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Our ultimate goal is to find the facts behind the present proposal of association to take wise decision. We are providing you the background investigation Services in all over Malaysia which is also including George Town, Kuala Lumpur, Ipoh, Kuching, Johor Bahru, Kota Kinabalu, Shah Alam, Malacca Town, Miri, Petaling Jaya, Kuala Terengganu etc. Kindly contact us on our email: info@backcheckgroup.com to generate your query and we will revert you in stipulated time accordingly.

Due to the sensitive nature of the Services all queries will dealt under strict confidentiality and under the influence of extreme ethical consideration.

General Information

GDP USD326.9bn (World ranking 35, World Bank 2014)
Population 30.2 million (World ranking 44, World Bank 2014)
Form of state Constitutional Monarchy
Head of government Mohamed NAJIB bin Abdul Najib Razak (UMNO party)
Next elections 2018, legislative

 

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PRODUCTS IN MALAYSIA

Data Protection

Malaysia

Contribution Details

Zaid Ibrahim & Co Level 19 Menara Millennium Pusat bandar Damansara

50490 Kuala Lumpur

Sharon tan

Partner

Law

At present, Malaysia does not have any comprehensive data protection law in force. In the absence of an overarching protection of personal information, obligations of secrecy have been imposed in a piecemeal manner by statute or industry codes in specific circumstances.

Confidentiality of information is usually protected using contractual obligations or the common law of confidence.

However, this situation will soon change. Malaysia’s first comprehensive personal data protection legislation, the Personal Data Protection Act 2010 (“PDPA”), has been passed by the Malaysian Parliament. However, at the time of writing, no date has been set for the PDPA to come into force.

Definition of Personal Data

Personal data” means any information in respect of commercial transactions, which:

  • is being processed wholly or partly by means of equipment operating automatically in response to instructions given for that purpose;
  • is recorded with the intention that it should wholly or partly be processed by means of such equipment; or
  • is recorded as part of a relevant filing system or with the intention that it should form part of a relevant filing system,

that relates directly or indirectly to a data subject, who is identified or identifiable from that information or from that and other information in the possession of a data user, including any sensitive personal data and expression of opinion about the data subject; but does not include any information that is processed for the purpose of a credit reporting business carried on by a credit reporting agency under the Credit Reporting Agencies Act 2010.

Definition of Sensitive Personal Data

Sensitive personal data” means any personal data consisting of information as to the physical or mental health or condition of a data subject, his political opinions, his religious beliefs or other beliefs of a similar nature, the commission or alleged commission by him of any offence

or any other personal data as the Minister of Information, Communications and Culture

(“Minister”) may determine by order published in the Gazette.

National Data Protection Authority

Currently, there is no centralized data protection authority in Malaysia.

Pursuant to the PDPA, a Personal Data Protection Commissioner (“Commissioner”) will be appointed to implement the PDPA’s provisions. The Commissioner will be advised by a Personal Data Protection Advisory Committee. Decisions of the Commissioner can be appealed against through the Personal Data Protection Appeal Tribunal.

Registration

Currently, there is no centralized data protection authority in Malaysia.

When the PDPA comes into operation, the Minister may specify a class of data users who shall be required to be registered as data users.

Data Protection officers

Currently, there is no requirement for data users to appoint a data protection officer in Malaysia. There is also no such requirement under the PDPA.

Collection and Processing

Currently, there are no specific legislative requirements for the collection and processing of personal data in Malaysia.

Under the PDPA, subject to certain exceptions, data users are generally required to obtain the consent of data subjects for the processing (which includes collection and disclosure) of their personal data. There are also other obligations imposed on the data user in relation to the processing of personal data, including, for example, requirements to notify the data subjects regarding the purpose for which their personal data are collected.

Transfer

Currently, there are no specific legislative requirements for the transfer of personal data in Malaysia.

Under the PDPA, a data user may not transfer personal data to jurisdictions outside of Malaysia

unless that jurisdiction has been specified by the Minister.

However, there are exceptions to this restriction, such as where:

  • the data subject has given his consent to the transfer;
  • the transfer is necessary for the performance of a contract between the data subject and the data user;
  • the data user has taken all reasonable steps and exercised all due diligence to ensure that the personal data will not be processed in a manner which, if that place were Malaysia, would contravene the PDPA; and
  • the transfer is necessary to protect the data subject’s vital interests.

Security

Currently, there are no specific legislative requirements for the imposition of security measures for the protection of personal data in Malaysia.

Under the PDPA, data users have an obligation to take “practical” steps to protect personal data.

Breach notification

Currently, there are no specific legislative requirements for data users to notify authorities regarding data protection breaches in Malaysia.

The PDPA is also silent on this issue.

Enforcement

Currently, there are no specific legislative provisions for the enforcement of personal data protection in Malaysia.

Under the PDPA, the Commissioner is empowered to implement and enforce the personal data protection laws and to monitor and supervise compliance with the provisions of the PDPA.

Violation of the PDPA attracts criminal liability. The prescribed penalties include the imposition of fines or a term of imprisonment or both. Directors, CEOs, managers or other similar officers will have joint and several liability for non-compliance by the body corporate, subject to a due diligence defense.

However, there is no express right under the PDPA allowing aggrieved data subjects to pursue a

civil claim against data users for breaches of the PDPA.

Electronic Marketing

The PDPA applies to electronic marketing activities that involve the processing of personal

data for the purposes of commercial transactions. There are no specific provisions in the PDPA

that deal with electronic marketing. However, the PDPA provides that a data subject may, at any time by notice in writing to a data user, require the data user at the end of such period as is reasonable in the circumstances to cease or not to begin processing his personal data for

purposes of direct marketing. “Direct marketing” means the communication by whatever means of any advertising or marketing material which is directed to particular individuals.

Line Privacy (Including Cookies and Location Data)

There are no provisions in the PDPA that specifically address the issue of online privacy (including cookies and location data). However, when the PDPA comes into force, any electronic processing of personal data in Malaysia will be subject to the PDPA and the Commissioner may issue further guidance on this issue.

West Malaysia-16th November, 1961;

Sabah-3rd February, 1966;

Sarawak-7th March, 1968]

PART I

PRELIMINARY

1. Short title.

This Act may be cited as the Prevention of Corruption Act, 196 1.

2. Interpretation.

In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires-

“agent” means any person employed by or acting for another, and includes a trustee, administrator and executor, and a person serving under any public body, and for the purposes of section 14 includes a sub-contractor and any person employed by or acting for such sub-contractor;

“Gratification” includes-

(a) Money or any gift, loan, fee, reward, valuable security or other property or interest in property of any description, whether movable or immovable;

(b) Any office, dignity, employment, contract or services, and any agreement to give employment or render services in any capacity;

(c) Any payment, release, discharge or liquidation of any loan, obligation or other liability whatsoever, whether in whole or in part;

(d) Any valuable consideration of any kind, any discount, commission, rebate, bonus, deduction or percentage;

(e) Any forbearance to demand any money or money’s worth or valuable thing;

(f) any aid, vote, consent or influence, or pretended aid, vote, consent or influence, and any promise or procurement of, or agreement or Endeavour to procure, or the holding out of any expectation of, any gift, loan, fee, reward, consideration or gratification within the meaning of this paragraph;

(g) any other service, favor or advantage of any description whatsoever, including protection from any penalty or disability incurred or apprehended or from any action or proceedings of a disciplinary or penal nature, whether or not already instituted, and including the exercise or the forbearance from the exercise of any right or any official power or duty; and

(h) Any offer, undertaking or promise of any gratification within the meaning of paragraphs (a) to (g);

“Offence under this Act” means an offence punishable under section 3, 4, 5, 7, 8 or 9 and includes-

(a) An attempt to commit any such offence;

(b) An abetment of or a criminal conspiracy to commit (as those terms are defined in the Penal Code) any such offence, whether or not the offence is committed in consequence thereof;

“prescribed offence” means an offence punishable under section 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 213, 214 or 215 of the Penal Code or section 137 of the Customs Act, 1967, and includes –

(a) An attempt to commit any such offence;

(b) An abetment of or a criminal conspiracy to commit (as those terms are defined in the Penal Code) any such offence, whether or not the offence is committed in consequence thereof;

“principal” includes any employer, any beneficiary under a trust, and any trust estate (as though it were a person), any person beneficially interested in the estate of a deceased person, the estate of a deceased person (as though it were a person) and, in the case of any person serving under a public body, the public body;

“Public body” includes-

(a) The Government of Malaysia;

(b) The Government of a State;

(c) Any department, service or undertaking of the Government of Malaysia or a State;

(d) any corporation, council, board, commissioners or other body which has power to act under and for the purpose of any written law in force in Malaysia or any part thereof relating to local government, public health or undertakings of public utility, or otherwise has power to administer funds belonging to any Government in Malaysia, or money raised by rates, taxes or charges in pursuance of any written law in force in Malaysia or any part thereof;

“Public officer” includes any person in the permanent or temporary employment of a public body.

PART II

OFFENCES AND PENALTIES

3. Punishment of corruption.

Any person who shall by himself or by or in conjunction with any other person-

(a) Corruptly solicit or receive or agree to receive for himself or for any other person; or

(b) Corruptly give, promise or offer to any person whether for the benefit of that person or of another person,

Any gratification as an inducement to or reward for, or otherwise on account of-

(I) any person doing or forbearing to do anything in respect of any matter or transaction whatsoever, actual or proposed or likely to take place;

(ii) any member, officer, or servant of a public body doing or forbearing to do anything in respect of any matter or transaction whatsoever, actual or proposed or likely to take place, in which the public body is concerned,

Shall be guilty of an offence and shall, on conviction, be liable to a fine not exceeding ten thousand ringed or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years or to both.

4. Punishment of corrupt transactions with agents.

If-

(a) any agent corruptly accepts or obtains, or -agrees to accept or attempts to obtain, from any person, for himself or for any other person, any gratification as an inducement or reward for doing or forbearing to do, or for having after the coming into operation of this Act done or forborne to do, any act in relation to his principal’s affairs or business, or for showing or forbearing to show favor or disfavor to any person in relation to his principal’s affairs or business;

(b) any person corruptly gives or agrees to give or offers any gratification to any agent as an inducement or reward for doing or forbearing to do, or for having after the coming into operation of this Act done or forborne to do any act in relation to his principal’s affairs or business, or for showing or forbearing to show favor or disfavor to any person in relation to his principal’s affairs or business; or

(c) any person knowingly gives to an agent, or if an agent knowingly uses with intent to deceive his principal, any receipt, account or other document in respect of which the principal is interested, and which contains any statement which is false or erroneous or defective in any material particular, and which to his knowledge is intended to mislead the principal,

He shall be guilty of an offence and shall, on conviction, be liable to a fine not exceeding ten thousand ringed or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years or to both.

5. Increase of maximum penalty in certain cases.

A person convicted of an offence under section 3 or 4 shall, where the matter or transaction in relation. to which the offence was committed was a contract or a proposal for a contract with any public body, or a sub-contract to execute any work comprised in such a contract, be liable to a fine not exceeding ten thousand ringed or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding seven years or to both.

6. Acceptor of gratification to be guilty notwithstanding that purpose not carried out, etc.

(1) Where in any proceedings against any agent for any offence under section 4 (a) it is proved that he corruptly accepted, obtained or agreed to accept or attempted to obtain any gratification having reason to believe or suspect that the gratification was offered as an inducement or reward for his doing or forbearing to do any act or for showing or forbearing to show any favor or disfavor to any person in relation to his principal’s affairs or business he shall be guilty of an offence under that section notwithstanding that he did not have the power, right or opportunity so to do, show or forbear or that he accepted the gratification without intending so to do, show or forbear or that he did not in fact so do, show or forbear or that the act, favor or disfavor was not in relation to his principal’s affairs or business.

(2) Where in any proceedings against any person for any offence under section 4 (b) it is proved that he corruptly gave, agreed to give or offered any gratification to any agent as an inducement or reward for doing or forbearing to do any act or for showing or forbearing to show any favor or disfavor to any person having, reason to believe or suspect that the agent had the power, right or opportunity so to do, show or forbear and that the act, favor or disfavor was in relation to his principal’s affairs or business he shall be guilty, of an offence under that section notwithstanding that the agent had no power, right or opportunity or that the act, favor or disfavor was not in relation to his principal’s affairs or business.

7. Corruptly procuring withdrawal of tenders.

A person-

(a) who, with intent to obtain from any public body a contract for performing any work, providing any service, doing anything, or supplying any article, material or substance, offers any gratification to any person who has made a tender for the contract, as an inducement or a reward for his withdrawing the tender; or

(b) Who solicits or accepts any gratification as an inducement or a reward for his withdrawing a tender made by him for such contract,

Shall be guilty of an offence and shall, on conviction, be liable to a fine not exceeding ten thousand ringed or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding seven years or to both.

8. Bribery of member of legislature.

Any person who offers to a member of Parliament or a State Legislative Assembly, or, being a member thereof solicits or accepts, any gratification as an inducement or reward for his doing or forbearing to do any act or for showing or forbearing to show any favor or disfavor in his capacity as member, shall, notwithstanding that the member did not have the power, right or opportunity so to do, show or forbear, or that he did not in fact so do, show or forbear, or that the inducement or reward was not in relation to the affairs of Parliament or a State Legislative Assembly, as the case may be, be guilty of an offence and shall, on conviction, be liable to a fine not exceeding ten thousand ringed or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding seven years or to both.

9. Bribery of member of public body.

Any person who offers to a member of any public body, or, being a member of any public body solicits or accepts any gratification as an inducement or reward for-

(a) The member voting or abstaining from voting at any meeting of the public body in favor of or against any measure, resolution or question submitted to the public body;

(b) the member performing, or abstaining from performing, or aiding in procuring, expediting, delaying, hindering or preventing the performance of, any official act;

(c) The member aiding in procuring or preventing the passing of any vote or the granting of any contract or advantage in favor of any person; or

(d) The member showing or forbearing to show any favor or disfavor in his capacity as a member,

shall, notwithstanding that the member did not have the power, right or opportunity so to do, show or forbear, or that the inducement or reward was not in relation to the affairs of the public body, be guilty of an offence and shall. On conviction, be liable to a fine not exceeding ten thousand ringed or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding seven years or to both.

10. Obstruction of search.

Any person who-

(A) Refuses any police officer acting in the execution of his duty under this Act access to any place;

(b) assaults, obstructs, hinders or delays him in effecting any entrance which he is entitled to effect under this Act or in the execution of any duty imposed or power conferred by this Act;

(c) Fails to comply with any lawful demands of a police officer acting in the execution of his duty under this Act; or

(d) Refuses or neglects to give any information which may reasonably be required of him and which he has it in his power to give,

Shall be guilty of an offence and shall, on conviction, be liable to a fine not exceeding two thousand ringed or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year or to both.

11. Abetment of commission of offence outside Malaysia.

Whoever abets, within the meaning of the Penal Code, the commission outside Malaysia of any act in relation to the affairs or business or on behalf of a principal residing in Malaysia, which if committed in Malaysia would be an offence under this Act, shall, whether or not the act is committed in consequence of the abetment, be deemed to have committed that offence and be punishable accordingly.

12. Duty of public officer to whom a gratification is given or offered.

A member of Parliament, a member of a State Legislative Assembly, a member of a public body or a public officer to whom any gratification is corruptly given, promised or offered shall at the earliest possible opportunity thereafter report the gift, promise or offer, together with the name, if known, of the person who gives, promises or offers the gratification to him, to the nearest police officer; and if he fails to do so without reasonable excuse he shall be guilty of an offence and shall, on conviction, be liable to a fine not exceeding five hundred ringed or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months or to both.

13. When penalty to be imposed in addition to other punishment.

Where a court convicts any person of an offence committed by the acceptance of any gratification in contravention of any provision of this Act, then, if that gratification is a sum of money or if the value of that gratification can be assessed, the court shall, in addition to imposing on that person any other punishment, order him to pay as a penalty, within the time and to the body and in the manner specified in the order, a sum which is equal to the amount of that gratification or is, in the opinion of the court, the value of that gratification, and any such penalty shall be recoverable as a fine.

PART III

EVIDENCE

14. Presumption of corruption in certain cases.

Where in any proceedings against a person for an offence under section 3 or 4 it is proved that any gratification has been paid or given to or received by a person in the employment of any public body, the gratification shall be deemed to have been paid or given and received corruptly as an inducement or reward as hereinbefore mentioned, unless the contrary is proved.

15. Admissibility of statements to police officers.

(1) In any trial or inquiry by a court into an offence under this Act or into a prescribed offence any statement by an accused person, whether the statement amounts to a confession or not or is oral or in writing, made at any time, whether before or after the person is charged and whether in the course of a police investigation or not and whether or not wholly or partly in answer to questions, by the person to or in the hearing of any police officer, whether or not interpreted to him by any other police officer or any other person concerned, or not, in the arrest, shall, notwithstanding anything to the contrary contained in any written law, be admissible at his trial in evidence and, if the person tenders himself as a witness, any such statement may be used in cross-examination and for the purpose of impeaching his credit:

Provided that no such statement shall be admissible or used as aforesaid-

(a) if the making of the statement appears to the court to have been caused by any inducement, threat or promise having reference to the charge against that person, proceeding from a person in authority and sufficient in the opinion of the court to give that person grounds which would appear to him reasonable for supposing that by making it he would gain any advantage or avoid any evil of a temporal nature in reference to the proceeding against him; or

(b) in the case of a statement made by that person after his arrest, unless the court is satisfied that, before making the statement, a caution was administered to him in the following words or words to the like effect: “It is my duty to warn you that you are not obliged to say anything or to answer any question, but anything you say, whether in answer to a question or not, may be given in evidence”.

(2) Notwithstanding anything to the contrary contained in any written law a person accused of any offence referred to in subsection (1) shall not be bound to answer any questions relating to the offence after any such caution as aforesaid has been administered to him.

16. Evidence of custom inadmissible.

In any civil or criminal proceeding under this Act evidence shall not be admissible to show that any such gratification as is mentioned in this Act is customary in any profession, trade, and vocation or calling.

17. Evidence of pecuniary resources or property.

(1) In any trial or inquiry by a court into an offence under this Act or into a prescribed offence the fact that an accused person is in possession, for which he cannot satisfactorily account, of pecuniary resources or property disproportionate to his known sources of income, or that he had, at or about the time of the alleged offence, obtained an accretion to his pecuniary resources or property for which he cannot satisfactorily account, may be proved and may be taken into consideration by – the court as corroborating the testimony of any witness in the trial or inquiry that the accused person accepted or obtained or agreed to accept or attempted to obtain any gratification and as showing that the gratification was accepted or obtained or agreed to be accepted or attempted to be obtained corruptly as an inducement or reward.

(2) An accused person shall, for the purposes of subsection (1), be deemed to be in possession of resources or property or to have obtained an accretion thereto where the resources or property are held or the accretion is obtained by any other person who, having regard to his relationship to the accused person or to any other circumstances, there is reason to believe is holding the resources or property or has obtained the accretion in trust for or on behalf of or, as a gift from, the accused person.

18. Evidence of accomplice.

Notwithstanding any rule of law or written law to the contrary, no witness shall, in any such trial or inquiry as is referred to in section 17, be presumed to be unworthy of credit by reason only of any payment or delivery by him or on his behalf of any gratification to an agent or member of a public body.

19. Examination of offenders.

(1) Whenever two or more persons are charged with an offence under this Act or with any prescribed offence the court may require one or more of them to give evidence as a witness or witnesses for the prosecution.

(2) Any person referred to in subsection (1) who refuses to be sworn or to answer any lawful question shall be dealt with in the same manner as witnesses so refusing may by law be dealt with by a Magistrate’s Court or Sessions Court, as the case may be.

(3) Every person required to give evidence under subsection (1), who in the opinion of the court makes true and full discovery of all things as to which he is lawfully examined, shall be entitled to receive a certificate of indemnity under the hand of the Magistrate or Sessions Court Judge as the case may be, stating that he has made a true and full discovery of all things as to which he was examined, and such certificate shall be a bar to all legal proceedings against him in respect of all such things as aforesaid.

20. Protection of informers.

(1) Except as hereinafter provided, no complaint as to an offence under this Act or any prescribed offence shall be admitted in evidence in any civil or criminal proceeding whatsoever, and no witness shall be obliged or permitted to disclose the name or address of any informer, or state any matter which might lead to his discovery.

(2) If any books, documents or papers which are in evidence or liable to inspection in any civil or criminal proceeding whatsoever contain any entry in which any informer is named or described or which might lead to his discovery, the court before which the proceeding is had shall cause all such passages to be concealed from view or to be obliterated so far as is necessary to protect the informer from discovery, but no further.

(3) If in any proceeding relating to an offence under this Act or a prescribed offence the court, after full inquiry into the case, is of opinion that the informer willfully made in his complaint a material statement which he knew or believed to be false or did not believe to be true, or is of opinion that justice cannot be fully done between the parties thereto without the discovery of the informer, the court may require the production of the original complaint, if in writing, and permit inquiry and require full disclosure concerning the informer.

PART IV

POWERS OF POLICE

21. Powers of search and seizure.

(1) Whenever it appears to any Magistrate upon information and after such inquiry as he thinks necessary that there is reasonable cause to believe that in any place there is any evidence of the commission of an offence under this Act, or of any prescribed offence, he may, by warrant directed to any police officer empower the officer to enter the place, by force if necessary, and there to search for, seize and detain any such evidence.

(2) Whenever it appears to any police officer of or above the rank of Inspector that there is reasonable cause to believe that in any place there is concealed or deposited any evidence of the commission of an offence under this Act, or of any prescribed offence, and the police officer has reasonable grounds for believing that by reason of the delay in obtaining a search warrant the object of the search is likely to be frustrated, he may exercise in and in respect of the place all the powers mentioned in subsection (1) in as full and ample a measure as if he were empowered to do so by warrant issued under the subsection.

22. Legal obligation to give information.

Every person required by a police officer to give any information on any subject which it is the police officer’s duty to inquire into under this Act or any prescribed offence and which it is in his power to give, shall be legally bound to give the information.

PART V

PROVISIONS RELATING TO THE PUBLIC PROSECUTOR

23. Special powers of investigation.

(1) Notwithstanding anything in any other law contained, the Public Prosecutor, if satisfied that there are reasonable grounds for suspecting that an offence under this Act, or any prescribed offence, has been committed by any person, May by order authorize any police officer of or above the rank. Of Assistant Superintendent named in the order to make an investigation in the matter in such manner or mode as may be specified in the order. The order may authorize the investigation of any bank account, share account or purchase account, expense account or any other. Account or any safe deposit box in any bank, and shall be sufficient authority for the disclosure or production by any person of all or any information or accounts or documents or articles as may be required by the officer so authorized.

(2) Any person who fails or refuses to disclose any such information or to produce any such accounts or documents or articles to the person so authorized shall be guilty of an offence and shall, on conviction, be liable to a fine not exceeding two thousand ringed or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year or to both.

24. Public Prosecutor’s powers to order inspection of bankers’ books.

(1) The Public Prosecutor may, if he considers that any evidence of the commission of an offence under this Act, or any prescribed offence, by a person in the service of a public body is likely to be found in any banker’s book relating to that person, his wife or child, or to a person reasonably believed by the Public Prosecutor to be an agent or trustee for that person, by order authorize any police officer of or above the rank of Assistant Superintendent named in the order to inspect any such book and the police officer so authorized may, at all reasonable times, enter the bank specified in the order and inspect the books kept therein and may take copies of any relevant entry in any such book.

(2) For the purpose of this section-

“bank” means any bank licensed under the Banking Act, 1973, and includes the Post Office Savings Bank established under any written law relating to Post Office Savings Banks, and any co-operative society registered under any written law relating to co-operative societies;

“Banker’s books” includes ledgers, day books, cash books, account books and all other books and documents used in the ordinary course of the ‘lousiness of a bank.

25. Public Prosecutor’s powers to obtain information.

(1) In the course of any investigation or proceedings into or relating to an offence under this Act, or any prescribed offence, by any person, the Public Prosecutor may, notwithstanding anything in any other written law to the contrary, by written notice-

(a) require any such person to furnish a sworn statement in writing enumerating all movable or immovable property belonging to or possessed be the person, his agent or trustee, and by the spouse, sons and daughters of the person, and specifying the date on which each of the properties enumerated was acquired whether by way of purchase, gift, bequest, inheritance or otherwise;

(b) Require any such person to furnish a sworn statement in writing of any money or other property sent out of Malaysia by him during the period specified in the notice;

(c) require any other person to furnish a sworn statement in writing enumerating all movable or immovable property belonging to or possessed by the person where the Public Prosecutor has reasonable grounds to believe that the information can assist the investigation;

(d) require the person in charge of any public body to produce or furnish, as specified in the notice, any document or a certified copy of any document which is in his possession or under his control;

(e) Require the manager of any bank to give copies of the accounts of the person or of the spouse or a son or daughter of the person at the bank.

(2) Every person to whom a notice is sent by the Public Prosecutor under subsection (1) shall, notwithstanding the provisions of an written law or any oath of secrecy to the contrary, comply with the terms of the notice within such time as may be specified therein; and any person who willfully neglects or fails so to comply shall be guilty of an offence and shall, on conviction, be liable to a fine not exceeding two thousand ringed or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year or to both.

26. Prosecution of offences.

(1) A prosecution under this Act shall not be instituted except by or with the consent of the Public Prosecutor:

Provided that a person charged with such an offence may be arrested, or a warrant for his arrest may be issued and executed, and any person so arrested may be remanded in custody or on bail, notwithstanding that the consent of the Public Prosecutor to the institution of a prosecution for the offence has not been obtained, but the case shall not be further prosecuted until that consent has been obtained.

(2) When a person is brought before a court under this section before the Public Prosecutor has consented to the prosecution the charge shall be explained to him but he shall not be called upon to plead, and the provisions of the law for the time being in force relating to criminal procedure shall be modified accordingly.

PART VI

MISCELLANEOUS

27. Liability of citizen’s f or of fences outside Malaysia.

The provisions of this Act shall, in relation to citizens, have effect outside as well as within Malaysia; and where an offence under this Act, or any prescribed offence, is committed by any citizen in any place outside Malaysia he may be dealt with in respect of that offence as if it had been committed at any place within Malaysia at which he may be found or to which he may have been brought in consequence of any proceedings for his extradition to Malaysia from any place outside Malaysia:

Provided that any proceedings against any person under this section which would be a bar to subsequent proceedings against the person for the same offence if the offence had been committed in Malaysia shall be a bar to further proceedings against him under the Extradition Ordinance, 1958, in respect of the same offence outside Malaysia.

28. Trial of offences.

Notwithstanding the provisions of any written law to the contrary, a Sessions Court or, in Saba and Sarawak, the Court of a Magistrate of the First Class, shall have jurisdiction to try any offence under this Act, or any prescribed offence, and to award the full punishment for the offence.

29. Offences to be sizable.

Every offence under this Act and every prescribed offence shall be deemed to be a sizable offence for the purposes of the law for the time being in force relating to criminal procedure.

30. Principal may recover amount of secret gift.

(1) Where any gratification has in contravention of this Act been given by any person to an agent, the principal may recover as a civil debt the amount or the money value thereof either from the agent or from the person who gave the gratification to the agent, and no conviction or acquittal of the defendant in respect of an offence under this Act shall operate as a bar to proceedings for the recovery of such amount or money value.

(2) Nothing in this section shall be deemed to prejudice or affect any right which any principal may have under any written law or rule of law to recover from his agent any money or property.

ARRANGEMENT OF SECTIONS

PART I

PRELIMINARY

Seksyen

1. Short Title and Commencement

2. Interpretation

PART II

ESTABLISHMENT OF AGENCY, APPOINTMENTS AND POWERS.

3. Establishment of the Anti-Corruption Agency and Appointment of the Director-General of the Agency.

4. Appointment of Other Officers of the Agency.

5. Production of Authority Card.

6. Officer Deemed To Be Always On Duty.

7. Powers of Officers of the Agency.

8. Duties of Officers of the Agency.

9. Standing Orders.

PART III

OFFENCES AND PENALTIES

10. Offence of accepting gratification.

11. Offence in giving or accepting gratification by agent.

12. Acceptor or giver of gratification to be guilty notwithstanding that purpose was not carried out or matter not in relation to principal’s affairs or business.

13. Corruptly procuring withdrawal of tender.

14. Bribery of officer of Public Body.

15. Offence of Using Office or Position for Gratification.

16. Penalty for offences under sections 10, 11, 13, 14, and

17. Duty to report bribery transaction.

18. Dealing with, using, holding, receiving or concealing Gratification or advantage in relation to any offence.

19. Making of statement which is false or intended to Mislead, etc., to an officer of the Agency or the Public Prosecutor.

20. Attempts, preparations, abetments and criminal Conspiracies punishable as offence.

PART IV

INVESTIGATION, SEARCH,

SEIZURE AND ARREST

21. Power to investigate reports and enquire into information.

22. Power to examine persons.

23. Power of search and seizure.

24. Translation.

25. Seizure of movable property.

26. Further provisions relating to seizure of movable Property.

27. Advocates and solicitors may be required to disclose Information.

28. Legal obligation to give information.

29. Obstruction of inspection and search.

30. Offences under Act to be sizable offences and powers of officers of the Agency relating to investigations.

PART V

PROVISIONS RELATING TO

PUBLIC PROSECUTOR

31. Investigation of share, purchase account, etc.

32. Public Prosecutor’s powers to obtain information.

33. Seizure of movable property in bank.

34. Seizure of immovable property.

35. Prohibition of dealing with property outside Malaysia.

36. Forfeiture of property upon prosecution for an offence.

37. Forfeiture of property where there is no prosecution for an offence.

38. Dealing with property after seizure to be void.

39. Power to intercept communications.

40. Surrender of travel documents.

41. Public Prosecutor’s powers to amend or revoke any Order or notice under this Act.

PART VI

EVIDENCE

42. Presumption in certain offences.

43. Evidence of corroboration.

44. Evidence of accomplice and agent provocateur.

45. Admissibility of statements by accused persons.

46. Admissibility of statements and documents of persons who are dead or cannot be traced, etc.

47. Certificate of position or office held.

48. Admissibility of translation of documents.

49. Evidence of custom inadmissible.

PART VII

PROSECUTION AND TRIAL OF OFFENCE

50. Prosecution of offences.

51. Joiner of offences.

52. Examination of offenders.

53. Protection of informers and information.

PART VIII

GENERAL

54. Protection of offences.

55. Liability for offences outside Malaysia.

56. Application of provisions of this Act to a prescribed Offence.

57. General Offence.

58. General Penalty.

59. Power of Police Officers under this Act.

60. Minister’s power to make orders and rules.

61. Repeal.

62. Transitional.

An Act to establish the Anti-Corruption Agency,
to vest powers on officers of the Agency and to
make provisions connected therewith.

Enacted by the Duly Yang Mahan Mullica Seri Padua Agenda Yang di-Pertuan aging with the advice and consent of the Dean Negara and Dean Racist in Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:

1. This Act may be cited as the Anti-Corruption Agency Act 1982.

2. In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires–

“Agency” means the Anti-Corruption Agency established by this Act;

“Officer of the Agency” means the Director-General of the Agency appointed under section 3 (2) and any officer appointed under section 4;

“Prescribed law” means any written law prescribed by the Minister by order published in the Gazette with respect to which the provisions of this Act shall apply.

3. (1) For the purposes of this Act, the Prevention of Corruption Act 1961 and any prescribed law there is hereby established the Anti-Corruption Agency.

(2) The Director-General of the Agency shall be appointed by the Yang di-Pertuan aging on the advice of the Prime Minister and shall hold office for such period as may be specified in the instrument of appointment.

4. (1) there shall be appointed so many officers of the Agency and of such classes or grades, as may be considered necessary for the purpose of carrying into effect the provisions of this Act.

(2) All officers of the Agency are members of the general public service of the Federation.

5. (1) The Director-General of the Agency shall have all the powers of a Deputy Public Prosecutor under the Criminal Procedure Code and all the powers of an officer of the Agency.

(2) For the purposes of this Act, the Prevention of Corruption Act 1961, and any prescribed law, an officer of the Agency shall be deemed to be a police officer and shall have all the powers and immunities of such officer appointed under the Police Act 1967, and the Criminal Procedure Code and any other written law shall be construed accordingly.

(3) An officer of the Agency shall, subject to section 6, have all the powers of an officer of customs under any prescribed law as if he was an officer appointed under the Customs Act 1967, and the Criminal Procedure Code shall be construed accordingly.

6. (1) The Minister may from time to time by order published in the Gazette prescribe any written law with respect to which the provisions of this Act shall apply.

(2) In any order made under subsection (1) or in any subsequent order, the Minister may specify that an officer of the Agency of a class or grade shall be regarded for the purpose of the law to be equivalent to an officer of a class or grade under the prescribed law.

7. (1) Every officer of the Agency when acting under the Prevention of Corruption Act 1961 or any prescribed law shall on demand declare his office and produce to the person against whom he is acting or from whom he seeks any information such authority card as the Director-General of the Agency may direct to be carried by such officer.

(2) It shall not be an offence for any person to refuse to comply with any request, demand or order made by an officer of the Agency acting or purporting to act under any law as aforesaid if such officer refuses to declare his office and produce his authority card on demand being made by such person.

8. The Director-General of the Agency may issue administrative orders to be called “Standing Orders”, not inconsistent with the provisions of this Act, for the general control, training, duties and responsibilities of the officers of the Agency and for such other matters, as may be necessary or expedient for the good administration of the Agency or for the prevention of the abuse of powers or neglect of duty and generally for ensuring the efficient and effective functioning of the Agency.

9. Every officer of the Agency shall, for the purposes of this Act, be deemed to be always on duty when required to act as such and shall perform the duties and exercise the powers granted to him under this Act or any other law at any place in the Federation where he may be performing duty.

10. (1) where any reference is made in any written law or otherwise to the Biro Siesta Negara or in English, the National Bureau of Investigation, and such reference shall from the commencement of this Act be construed as a reference to the Baden Panacea Rasa or, in English, the Anti-Corruption Agency respectively.

(2) Any act done or any action taken prior to the commencement of this Act by an officer of the Biro Siesta Negara shall be deemed to have been done or taken, by an officer of the Anti-Corruption Agency and may accordingly be continued by an officer of the Anti-Corruption Agency.

(3) Any order made under section 6 of the Biro Siesta Negara Act 1973 and in force immediately before the commencement of this Act shall, upon the coming into force of this Act, continue to remain in full force and effect and may be repealed or amended in accordance with this Act.

(4) It is hereby declared that the person holding the office of Director-General of the Biro Siesta Negara and all other officers holding office in the said Bureau immediately before the commencement of this Act shall, upon the coming into force of this Act, become the Director-General and officers of the Agency, respectively.

11. The Biro Siesta Negara Act 1973 is repealed.

Police Background Check Procedures

Who can apply?

• Citizens and residents (12 months residency minimum) may apply.
• Applicants only; employers or third party representatives may not apply.

Where?

• Local applicants must apply through the Consular Division of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Malaysia.
• Overseas applicants must apply through the Malaysian High Commissio
n in London (address supplied below).

What must the applicant supply?

Local and overseas applicants must supply:
• Complete 3 copies of application form
• Two passport sized photographs
• Identity card number
• Passport details
• Personal details
• Purpose of application
• Two photocopies of applicant’s passport including the details of bearer, front and back pages for Malaysian citizen and all visa stamp pages for Non-Malaysian
• Two copies of applicant’s ID card (Malaysians only)
• Introduction letter from employer (foreigners only and of prospective employer(s) stating requirement of certificate)
• Self-addressed envelope with £2.00 postage (if unable to collect certificate)
• Statutory statement claiming that the applicant does not have any criminal in
formation to disclose*.
*It must be noted that certificates are issued immediately upon receiving the statutory letter and are not checked against the criminal record database up to 30 days. Where employers will be notified of any corrections after 30 day
s, employers may alternatively encourage applicants to apply to the Central
Criminal Registry (CCR) office in Kuala Lumpur for an official letter confirming the applicant does not have a criminal record.

What are the costs / turnaround times?

• Fee of 20 MYR (approx. £4.15) in cash or by postal order made out to
“Akauntan Negara”, Malaysia (“State Accountant”)
• Commission fee of £4.
• Turnaround time given upon application.

Contact Details

Application forms for foreigners and Malaysians:
http://www.kln.gov.my/web/guest/home/ (English–under e-consular)
Malaysian High Commission, London and details of High Commission application process:
Consular Division
The High Commission of Malaysia
45 & 46 Belgrave Square
London
SW1X 8QT
Tel: 020 7235 8033
Fax: (+44) 207 235 5161
Email: myconsular@btconnect.com
Website: http://www.kln.gov.my/web/guest/home/
Applicants in Malaysia should apply to:
Consular Division
Ministry of Foreign Affairs Malaysia
Wisma Putra
No. 1 Jalan Wisma Putra
Precinct 2
62602 Putrajaya Selangor
Tel: (+603)-888-740-00
The contact details for the CCR in Malaysia are:
Central Criminal Registry, Bukit Aman.
4thFloor (D2), Royal Malaysian Police Headquarters
PO Box 10248,
50560 Kuala Lumpar,
Malaysia
Tel: (+603) 2262 6222

Malaysia – Know Your Customer (KYC) Rules

Malaysia is a growing regional financial center and has a well-developed anti-money laundering/counter-terrorist financing (AML/CFT) framework. Malaysia‘s long porous land and sea borders and its strategic geographic position increase its vulnerability to transnational criminal activity, including money laundering and terrorist financing. Malaysia is primarily used as a transit country to transfer drugs originating from the Golden Triangle and Europe; and Iranian and Nigerian drug trafficking organizations are the main sources of illegal proceeds in Malaysia. Drug trafficking is the main source of illegal proceeds in Malaysia.

Malaysian authorities also highlight illegal proceeds from corruption as a significant money laundering risk. Other common predicate offenses generating significant proceeds in Malaysia include fraud, criminal breach of trust, illegal gambling, credit card fraud, counterfeiting, robbery, forgery, human trafficking, extortion and smuggling. Smuggling of goods subject to high tariffs is a major source of illicit funds. Customs‘ efforts to investigate invoice manipulation identified risks from trade based money laundering.

Free trade zones in Malaysia are divided into Free Industrial Zones (FIZ), where manufacturing and assembly takes place, and Free Commercial Zones (FCZ), generally for warehousing commercial stock. The FIZs are designed mainly to promote manufacturing industries producing goods mainly for export and are dominated by large international manufacturers attracted to the zones because they offer preferential tax and tariff treatment. Currently there are 17 FIZs and 17 FCZs in Malaysia. Companies wishing to operate in a FIZ or FCZ must be licensed.

Malaysia‘s offshore financial center on the island of Labuan is subject to the same AML/CFT laws as those governing onshore financial service providers. The financial institutions operating in Labuan are generally among the largest international banks and insurers. Offshore companies must be established through a trust company, which is required by law to establish true beneficial owners and submit suspicious transaction reports (STRs).

A number of terrorist organizations have been active on Malaysian territory, and authorities have taken action against Jemaah Islamiah and other terrorist networks. Terrorist financing in Malaysia is predominantly carried out using cash and relies on trusted, clandestine networks.

KNOW-YOUR-CUSTOMER (KYC) RULES:

Enhanced due diligence procedures for PEPs:

PEP is an abbreviation for Politically Exposed Person, a term that describes a person who has been entrusted with a prominent public function, or an individual who is closely related to such a person. The terms PEP, Politically Exposed Person and Senior Foreign Political Figure are often used interchangeably

    • Foreign PEP: YES
    • Domestic PEP: YES

Malaysia – KYC covered entities

The following is a list of Know Your Customer entities covered by Malaysian Law:

    • Banks in the conventional, Islamic, and offshore sectors
    • Offshore listing sponsors and trading agents
    • Stock and futures brokers
    • Unit trust, investment fund, and futures fund managers
    • Money lenders and pawnbrokers
    • Money remitters
    • Charge account and credit card issuers
    • Insurance financial advisers
    • e-money issuers
    • Leasing and factoring businesses
    • Lawyers, public notaries, accountants, and company secretaries
    • Licensed casinos and gaming outlets
    • Registered estate agents
    • Trust companies, and dealers in precious metals and stones

Malaysia – Suspicious Transaction Reporting (STR) Requirements:

Number of STRs received and time frame: 16,643 in 2010

Number of CTRs received and time frame: Not available

The following is a list of STR covered entities covered by Malaysian Law:

    • Banks in the conventional, Islamic, and offshore sectors
    • Offshore listing sponsors and trading agents
    • Stock and futures brokers
    • Wholesale money changers
    • Unit trust, investment fund, and futures fund managers
    • Money lenders and pawnbrokers
    • Money remitters
    • Charge account and credit card issuers
    • Insurance financial advisers
    • e-money issuers
    • Leasing and factoring businesses
    • Lawyers, public notaries, accountants, and company secretaries
    • Licensed casinos and gaming outlets
    • Registered estate agents
    • Trust companies, and dealers in precious metals and stones

MONEY LAUNDERING CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS/CONVICTIONS:

Prosecutions: 100 from 2004 to October, 2011
Convictions: 26 from 2004 to October, 2011

ENFORCEMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES AND COMMENTS:

Reporting institutions are subject to strict customer due diligence (CDD) rules, and the Government of Malaysia (GOM) has adopted banker negligence laws that extend criminal liability to bank directors if their institution launders money or finances terrorism.

The use of informal remittances, which are not subject to AML/CFT controls, creates vulnerability for abuse by money launderers and terrorist financiers. Malaysia‘s competent authority for implementing its AML/CFT laws, Bank Negara Malaysia, should continue its efforts to encourage the use of formal remittances. Additionally, law enforcement and customs authorities should examine trade based money laundering and invoice manipulation and their relationship to underground finance and informal remittance systems. Malaysia should more aggressively identify, investigate and prosecute drug trafficking kingpins.

In the past 12 months, Malaysia initiated eight new terror finance investigations under its AML/CFT legal framework. Malaysia should take further steps to increase capacity to identify, investigate, and prosecute terrorist and proliferation financing.

Malaysia‘s Labuan Financial Services Authority (LFSA) is responsible for ensuring AML/CFT compliance on Labuan, the country‘s international offshore financial center. The Labuan Financial Services and Securities Act of 2010 gives LFSA more regulatory, investigative and enforcement authorities over offshore financial services companies licensed in Labuan and removes privacy restrictions on its access to Labuan-based account activities. In 2011, the Inland Revenue Board launched a wide-ranging investigation into money laundering and smuggling activities in Labuan.

In February 2009, LFSA issued an operating license to First East Export Bank (FEEB), a wholly owned subsidiary of Iran-based Bank Mellat, which in 2007 was designated by the United States under Executive Order (E.O.) 13382 for its proliferation finance activities. FEEB opened its Labuan operation in August 2009. The United States designated FEEB under E.O. 13382 on November 5, 2009, based on its relationship to Bank Mellat. On June 9, 2010, UNSCR 1929 listed FEEB as an entity subject to UN sanctions. The GOM ordered FEEB‘s assets frozen and prohibited Malaysian banks from transacting business with FEEB on July 14, 2010, in full compliance with UNSCR 1929. LFSA should remain vigilant to any attempts to use Labuan for proliferation and terrorism finance activities.

Risk

Sovereign risk

The Economist Intelligence Unit expects the government to continue with its subsidy rationalisation programme in 2015-16. However, owing to increases in capital expenditure and a sharp drop in revenue from the energy sector, the budget deficit will widen in 2015. Public debt as a proportion of GDP will be just below the government’s self-imposed limit of 55%.

Banking sector risk

Volatility in the exchange rate of the ringgit and a drop in foreign-exchange reserves have resulted in a rating change for banking sector risk from A to BBB. Local banking groups enjoy high levels of liquidity and are well capitalised. As a result, they are well placed to absorb losses arising from economic shocks or problems affecting the international financial system.

Political risk

The ruling Barisan Nasional coalition will serve a full term in office. The leader of the opposition Pakatan Rakyat alliance, Anwar Ibrahim, has been imprisoned for five years after he lost an appeal against a court ruling that overturned a not-guilty verdict in a sodomy case against him. His detention has weakened the opposition, which will have difficulty replacing Mr Anwar.

Economic structure risk

Exports of goods and services will continue to account for a large proportion of GDP, highlighting Malaysia’s heavy dependence on external trade and its vulnerability to changes in global prices and demand.

Travel Risk

Security

The decision to travel is your responsibility. You are also responsible for your personal safety abroad. The purpose of this Travel Advice is to provide up-to-date information to enable you to make well-informed decisions.

Coastal areas of southeastern Sabah (see Advisory)

Clashes between Philippine gunmen and Malaysian authorities occurred from February to March 2013, resulting in several deaths. This area was declared a Special Security Area by the Malaysian government. Monitor local media and follow the advice of local authorities.

Despite increased security in the region, the risk of kidnapping and violence perpetrated by Philippine militants remains, especially on resort islands and surrounding waters, including around Sipadan. Violent incidents occur regularly. On July 12, 2014, gunmen opened fire at a dive resort on the island of Mabul, killing a police officer and kidnapping another. On April 2, 2014, a foreigner and a local employee were abducted from a resort on the island of Singamata. On November 15, 2013, a foreign couple was attacked in a resort on the island of Pom Pom; one was murdered and the other was abducted. Foreigners were also kidnapped in 2000 and 2003.

Crime

Violent crime against foreigners is uncommon. Petty crime is prevalent, especially in tourist areas and at the airport. Snatch-and-grab incidents against tourists occur. Thieves on motorcycles frequently grab bags and other valuables from pedestrians, often resulting in injury. Women walking alone or with children are common targets. Ensure that your personal belongings, passports and other travel documents are secure at all times. Do not leave valuables unattended in vehicles.

Be particularly cautious at bars or clubs. Never leave food or drinks unattended or in the care of strangers. Be wary of accepting snacks, beverages, gum or cigarettes from new acquaintances, as they may contain drugs that could put you at risk of sexual assault and robbery.

Terrorism

On September 21, 2014, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) released a statement threatening retaliation for the American-led coalition campaign against ISIL in Iraq and Syria. The statement encouraged opportunistic and indiscriminate attacks against citizens and interests of countries supporting the coalition, including Canadians. Individuals and terrorist groups in the region may be inspired to carry out attacks in a show of solidarity with ISIL. Canadians could also be targeted by a terrorist attack and be considered kidnapping targets. Exercise a high degree of personal security awareness, maintain a heightened level of vigilance and be aware of your surroundings at all times.

Airport taxis

Touts at Kuala Lumpur International Airport, including the Low Cost Carrier Terminal, attempt to get travellers to take their “taxi” into town. Several incidents of robbery and/or assault have occurred, as well as gross overcharges by such individuals. Take registered airport taxis only, after obtaining a coupon from the airport taxi stand near the door before exiting the customs and arrivals hall.

Demonstrations

Large-scale demonstrations have increased. Police permission is required for any public gathering or demonstration. Offenders could face lengthy jail sentences. Passersby have become victims of acts of violence during demonstrations. Avoid all political demonstrations and stay away from areas where they might occur. Protests can turn violent quickly and without warning. Demonstrations are usually accompanied by a heightened police presence and traffic delays.

Transportation

Traffic drives on the left. Road conditions are good. Aggressive driving habits by motorcyclists may pose a risk to foreign drivers who may not be accustomed to these competitive driving techniques.

Review the Travel Advice for Thailand if you are contemplating overland travel from Malaysia to Thailand.

See Transportation Safety in order to verify if national airlines meet safety standards.

Scams

A number of scam artists operate within Malaysia. Male travellers, usually alone, have been approached in public places with invitations to participate in card games offering attractive opportunities for winning large amounts of money. Victims have lost thousands of dollars before realizing they were being scammed.

There are reports of travellers encountering serious problems after responding to advertisements to do volunteer work with some adventure or environmental organizations. If you are interested in doing volunteer work abroad, conduct careful research before making a commitment.

Internet dating and financial scams are common. Foreigners, including Canadian expatriates, may be targeted. Consult our Overseas Fraud page for more information.

Credit card

fraud

Credit cards should be safeguarded at all times. Malaysia has one of the highest rates of credit card fraud in the world. Credit card magnetic strips have been duplicated, even in international hotels. Swiping your own card may not always be possible. Pay careful attention when others are handling your card during payment processing. Scams involving debit cards also occur. Before using your card, carefully inspect the automated banking machine to ensure that it has not been tampered with.

Piracy

Pirate attacks and armed robberies occur against ships in and around Malaysia, particularly in the Strait of Malacca and in the waters between Sabah and the southern Philippines. Mariners should take appropriate precautions. For additional information, consult the Live Piracy Report published by the International Maritime Bureau.

Address Format

RECIPIENT

[FLOOR] [,][BUILDING]
[STREET_NUMBER,] STREET_TYPE STREET_NAME [HOUSE_NUMBER]
[SECTION] [CITY_DISTRICT|VILLAGE]
POSTAL_CODE LOCALITY
[PROVINCE]
MALAYSIA

Sample

Saad Ananda
Level 3, Eastern Tower
Jalan Ampang 1
50450 KUALA LUMPUR
Wilayah Persekutuan
MALAYSIA

Summary

Calendar GMT Reference Actual Previous Consensus Forecast
2014-11-14 04:00 AM Q3 5.6% 6.5% (R) 5.6% 6.4%
2015-02-12 04:00 AM Q4 5.8% 5.6% 5.0% 4.91%
2015-05-15 05:00 AM Q1 5.6% 5.7% (R) 5.5% 5.37%
2015-08-13 04:00 AM Q2 5.6% 4.17%
2015-11-12 04:00 AM Q3 4.25%

 

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