the purpose(s) of the processing;

■     the controller’s contact details and sector;

■     whether sensitive personal data are processed;

■     whether a data processor processes data on behalf of the controller; and

■     whether the data will be transferred outside the EEA.

Data Protection officers

There is no requirement in Norway for organizations to appoint a data protection officer.

Collection and Processing

Data controllers may collect and process personal data when any of the following conditions

are met:

■     the data subject consents;

■     there is statutory authority for the processing;

■     the processing is necessary to fulfill a contract to which the data subject is party, or to take

steps at the request of the data subject prior to entering into such a contract;

■     the processing is necessary to enable the controller to fulfill a legal obligation;

■     the processing is necessary to protect the vital interests of the data subject;

■     the processing is necessary to perform a task in the public interest;

■     the processing is necessary to exercise official authority, or

■     the processing is necessary to enable the controller or third parties to whom the data is disclosed to protect a legitimate interest, except where such interest is overridden by the interests of the data subject.

Where sensitive personal data is processed, one of the above conditions must be met plus one of

a further list of additional conditions.

Whichever of the above conditions is relied upon, the controller must first provide the data subject with certain information, unless an exemption applies. The notification shall include information on the identity of the controller, the purposes of the processing, whether the data will be disclosed and if so, the identity of the controller, the fact that the provision of data is voluntary and any other circumstances that will enable the data subject to exercise his rights pursuant to the Act.

Transfer

Data controllers may transfer personal data out of the EEA if any of the following conditions are met:

■     the data subject has consented to the transfer;

■     there is an obligation to transfer the data pursuant to an international agreement or as a result of membership of an international organization;

■     the transfer is necessary for the performance of a contract with the data subject, or for the

performance of tasks at the request of the data subject prior to entering into such a contract;

■     the transfer is necessary for the conclusion or performance of a contract with a third party in

the interest of the data subject;

■     the transfer is necessary in order to protect the vital interests of the data subject;

■     the transfer is necessary on order to establish, exercise or defend a legal claim; or

■     the transfer is necessary or legally required in order to protect an important public interest, or there is statutory authority for demanding data from a public register.

The DPA may allow transfers even if the above conditions are not fulfilled if the data controller provides adequate safeguards with respect to the protection of the rights of the data subject.

Transfer of a data subject’s personal data to non EU/EEA countries is allowed if the countries provide adequate protection for the security of the data, or if the transfer is covered by standard contractual clauses approved by the European Commission, or subject to an organization’s Binding Corporate Rules. Countries which have implemented Directive 95/46/EC meet the requirement as regards an adequate level of protection.

Transferors are required to seek permission from the DPA for any transfers of personal data;

(i) not based on the conditions above; (ii) to countries outside the EEA; or which do not have an adequate protection level; or (iii) to entities (outside the jurisdictions mentioned in (ii)) which do not have Binding Corporate Rules or are not a member of the US Safe Harbor scheme.

(the Act section 30 second paragraph).

For transfer of data to the United States, compliance with the US/EU Safe Harbor principles satisfies the requirements of Norway’s transfer law.

Security

Data controllers and processors shall by means of planned, systematic measures ensure satisfactory data security with regard to confidentiality, integrity and accessibility in connection with the processing of personal data.

Breach Notification

Data security breaches which have resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of personal data where confidentiality is necessary, is subject to notification to the DPA. DPA guidance and practice indicates that data subjects may need to be notified provided the discrepancy may be

detrimental to the interests of the data subject (e.g identity theft, forgery, harassment).

Enforcement

The DPA is responsible for enforcement of the Act, and DPA’s decisions may be appealed to the Privacy Appeals Board (Nw: Personvernnemnda). If the DPA becomes aware that a data controller is in breach of the Act, it may issue an order requiring the controller to rectify the position. In connection with orders, the DPA may impose a coercive fine which will run for each day from the expiry of the time limit set for compliance with the order until the order has been complied with.

Failure to comply with an order is a criminal offence and may be punished with fines or imprisonment.

The DPA may also issue fines (Data Offence Fines) up to a maximum of 10 times the National Insurance Basic Amount (approx. EUR 90,000). Physical persons may only be fined for a data offence for deliberate or negligent violation. A business may not be fined for a data offence for a violation that is due to factors outside the control of the business. In evaluating whether to impose a data offence fine and in determining its size, special consideration will be given to:

■     how seriously the violation has infringed the interests the Act is designed to protect;

■     the degree of culpability;

■     whether the violator could, by guidelines, instructions, training, inspection or other

measures, have mitigated the violation;

■     whether the violation was committed to promote the violators interests;

■     whether the violator has, or could have, achieved any benefit from the violation;

■     whether this is a repeat violation;

■     whether other sanctions following from the violation are imposed on the violator, or a person acting on his behalf, for instance punishment of a person for a criminal offence, and

■     the violator’s financial capacity.

The controller shall compensate damage suffered as a result of the fact that personal data have been processed contrary to the provisions of the Act, unless the damage is not due to error or neglect on the part of the controller.

Electronic Marketing

The Act will apply to most electronic marketing activities, as there is likely to be processing and use of personal data involved (e.g. an email address is likely to be “personal data” for the purposes of the Act).

Pursuant to the Marketing Control Act (Nw: Markedsføringsloven) section 15, it is prohibited in the course of trade, without the prior consent of the recipient, to send marketing communications to natural persons using electronic methods of communication which permit individual communication, such as electronic mail, telefax or automated calling systems (calling machines).

Prior consent is however not required for electronic mail marketing where there is an existing customer relationship and the contracting trader has obtained the electronic address of the customer in connection with a sale. The marketing may only relate to the trader’s own goods, services or other products corresponding to those on which the customer relationship is based.

At the time that the electronic address is obtained, and at the time of any subsequent marketing communication, the customer shall be given a simple and free opportunity to opt out of receiving such communications.

“Electronic mail” in the context of the Marketing Control Act means any communication in the form of text, speech, sound or image that is sent via an electronic communications network, and that can be stored on the network or in the terminal equipment of the recipient until the recipient retrieves it. This includes text and multimedia messages sent to mobile telephones.

Direct marketing emails must not conceal or disguise the identity of the sender. If the email is unsolicited, it shall clearly state that the email contains a marketing message. upon reception of the message (The Norwegian E-commerce Act, Nw: Ehandelsloven, section 9).

Online Privacy (including cookies and Location Data)

Traffic Data – Traffic data is defined in Norwegian Regulation relating to Electronic Communications Networks and Electronic Communications Services (Nw: Ekomforskriften F16.02.2004 nr 401) section 7-1 as data which is necessary to transfer communication in an electronic communications network or for billing of such transfer services.

Processing of traffic data held by a Communications Services Provider (“CSP”) (Nw: Tilbyder) may only be performed by individuals tasked with invoicing, traffic management, customer enquiries, marketing of electronic communications networks or the prevention or detection of fraud.

Traffic Data held by a CSP must be erased or anonymised when it is no longer necessary for the purpose of the transmission of a communication (Electronic Communications Act section 2-7 (Nw: Ekomloven). However, Traffic Data can be retained if it is being used to provide a value added service and consent has been given for the retention of the Traffic Data.

Location Data – Location data may only be processed subject to explicit consent for the provision of a value added service which is not a public telephony service, and the users must be given understandable information on which data is processed and how the data is used. The user shall have the opportunity to withdraw her consent. See Norwegian Regulation relating to Electronic Communications Networks and Electronic Communications Services section 7-2.

Cookie Compliance – The Norwegian Regulation relating to Electronic Communications Networks and Electronic Communications Services section § 7-3, requires that information about the use of cookies is provided to the users in accordance with the Act, including the purpose of the processing and that they are given an opportunity to object to the processing, i.e. opt-out.

Regardless of this, the use of cookies for technical storage or access to information is allowed if this is done solely for the purpose of transferring or easing the transfer of communication, or if this is necessary to provide an information society service pursuant to the user’s explicit consent. The amended E-Privacy Directive, requiring opt-in for cookies, has not been implemented into

Norwegian law yet albeit there is a proposed amendment currently in process. The proposed

amendment to Norwegian law seems to be in line with the amended E-Privacy Directive.

Chapter 26 – Fraud, breach of trust and corruption

Section 276 a. Any person who:

a) for himself or other persons requests or receives an improper advantage or accepts an offer thereof in connection with a position, office or assignment, or

b) gives or offers any person an improper advantage in connection with a position, office or assignment shall be liable to a penalty for corruption.

Position, office or assignment in the first paragraph also mean a position, office or assignment in a foreign country.

The penalty for corruption shall be fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding three years. Any person who aids and abets such an offence shall be liable to the same penalty.

Section 276 b. Gross corruption shall be punishable by imprisonment for a term not exceeding 10 years. Any person who aids and abets such an offence shall be liable to the same penalty.

In deciding whether the corruption is gross, importance shall be attached to, inter alia, whether the act has been committed by or in relation to a public official or any other person in breach of the special confidence placed in him by virtue of his position, office or assignment, whether it has resulted in a considerable economic advantage, whether there is any risk of considerable damage of an economic or other nature, or whether false accounting information has been recorded, or false accounting documents or false annual accounts have been prepared.

Section 276 c. Any person who

a) for himself or other persons requests or received an improper advantage or accepts an offer thereof in return for influencing the conduct of any position, office or assignment, or

b) gives or offers any person an improper advantage in return for influencing the conduct of a position, office or assignment

shall be liable for trading in influence.

Position, office or assignment in the first paragraph also mean a position, office or assignment in a foreign country.

Trading in influence shall be punishable by fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding three years. Any personwho aids and abets such an offence shall be liable to the same penalty.

(Extract)

(Act of 22 May 1902 No. 10 as subsequently amended, most recently by Act of 1 July 1994 No. 50)

PART II FELONIES

Chapter 24. Embezzlement, theft, and unlawful use

§ 255. Any person shall be guilty of embezzlement who for the purpose of obtaining for himself or another an unlawful gain illegally disposes of, mortgages, consumes or otherwise appropriates any chattel which is in his possession, but which wholly or partly belongs to another, or who unlawfully disposes of money which he has collected for another or which is otherwise entrusted to him.

No penalty pursuant to this section shall be imposed for any act that comes under section 277 or 278.

The penalty for embezzlement is fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding three years. The penalty for aiding and abetting is the same.

§ 256. The penalty for gross embezzlement is imprisonment for a term not exceeding six years. The penalty for aiding and abetting is the same.

In deciding whether the embezzlement is gross, special regard shall be paid to whether the value of the object embezzled is considerable, whether the embezzlement has been committed by a public official or any other person in breach of the special confidence placed in him as a consequence of his position or activity, whether false accounts or books have been kept, or whether the offender has knowingly caused material loss or danger to another’s life or health.

(Passed on 22 May 1902, amended on 15 June 2005)

§ 67. The period of limitation is:

-two years when the maximum penalty prescribed is fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year,

-five years when the maximum penalty prescribed is imprisonment for a term not exceeding four years,

-10 years when the maximum penalty prescribed is imprisonment for a term not exceeding 10 years,

-15 years when a penalty for a specified period not exceeding 15 years may be imposed -25 years when imprisonment for a term not exceeding 21 years may be imposed.

Detention is deemed to be equivalent to imprisonment when calculating the limitation period.

The fact that fines or loss of civil rights may be imposed in addition to another penalty is of no significance when calculating the limitation period.

If any person has by the same act committed two or more offences which pursuant to the first paragraph should become time -barred at different times, the longest period of limitation shall apply to all the offences.

The period of limitation of criminal liability applicable to enterprises shall be calculated on the basis of the penalty scale for individual persons in the penal provision that has been contravened.

§ 68. The period of limitation begins to run from the date the criminal activity has ceased.

When criminal liability is dependent on or influenced by a subsequent effect, the period of limitation does not begin to run until the date on which such effect occurs. The same applies when the prosecution is dependent on the occurrence of a subsequent event.

If the criminal act is committed on a Norwegian ship outside the realm, the period of limitation begins to run from the date the ship arrives at a Norwegian port. The commencement date of the period of limitation cannot pursuant to this provision be postponed for more than one year.

§ 105. Any person who by threats, by doing or promising a favour, by false inducements or by other improper means seeks to influence another person’s behaviour or voting in public affairs or to prevent another person from voting, or who is accessory thereto, shall be liable to detention for a term not exceeding three years. Under especially extenuating circumstances, fines may be imposed.

§ 106. Any person who when voting in public affairs votes in a certain way or abstains from voting or promises to vote in a certain way or to abstain from voting because of any favour agreed upon or received shall be liable to fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months.

§ 111. If a public servant demands for himself or another public servant or for the public authorities any unlawful tax, duty or remuneration for services rendered or receives what is mistakenly offered to him as due in this respect, he shall be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years.

If he keeps what he has received in good faith after his attention has been drawn to the mistake, he shall be liable to fines, loss of office, or imprisonment for a term not exceeding three months

§ 112. A public servant who for the performance or omission of an official act demands or receives for himself or another any unlawful favour or promise thereof, knowing that this is given or promised to influence his conduct in his official capacity, shall be liable to fines, loss of office, or imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months.

§ 113. If the act or omission referred to in section 112 for which the favour was received or promised was in breach of duty, or if the public servant has refused to perform an official act in order to extort such a favour for himself or another, he shall be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years.

The same penalty shall apply to any person who receives a favour knowing that it is given to him in return for having performed an official act in breach of his duty.

§ 114. If a judge, juror, assessor, or expert demands or receives for himself or another any unlawful favour or the promise thereof for acting or having acted in such capacity for or against the interests of any of the parties to a legal dispute, he shall be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding eight years.

These provisions also apply to arbitrators if the arbitration award has the force of a court judgment.

§ 121. Any person who wilfully or through gross negligence violates a duty of secrecy which in accordance with any statutory provision or valid dire ctive is a consequence of his service or work for any state or municipal body shall be liable to fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months.

If he commits such breach of duty for the purpose of acquiring for himself or another person an unlawful gain or if for such a purpose he in any other way uses information that is subject to a duty of secrecy, imprisonment for a term not exceeding three years may be imposed.

This provision also applies to any breach of the duty of secrecy committed after the person concerned has concluded his service or work.

§ 123. If a public servant misuses his position so as to violate any person’s right by performing or omitting to perform an official act, he shall be liable to fines or to loss of office or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year.

If he has acted for the purpose of obtaining an unlawful gain for himself or another person, or if serious injury or violation of rights has been wilfully caused by the felony, imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years may be imposed.

§ 128. Any person who by threats or by granting or promising a favour seeks to induce a public servant illegally to perform or omit to perform an official act, or who is accessory thereto, shall be liable to fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year.

The term public servant in the first paragraph also includes foreign public servants and servants of public international organisations.

The provisions of the previous section, third and fourth paragraphs, shall apply correspondingly.

§ 255. Any person shall be guilty of embezzlement who for the purpose of obtaining for himself or another an unlawful gain illegally disposes of, mortgages, consumes or otherwise appropriates any chattel which is in his possession, but which wholly or partly belongs to another, or who unlawfully disposes of money which he has collected for another or which is otherwise entrusted to him.

No penalty pursuant to this section shall be imposed for any act that comes under section 277 or 278.

The penalty for embezzlement is fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding three years. The penalty for aiding and abetting is the same.

§ 256. The penalty for gross embezzlement is imprisonment for a term not exceeding six years. The penalty for aiding and abetting is the same.

In deciding whether the embezzlement is gross, special regard shall be paid to whether the value of the object embezzled is considerable, whether the embezzlement has been committed by a public official or any other person in breach of the special confidence placed in him as a consequence of his position or activity, whether false accounts or books have been kept, or whether the offender has knowingly caused material loss or danger to another’s life or health.

§ 275. Any person who, for the purpose of obtaining for himself or another an unlawful gain or inflicting damage, neglects another person’s affairs which he manages or supervises or acts against the other person’s interests shall be guilty of breach of trust.

The penalty for breach of trust is imprisonment for a term not exceeding three years. Fines may be imposed in addition to a sentence of imprisonment. An accomplice shall be liable to the same penalty. Under especially extenuating circumstances fines alone may be imposed.

A penalty pursuant to this section shall not be applicable to an act that comes under section 255, cf. section 256.

§ 276. The penalty for gross breach of trust is imprisonment for a term not exceeding six years. Fines may be imposed in addition to a sentence of imprisonment. An accomplice shall be liable to the same penalty.

In deciding whether a breach of trust is gross, special regard shall be paid to whether the act has caused considerable economic damage, whether it has been committed by a public official or any other person by a breach of the special confidence placed in him as a consequence of his position or activity, whether the offender has kept false accounts or books or has destroyed, damaged, or concealed accounts, books or other documents, or whether he has knowingly caused material loss or danger to another person’s life or health.

§ 286. Any person who wilfully or negligently essentially disregards provisions relating to book-keeping, making annual financial statements, or keeping accounts, laid down in any Act or regulations made pursuant to an Act, shall be liable to fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year or to both.

If there are especially aggravating circumstances, imprisonment for a term not exceeding three years may be imposed.

§ 317. Any person who receives or obtains for himself or another person any part of the proceeds of a criminal act, or who aids and abets the securing of such proceeds for another person shall be guilty of an offence20 and shall be liable to fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding three years. Aiding and abetting shall be deemed to include collecting, storing, concealing, transporting, sending, transferring, converting, disposing of, pledging or mortgaging, or investing the proceeds. Any object, claim or service substituted for the proceeds shall be regarded as equivalent thereto.

Such offence takes place even though no person may be punished for the act from which the proceeds are derived, by reason of the provisions of sections 33 and 46.

An aggravated offence shall be punishable with imprisonment for a term not exceeding six years. In deciding whether an offence is aggravated, special importance shall be attached to what kind of criminal act the proceeds are derived from, the value of the proceeds that the offender has been concerned with, the amount of any advantage the offender has received or obtained for himself or another person, and whether the offender has habitually been engaged in such offences. If the proceeds are derived from a drug offence, importance shall also be attached to the nature and quantity of the substance with which the proceeds are connected.

If the offence is concerned with the proceeds of a drug offence, imprisonment for a term not exceeding 21 years may be imposed under especially aggravating circumstances.

If the offence is committed by negligence, it shall be punishable by fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years.

No penalty pursuant to this section shall, however, be applicable to any person who receives the proceeds for the ordinary maintenance of himself or another person from a person who is obliged to provide such maintenance, or to any person who receives the proceeds as normal payment for ordinary consumer goods, articles for everyday use or services.

§ 373. Any person shall be liable to fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding three months who in the administration of an estate or in an enterprise in which decisions are made by a majority vote unjustly offers or does any person a special favour, or receives for himself or another any such favour or promise thereof for voting in a certain way, fraudulently gains access to unauthorized participation in voting or to casting more votes than he is entitled to, or who is accessory thereto, or causes the result of a vote to be distorted, or is accessory thereto.

§ 401. Any person who for the purpose of obtaining an unlawful gain for himself or another person seeks to restrain or prevent other persons from bidding at a public sale or purchase by spreading false notions, by gifts or similar conduct, or who is accessory thereto, shall be liable to fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding four months.

§ 405. Any person who, in cases where the price of a commodity or the remuneration for work or services rendered is lawfully fixed by some public authority, demands or receives a payment higher than that prescribed shall be liable to fines, but in the case of repeated offences to fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding three months.

20The Norwegian legal term for this offence is heleri.

The same penalty shall apply to any person who in any agreement stipulates for himself an advantage which it is prohibited to include in a contract.

§ 405 a. Any person who unfairly obtains or attempts to obtain knowledge or control of a trade secret shall be liable to fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding three months.

§ 405 b. If any person who is employed by or acts as attorney for another without the latter’s knowledge demands or receives a gift or any other advantage or promise thereof from a tradesman or any person on his behalf in order to give or procure for the said tradesman an unjustified advantage in regard to the supply of goods, work, or other services, he shall be liable to fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding three months.

Police Background Check Procedures

Who can apply?

•  Individuals only.
•  Prospective employers and third party representatives cannot apply.

Where?

•  Local and overseas applicants must apply to their local police station or county police district, inwhich they are/were residing for the longest period of time.
•  Local applicants must apply in person.
•  Overseas applicants must apply through post.
•  Embassy/Consulate will not accept applications.

What must the applicant supply?

Choice of (must state in application):
•  Standard/Ordinary Certificate (relating to fines and convictions)
•  Limited Certificate (relating to offences against children and vulnerable adults)
Applicants must supply:
•  Full name (including previous family names)
•  Current address
•  Address history for past 5 years
•  Date and place of birth
•  Social Security number
•  Copy of passport bio data page
•  Occupation title
•  Place of work and contact number
•  Purpose for certificate (state “pre-employment screening”)
•  Signature
•  Overseas applicants should state when and how long they resided in Norway on an
accompanying document

What are the costs / turnaround times?

•  Free of charge
•  Turnaround of 3-14 days
•  No fast track service available
•  Only one copy of the certificate will be issued

Contact Details

Local police stations:https://www.politi.no/kontakt_oss/kontakt_ditt_politidistrikt/
(Norwegian only)
Applicants in the UK should apply to the Norwegian Embassy. Until they hold more information about the criminal record certificate you should have the documentation verified by your Embassy before sending it in with your licence application.
Embassy of Norway
25 Belgrave Square
London
SW1X 8QD
Tel: 020 7591 5500
Fax: 020 7245 6993

Norway – Know Your Customer (KYC) Rules

Although it is a high income country, Norway is not considered a regional financial center. Norway‘s significance in terms of money laundering is low. There are illicit proceeds related to narcotics sales and production, prostitution, robberies, smuggling, and white collar crimes like embezzlement, tax evasion and fraud. Criminal proceeds laundered in the jurisdiction derive primarily from domestic criminal activity, often by foreign criminal gangs or guest workers who in turn remit the proceeds home.

KNOW-YOUR-CUSTOMER (KYC) RULES:

Enhanced due diligence procedures for PEPs:

A PEP is an abbreviation for Politically Exposed Person, a term that describes a person who has been entrusted with a prominent public function, or an individual who is closely related to such a person. The terms PEP, Politically Exposed Person and Senior Foreign Political Figure are often used interchangeably

    • Foreign PEP: YES
    • Domestic PEP: YES

Norway – KYC covered entities

The following is a list of Know Your Customer entities covered by Norwegian Law:

    • Banks
    • The Central Bank
    • Finance companies
    • e-money institutions
    • Pension funds
    • Postal operators
    • Auditors
    • Asset managers
    • Securities dealers
    • Credit agents
    • Money exchangers
    • Insurance companies
    • Accountants
    • Lawyers
    • Notaries
    • Auction houses
    • Realtors
    • Money transporters
    • Holding houses
    • Dealers in autos and high value goods

Norway – Suspicious Transaction Reporting (STR) Requirements:

Number of STRs received and time frame: 6,660 in 2010

Number of CTRs received and time frame: 3,734 in 2010

The following is a list of STR covered entities covered by Norwegian Law:

    • Banks
    • The Central Bank
    • Finance companies
    • e-money institutions
    • Pension funds
    • Postal operators
    • Auditors
    • Asset managers
    • Securities dealers
    • Credit agents
    • Money exchangers
    • Insurance companies
    • Accountants
    • Lawyers
    • Notaries
    • Auction houses
    • Realtors
    • Money transporters
    • Holding houses
    • Dealers in autos and high value goods

MONEY LAUNDERING CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS/CONVICTIONS:

Prosecutions: Not available
Convictions: Not available

ENFORCEMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES AND COMMENTS:

The Norwegian financial intelligence unit (FIU) voices some concern over the low number and poor quality of reports from certain entities covered by the reporting obligation. Banks, auditors, insurance companies and payment transfer entities maintain high levels of reporting, while reports from other industries, such as dealers in cars and other expensive items, are few and decreasing. Reporting from attorneys is up, but is low compared to the high number of transactions conducted by this sector. Given the overall transaction volume, the FIU suspects considerable underreporting in these sectors. The FIU is attempting to improve the quality of STR reporting by providing specific guidance and follow up to obligated entities. In 2010, the FIU reported 122 incidents to the National Police Intelligence System and submitted 23 formal complaints and reports to be used in criminal cases. Although aggregate data is not available, the number of money laundering prosecutions and convictions is believed to be low given the size of the Norwegian economy.

In addition to Norway‘s large currency transaction reporting requirement a purpose declaration is required for currency transactions over NOK 100,000 (approximately $17,900).

Norwegian police agencies share responsibility for identifying, tracing, freezing, seizing, and forfeiting narcotics and terrorist financing related assets. As a general rule, the police may seize direct proceeds from criminal acts. Norwegian law also allows for seizing instruments of crime, but a relationship to the crime must be proven. Norwegian law allows both criminal and civil forfeiture.

Risk

Sovereign risk

Over the past few years, the stock of public debt has been rising steadily and now stands at the equivalent of 44.1% of GDP. The lower international oil price will result in a further rise in the public debt ratio in 2015-16, to a projected 58.4% of GDP in 2016, as automatic stabilisers come into effect and revenue falls. Norway’s ability to service its debt will not be in question given the large sovereign wealth fund.

Banking sector risk

Direct exposure to distressed sovereign debt is low, but banks’ shipping and commercial property exposures are sensitive to global growth. Household debt, fuelled by low interest rates, also gives some cause for concern. However, risks are mitigated by low unemployment and high savings.

Political risk

Risks to political stability are limited, hence Norway’s triple-A rating in this category. Norway’s tradition of well-functioning minority administrations and broad political consensus among the country’s main parties will continue to underpin political stability.

Economic structure risk

The impact of the petroleum sector on the exchange rate makes the non-hydrocarbon economy less competitive, although this is mitigated by keeping much petroleum revenue in offshore investments.

Travel Risk

Security

The decision to travel is your responsibility. You are also responsible for your personal safety abroad. The purpose of this Travel Advice is to provide up-to-date information to enable you to make well-informed decisions.

Crime

Even though the crime rate is low, petty crime (pickpocketing and purse snatching) occurs, especially in the summer tourist season from May to September. Remain vigilant in public places and tourist areas, including airports, train and bus stations, restaurants and hotels.

Avoid poorly lit areas, especially the streets behind Oslo’s Central (railway) Station after dark.

There has been an increase of rape and assault in Oslo. Authorities have increased the frequency of patrols and have made arrests. Remain highly vigilant, particularly at night and when clubs and pubs are closing. Avoid walking alone through parks and poorly lit areas of the city. Do not, under any circumstances, use “pirate taxis” or other unofficial transportation.

Terrorism

The Government of Norway maintains a public alert system on terrorism. Visit the website of the Norwegian Police Security Services for more information. Continue to exercise normal security precautions.

Road safety

Narrow and winding roads may be hazardous and impassable, especially in winter and in mountainous areas. Observe posted speed limits and keep headlights on at all times. Respect signs showing animal crossings, especially for moose.

Public Transportation

Public transportation services are efficient and reliable. Use only officially marked taxis, particularly in Oslo.

See Transportation Safety in order to verify if national airlines meet safety standards.

fraud

Automated banking machine (ABM) card and credit card fraud occurs. Before using your card, carefully inspect the ABM to ensure that it has not been tampered with. One scam involves a unit placed on top of the card reader and then personal information, including the PIN, is used to access accounts.

See our Overseas Fraud page for more information on scams abroad.

Mountain activities

If you intend to do mountaineering, glacier climbing or ski touring:

a) never practice these activities alone;

b) always hire an experienced guide from a reputable company;

c) buy travel health insurance that includes helicopter rescue and medical evacuation;

d) ensure that you are in top physical condition;

e) ensure that you are properly equipped;

f) advise a family member or friend of your destination, itinerary and when you expect to be back;

g) know the symptoms of acute altitude sickness, which can be fatal;

h) register with the Embassy of Canada in Norway;

i) obtain detailed information on trekking routes or ski slopes before setting out, and do not venture off established trails, especially in early or late winter because of the possibility of snow avalanches occurring due to warming weather conditions;

j) ensure that you are well informed about weather and other conditions, such as snow, before you set-off on a trip.

Consider using modern communications tools, such as a mobile telephone or GPS tracking system, which can assist emergency response units in locating stranded travellers. Bring other safety devices such as a back-plate, a helmet and a spade for digging snow. If you feel that it is dangerous, remember that it is never too late to turn back.

General safety measures

Exercise normal safety precautions. Ensure that your personal belongings, passports and other travel documents are secure at all times.

Emergency services

Dial 112 to reach police, 113 to reach ambulance and 110 to reach fire fighters.

Address Format

RECIPIENT

[STREET_NAME HOUSE_NUMBER]
POSTAL_CODE LOCALITY
NORWAY

Sample

Harald Stoltenberg
Sons gate 20
0654 OSLO
NORWAY

Summary

Calendar GMT Reference Actual Previous Consensus Forecast
2014-08-21 09:00 AM Q2 -0.3% 3.9% 1.59%
2014-11-20 09:00 AM Q3 2.1% 0.0% (R) 1.53%
2015-02-11 09:00 AM Q4 3.2% 1.8% (R) 1.8%
2015-05-20 09:00 AM Q1 3.2% 1.6%
2015-08-20 09:00 AM Q2 1.16%
2015-11-17 09:00 AM Q3 1.25%

 

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