IRELAND BACKGROUND CHECK

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General Information

GDP USD245.921bn (World ranking 44, World Bank 2014)
Population 4.61 million (World ranking 120, World Bank 2014)
Form of state Parliamentary Republic
Head of government Enda KENNY (Fine Gael)
Next elections 2016, legislative

 

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PRODUCTS IN IRELAND

Data Protection

Ireland

Contribution Details

Mason Hayes & Curran

Philip Nolan

Partner and Head of Commercial Department

Law

The core Irish data protection law is comprised in the Data Protection Act 1988 (“1988 Act”) as amended by the Data Protection (Amendment) Act 2003 (“2003 Act”) (together the Data Protection Acts (“DPA”)). The 2003 Act implemented the EU Data Protection Directive (95/46/EC). In addition to the DPA, the European Communities (Electronic Communications Networks and Services) (Privacy and Electronic Communications) Regulations 2011 (“ePrivacy Regulations”) set out data protection rules in relation to direct marketing and electronic networks and services, including location data and cookies.

Definition of Personal Data

Personal data is defined as data relating to a living individual who is or can be identified from the data or from the data in conjunction with other information that is in, or is likely to come into, the possession of the Data Controller.

Definition of Sensitive Personal Data

Sensitive personal data means personal data as to:

  • the racial or ethnic origin, the political opinions or the religious or philosophical beliefs of the data subject;
  • whether the data subject is a member of a trade union;
  • the physical or mental health or condition or sexual life of the data subject;
  • the commission or alleged commission of any offence by the data subject; or
  • any proceedings for an offence committed or alleged to have been committed by the data subject, the disposal of such proceedings or the sentence of any court in such proceedings.

National Data Protection Authority

office of the Data Protection Commissioner (“DPc”)

canal house Station road Portarlington Co. Laois ireland

Registration

All data controllers and data processors are required to register with the DPC unless exempt. The Irish registration regime contains wide exemptions for certain categories of processing that

do not trigger a registration obligation. There are also certain categories of data controller and

data processor that are subject to an absolute obligation to register.

The DPA exempts:

  • not for profit organizations, provided they only process personal data relating to their activities;
  • data controllers and data processors who process personal data kept in a public register; and
  • data controllers and data processors who only process manual data.
  • The Data Protection Act 1988 (Section 16(1)) Regulations 2007 (“2007 Regulations”) also exempt from registration:
  • data controllers that only process employees’ human resources data in the normal course of personnel administration;
  • candidates for political office and elected representatives;
  • schools, colleges, universities and similar educational institutions;
  • solicitors and barristers;
  • data controllers who process customer and supplier data in the context of normal commercial activity;
  • companies who process personal data of past and present shareholders, directors or other
  • officers in complying with the Irish Companies Acts;
  • data controllers who process personal data for the purpose of publishing journalistic, literary or artistic material; and
  • data controllers or data processors who operate under a statutory data protection code of practice.

Data processors that process personal data on behalf of any of the above categories of data controller are also not required to register.

The 2007 Regulations impose an absolute obligation to register on banks, insurance undertakings, direct marketing firms, debt collection agencies, credit reference agencies, health professionals, anyone processing genetic data, ISPs and telecoms companies. Any data processor that processes personal data on behalf of a data controller that falls into one of these categories is also obliged to register. A failure by a data controller or processor to register, when required to do so, is an offence punishable by fines up to EUR€100,000.

Data controllers and/or data processors are obliged to renew their registration annually. The DPC may refuse an application for registration under certain conditions. There is a right of appeal against a refusal to the Circuit Court.

Data Protection Officers

There is no legal requirement to appoint a data protection officer but it would be best practice

to do so. The DPC recommends that data controllers appoint a co-ordinator to deal with subject access requests. Where a data protection officer is appointed, this information should be supplied to the data subjects. A nominated contact for subject access requests also needs to be provided when making a registration application.

Collection and Processing

The DPA transposes the data protection principles from the Data Protection Directive, which need to be complied with in relation to the collection and processing of personal data.

In addition to complying with the data protection principles, all processing of personal data must comply with one of a number of legitimate processing conditions contained in the DPA.

These include that:

  • the data subject has given his or her consent to such processing;
  • the processing is required for the performance of a contract to which the data subject is a party;
  • the processing is to prevent an injury or other damage to the health of the data subject;
  • the processing is to protect an individual’s vital interests;
  • the processing is for the administration of justice; or
  • the processing is for the purposes of the legitimate interests pursued by a data controller.

If sensitive personal data is being processed, then an additional set of processing conditions need to be satisfied. These include the “explicit” consent of the data subject. The grounds for processing sensitive data are quite restrictive and it can sometimes be difficult to legitimise the processing of sensitive personal data.

Transfer

The DPA contains a number of restrictions on the transfer of personal data by a data controller to a country or territory outside of the European Economic Area (“EEA”). Under the DPA, such transfers may not take place unless the receiving country ensures an adequate level of protection for the privacy of data subjects in relation to the processing of their personal data.

A limited number of countries are recognised by the by the European Commission as having this level of protection.

Otherwise under the DPA, it is only possible to transfer personal data outside the EEA if:

  • the data subject has consented to the transfer;
  • the transfer is necessary for the performance of a contract between the data subject and the data controller;
  • the transfer is necessary for reasons of public interest;
  • the transfer is necessary under some international obligation of the State;
  • the transfer is required or authorized by law;
  • the transfer is necessary for obtaining legal advice;
  • the transfer is necessary in order to prevent personal injury or damage to the health of the data subject; or
  • the transfer is done under one of the EU Approved Model Clauses
  • Due to the varying standards of data protection in the US, transfers of data from the EEA to the US may take place (in the absence of fulfilling one of the exceptions above) where the recipient in the US has signed up to the Safe Harbour Scheme.

The DPC recognizes the use of binding corporate rules, and the Irish DPC has agreed to abide by the mutual recognition procedure. Multinational companies must draft and submit draft BCRs to the DPC for its approval. The Irish DPC acted as the lead authority for approval of the Intel Corporation’s BCRs in January 2012.

Security

Data controllers and data processors must take appropriate security measures against unauthorized access to or unauthorized alteration, disclosure or destruction of, personal data, particularly where the processing involves the transmission of data over a network and against all other forms of processing.

As to the level of security required, data controllers and data processors must put in place appropriate security provisions for the protection of personal data, having regard to:

  • the current state of technological development;
  • the cost of implementing security measures;
  • the nature of the personal data; and
  • the harm that might result from unauthorized processing or loss of the data concerned.

Data controllers and data processors are also obliged to take all reasonable steps to ensure that their employees and other persons at the place of work concerned are aware of and comply with the relevant security measures.

Breach notification

The DPC has published a Personal Data Security Breach Code (“Code”) which states that the DPC must be notified of any unauthorized disclosure of personal data except in limited circumstances. These are where the disclosure:

  • affects less than one hundred individuals;
  • the loss of sensitive personal or financial data is not involved; and
  • the affected individuals have been informed.

Under the privacy Regulations, data breaches in relation to electronic communication networks or services must be notified to the Data Protection Commissioner. Where the breach is likely to affect the personal data or privacy of a subscriber, affected subscribers must also be notified.

In very limited circumstances, data controllers can take the view that affected data subjects do not need to be notified if measures have been taken which will make the data inaccessible to unauthorized users; such technical measures could include encryption.

Enforcement

The DPC is responsible for the enforcement of the DPA and the ePrivacy Regulations.

A breach of specific provisions of the DPA can result in criminal liability. These include:

  • the failure of a data controller or data processor to register;
  • the disclosure of personal data which was obtained without authority; and
  • the failure to comply with an Enforcement Notice. Persons found guilty of offences under the DPA may be liable:
  • on summary conviction (before a district judge sitting alone), to a fine not exceeding EUR 3,000; or
  • on conviction on indictment (before a judge and jury), to a fine not exceeding EUR 100,000. Breaching other provisions of the DPA do not in themselves give rise to criminal liability, but the DPC may investigate the incident and issue an “Enforcement Notice” compelling a data controller to comply with the DPA. Failure to comply with an Enforcement Notice is an offence.

The ePrivacy Regulations prescribe fines for failure to report data breaches, inadequate security measures and sending of unsolicited communications (spam) with regard to electronic communication networks and services.

In addition to specific penalties arising out of enforcement actions, a breach of the DPA can also give rise to reputational damage, particularly if the DPC publishes details of the breach in his Annual Report or issues a press release (as he does from time to time).

In 2011 the DPC investigated 1,161 complaints (of these, 183 related to a co-ordinated action against one data controller with regard to access rights). This is a record high and represents a sharp increase on the 783 complaints filed in 2010. Approximately 22% of the complaints

lodged in 2011 concerned breaches of the ePrivacy Regulations. The remaining 78% related to breaches of the DPA.

Complaints concerning access rights accounted for approximately 48% of the overall total.

Electronic Marketing

The privacy Regulations implement the anti-spam rules set out in Article 13 of the Privacy and Electronic Communications Directive (as amended by the Citizens’ Rights Directive). These regulations came into effect on 1 July 2011.

Direct marketing emails can generally only be sent to users with their prior consent. A limited exemption is available for direct marketing emails sent to existing customers to promoting other products or services similar to those previously purchased by that consumer (such emails can only be sent for 12 months, the customer must have been given the opportunity to object

when the details were collected and the product or service being marketed must be a product or

service offered by the person with the existing relationship with the customer)

B2B direct marketing emails can generally be sent unless the recipient has informed the sender that it does not consent to the receipt of such messages.

The identity of the sender must not be disguised or concealed and the recipient must be offered an opt-out.

Direct marketing calls (excluding automated calls) may be made to a landline provided the subscriber has not previously objected to receiving such calls or noted his or her preference not to receive direct marketing calls in the National Directory Database. Direct marketing calls cannot be made to a mobile phone without prior consent.

One cannot send a direct marketing fax to an individual subscriber in the absence of prior consent. One can send such a fax to a corporate subscriber unless that subscriber has previously instructed the sender that it does not wish to receive such communications or has recorded a general opt-out to receiving such direct marketing faxes in the National Directory Database.

Breach of these anti-spam rules is a criminal offence. On a summary prosecution (before a judge sitting alone) a maximum fine of EUR 5,000 per message sent can be handed down. On conviction on indictment (before a judge a jury) a company may be fined up to

EUR 250,000 per message sent and an individual may be fined up to EUR 50,000 per message.

Online Privacy (including Cookies and Location Data)

Cookies – Consent is needed for the use of cookies unless the cookie is strictly necessary for the provision of a service to that subscriber or user. The 2011 Regulations expressly refer to the use of browser settings as a means to obtain consent. There is no express requirement for consent

to be “prior” to the use of a cookie. A user must be provided with “clear and comprehensive information” about the cookie (including, in particular, its purposes). This information must be prominently displayed and easily accessible. The methods adopted for giving information and obtaining consent should be as “user friendly” as possible.

The DPC has provided regulatory guidance on the use of cookies which can be accessed at:

http://www.dataprotection.ie/documents/guidance/Electronic_Communications_Guidance.pdf.

Location Data – One cannot process location data unless either (i) such data has been made anonymous or (ii) user consent has been obtained.

A provider of electronic communication networks or services or associated facilities (i.e. a telco) must inform its users of (i) the type of location data (other than traffic data) that will be processed, (ii) the purpose and duration of the processing and (iii) whether the data will be transmitted to a third party to provide a value added service. Users can withdraw their consent to the processing of location data.

(Passed on:22 July 1995)

38. The prevention of Corruption Acts, 1889 to 1916, shall be amended as follows:

(A) In the Public Bodies Corrupt Practices Act, 1889 –

(i) in section 1 –

(I) by the substitution for “any member, officer or servant of”, in each place where it occurs in subsection (1) and (2), of “an office holder or his or her special adviser or a director of, or occupier of a position of employment in”, and

(II) the substitution for “public body”, where it secondly occurs in subsection (1) and (2), of “office holder or public body”, and

(ii) in section 2, by the substitution of the following paragraph (a):

“(I) if the conviction is a summary conviction, be liable to a fine not exceeding £ 1,000 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months or to both, or

(II) if the conviction is on indictment, be liable to a fine not exceeding £50,000 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 7 years or to both, and paragraphs (b) to (e) of this subsection shall apply only if the conviction is on indictment ;

and”,

(iii)in section 7, by the substitution of the following definitions for the definitions of “public body” and “public office”; “public office” means any office or employment of a person as an office holder or special adviser or as a director of, or occupier of a position of employment in, a public body; “director”, “office holder”, public body” and “special adviser” have the meaning assigned to them by the Ethics in Public Office Act, 1995:”,

(B) In section 1 of the Prevention of Corruption Act, 1906 –

(i)in subsection (1), by the substitution for the words from “and shall be liable” to the end of the subsection, of “and shall be liable” –

(I)on summary conviction, to a fine not exceeding £ 1, 000 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months or to both, or

(II) on conviction on indictment, to a fine not exceeding £ 50,000 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 7 years or to both.”,

(ii) by the substitution of the following subsection (3):

“In this Act, ‘agent’ also includes an office holder or a director (within the meaning, in each case, of the Public Bodies Corrupt Practices Act, 1889, as amended) of, and a person occupying a position of employment in, a public body (within the meaning aforesaid) and a special adviser (within the meaning aforesaid).”, and

(C) In the Prevention of Corruption Act, 1916 –

(i) by the deletion of section 1,

(ii) by the substitution of the following section for section 2:

“Where in any proceedings against a person for an offence under the Prevention of Corruption Act, 1906, as amended, or the Public Bodies Corruption Practices Act, 1889, as amended, it is proved that any money, gift or other consideration has been paid or given to or received by an office holder or special adviser or a director of, or occupier of a position of employment in, a public body by or from a person or agent of a person holding or seeking to obtain a contract from a Minister of the Government or a public body, the money, gift or consideration shall be deemed to have been paid or given and received corruptly as such inducement or reward as is mention in such Act unless the contrary is proved.”, and

(iii) in section 4, by the substitution of the following subsection (2) and (3):

“In this Act ‘director’, ‘office holder’, ‘special adviser’ and ‘public body’ have the meanings assigned to them by the Public Bodies Corrupt Practices Act, 1889, as amended, and ‘agent’ and ‘consideration’ have the meanings assigned to them by the Prevention of Corruption Act, 1906, as amended.”,

and the said section 1, as amended by this section, of the Public Bodies Corrupt Practices, 1889, is set out in the Table to this section.

Table

(1) Every person who shall by himself or by or in conjunction with any other person, corruptly solicit or receive, or agree to receive, for himself, or for any other person, any gift, loan, fee, reward, or advantage whatever as an inducement to, or reward for, or otherwise on account of an office holder or his or her special adviser or a director of, or occupier of a position of employment in, a public body as in this Act defined, doing or forbearing to do anything in respect of any matter or transaction whatsoever, actual or proposed, in which the said office holder or public body is concerned, shall be guilty of a misdemeanour.

(2) Every person who shall by himself or by or in conjunction with any other person corruptly give, promise, or offer any gift, loan, fee, reward, or advantage whatsoever to any person, whether for the benefit or that person or of another person, as an inducement to or reward for or otherwise on account of an office holder or his or her special adviser or a director of, or occupier of a position of employment in, any public body as in this Act defined, doing or forbearing to do anything in respect of any matter or transaction whatsoever, actual or proposed, in which such office holder or public body as aforesaid is concerned, shall be guilty of a misdemeanour.

(Number 31 of 2001, Enacted on 14th July, 2001)

Be it enacted by the Oireachtas as follows:

1.—(1) In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires—‘‘the Act of 1997’’ means the Electoral Act, 1997; ‘‘the Acts’’ means—

(a) the Tax Acts,

(b) the Capital Acquisitions Tax Act, 1976, and the enactments amending or extending that Act,

(c) the Capital Gains Tax Acts, and

(d) the Value-Added Tax Act, 1972, and the enactments amending or extending that Act; ‘‘application statement’’ means a statement issued under section 25(4); ‘‘Collector-General’’ means the Collector-General appointed under section 851 of the Taxes Consolidation Act, 1997; ‘‘the Commission’’ means the Standards in Public Office Commission established by section 21 (as amended by this Act) of the Principal Act; ‘‘donation’’ has the meaning assigned to it by Part IV of the Electoral Act, 1997;

‘‘head’’, in relation to a public body, has the meaning assigned by the Freedom of Information Act, 1997, to head, in relation to a public body (within the meaning of that Act), with any necessary modifications; ‘‘inquiry officer’’ shall be construed in accordance with section 6;‘‘the Principal Act’’ means the Ethics in Public Office Act, 1995; ‘‘senior office’’ means—

(a) a designated directorship of a public body specified in subparagraphs (8) to (12), or standing prescribed under subparagraph (13), of paragraph 1 of the First Schedule to the Principal Act, or

(b) a designated position in a public body,

in relation to which the remuneration is not less than the lowest remuneration in relation to the position of Deputy Secretary General in the Civil Service (within the meaning of the Civil Service Regulation Act, 1956);

‘‘tax clearance certificate’’ means a certificate issued under section 25(1).

(2) A word or expression that is used in this Act and also in the Principal Act shall, unless the context otherwise requires, have the same meaning in this Act as it has in the Principal Act.

(3) In this Act—

(a) a reference to a section or Schedule is a reference to a section of, or a Schedule to, this Act, unless it is indicated that reference to some other provision is intended,

(b) a reference to a subsection, paragraph or subparagraph is a reference to a subsection, paragraph or subparagraph of the provision in which the reference occurs, unless it is indicated that reference to some other provision is intended, and

(c) a reference to any enactment shall be construed as a reference to that enactment as amended, adapted or extended by or under any subsequent enactment.

2.—Section 21 of the Principal Act is hereby amended by the substitution of the following subsections for subsections (1) and (2):

‘‘(1) There is hereby established, in place of the Public Offices Commission, a commission (which shall be known as the Standards in Public Office Commission and is referred to in this Act as ‘the Commission’).

(2) The Commission shall consist of 6 members, namely—

(a) a chairperson who shall be a judge, or a former judge, of the Supreme Court or the High Court, and

(b) the following ordinary members—

(i) the Comptroller and Auditor General,

(ii) the Ombudsman,

(iii) the Clerk of Da´ il E´ ireann,

(iv) the Clerk of Seanad E´ ireann, and

(v) a person who—

(I) is appointed to be such a member by the Government following resolutions passed by each House approving the proposed appointment, and

(II) is a former member of one of the Houses and is not a representative in the European Parliament.

(2A) The appointment of a person to be the chairperson of the Commission shall be made by the President on the advice of the Government following resolutions passed by each House recommending the appointment.

(2B) A person appointed to be the chairperson of the Commission—

(a) may at his or her own request be relieved of office by the President, and

(b) may be removed from office by the President but shall not be removed from office except for stated misbehaviour, incapacity or bankruptcy and then only following resolutions passed by each House calling for his or her removal.

(2C) Subject to the provisions of this section, a person appointed to be the chairperson of the Commission shall hold office for a term of 6 years and may be re-appointed to that office for a second or subsequent term.

(2D) The chairperson of the Commission (other than a chairperson who is the holder of a judicial office) shall be paid such remuneration (if any) as may be determined by the Minister.

(2E) (a) If the chairperson of the Commission notifies the Minister that he or she is for any reason temporarily unable to act as such chairperson, the Minister shall appoint such person, being a judge, or a former judge, of the Supreme Court or the High Court, as the Chief Justice may nominate for the purpose to act as such chairperson for the duration of such inability.

(b) Upon the appointment of a person pursuant to paragraph (a) to be the chairperson of the Commission, the person who is temporarily unable to act as such chairperson shall be deemed for the duration of the inability not to be the chairpersonand not to be a member of the Commission.

(2F) If the person who is the chairperson of the Commission ceases (otherwise than by death or removal from office) during his or her term of office as such chairperson to be a judge of the High Court and is not a judge of the Supreme Court or so ceases to be a judge of the Supreme Court, he or she shall continue to be such chairperson until the expiration of his or her term of office. (2G) If, after the commencement of an investigation under section 23 and before compliance by the Commission with section 24 in relation to the investigation, a person who is an ordinary member of the Commission ceases (otherwise than by death or by removal from office) to hold the office by reference to which he or she was a member of the Commission, the person shall, subject to his or her consent, continue to be a member of the Commission for the purposes of the investigation until section 24 is complied with in relation to the investigation unless the Commission determines otherwise.

(2H) An ordinary member of the Commission appointed to be such member under subsection (2)(b)(v)—

(a) shall hold office for a term of 6 years and may be reappointed to that office for a second or subsequent term,

(b) shall cease to hold office if he or she—

(i) is nominated as a member of Seanad E´ ireann,

(ii) is nominated for election as a member of either House or to be a representative in the European Parliament, or

(iii) is regarded pursuant to Part XIII of the Second Schedule to the European Parliament Elections Act, 1997, as having been elected to that Parliament,

(c) subject to the provisions of this subsection, shall hold office upon such terms and conditions (including terms and conditions relating to remuneration (if any) and allowances (if any) for expenses) as may be determined by the Minister,

(d) may resign from office by notice in writing given to the Minister and the resignation shall take effect on the date on which the Minister receives the notice,

(e) may be removed from office at any time by the Government but shall not be removed from office except for stated misbehaviour, incapacity or bankruptcy and then only following resolutions passed by eachouse calling for his or her removal.

(2I) Notwithstanding anything contained in the Act of 2001or this Act, such functions of the Commission as it may determine may be performed in relation to such matter or matters as it may determine by the Commission consisting only of the chairperson of the Commission, and the Ethics in Public Office Acts, 1995 and 2001, and the Electoral Acts, 1992 to 2001, and any regulations made under section 72 of the Act of 1997 shall have effect accordingly in relation to any such determinations with any necessary modifications.

(2J) The Commission shall from time to time, but not less than twice each year, consult with the Committees in relation to the operation of this Act, the Act of 2001 and, in so far as it is relevant to the functions of the Commission and the Committees, the Electoral Act, 1997, and in relation to such (if any)other matters as they consider appropriate.’’.

3.—In addition to the functions conferred on the Commission by the Principal Act and the other sections of this Act, the Commission shall have the functions conferred on the Public Offices Commission by the Act of 1997.

4.—(1) Where a person (‘‘the complainant’’) considers that—

(a) a specified person or a person who, in relation to a specified person, is a connected person may have done an act or made an omission after the commencement of section that is, or the circumstances of which are, such as to be inconsistent with the proper performance by the specified person of the functions of the office or position by reference to which he or she is such a person or with the maintenance of confidence in such performance by the general public, and the matter is one of significant public importance,

(b) a specified person may have contravened a provision of the Principal Act, or

(c) a specified person may have contravened a provision of the Act of 1997, the complainant may make a complaint in relation to the matter to the Commission.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to an act or omission of a specified person or a person who, in relation to a specified person, is a connected person if it—

(a) relates to a private matter and is unrelated to the functions of the office or position by reference to which the specified person is such a person, or

(b) results from incompetence or inefficiency in the performance of, or from failure to perform, such a function, on the part of the specified person.

(3) A complaint under subsection (1) shall be in writing or in such other form as may be determined by the Minister.

(4) The Commission may request an inquiry officer to carry out a preliminary inquiry into any complaint under subsection (1) falling within paragraph (a) of that subsection unless it considers the complaint to be frivolous or vexatious.

(5) Where the subject matter of a complaint made or referred to the Commission is not, in the opinion of the Commission, of sufficient gravity to warrant investigation by the Commission, the Commission, at its discretion, either, shall not investigate it or shall refer it—

(a) in case it relates to a person who is or, at the time to which the complaint relates, was a member, to such committee of the House concerned as it considers appropriate,

(b) in case it relates to a person who is or, at the time aforesaid, was the holder of a designated directorship or any directorship, or the occupier of a designated position or any position, in a public body, to the head of the body,

(c) in case it relates to a person who is or was at the time aforesaid a special adviser, to the office holder to whom he or she is or was acting as special adviser.

(6) (a) In subsection (1), ‘‘specified person’’ means a person who—

(i) is or, at the time to which the complaint concerned relates, was an office holder or the holder of the office of Attorney General but not a member,

(ii) is or, at the time aforesaid, was a special adviser or held a designated directorship of, or occupied a designated position, in a public body, or

(iii) holds or occupies or, at the time aforesaid, held or occupied a directorship or a position of employment in a public body.

(b) Without prejudice to the generality of the expression ‘‘significant public importance’’ in subsection (1), a matter shall, if the Commission consider it appropriate to do so having regard to all the circumstances, be deemed by it, for the purposes of that subsection, to be of significant public importance if it relates to a benefit alleged to have been received by a specified person or a person who, in relation to a specified person, is a connected person and, in the opinion of the Commission, the value of the benefit was, is or might have been or be expected to be or to become not less than £10,000.

5.—(1) Where a person (‘‘the complainant’’)—

(a) in good faith makes a complaint under this Act or the Principal Act to the Commission, a Committee or a Clerk, and

(b) reasonably believes that the complaint has been made to the appropriate person and is one that falls to be investigated under the Principal Act, no cause of action shall lie against the person, and no disciplinary action shall be taken against him or her, in respect of, or of any matter arising from—

(i) the complaint,

(ii) the furnishing of information to the Commission, a Committee, a Clerk or an inquiry officer in relation to the complaint,

(iii) the performance by the Commission, a Committee, a Clerk or an inquiry officer of a function of it or of his or hers under this Act or the Principal Act in relation to the complaint.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to a complainant who makes a complaint referred to in that subsection knowing it to be false, misleading, frivolous or vexatious or who furnishes information to the Commission, a Committee, a Clerk or an inquiry officer that he or she knows to be false or misleading.

(3) Where an employer dismisses an employee to whom the Unfair Dismissals Act, 1977, applies and the dismissal constitutes disciplinary action taken in contravention of subsection (1) in relation to the employee, the dismissal is a dismissal deemed for the purposes of that Act, by virtue of section 6(2)(f) thereof, to be an unfair dismissal.

(4) A person who takes disciplinary action in contravention of subsection (1) in relation to another person shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable—

(a) on summary conviction, to a fine not exceeding £1,500,

(b) on conviction on indictment, to a fine not exceeding £50,000.

(5) (a) In this section ‘‘disciplinary action’’ means an act—

(i) that is done in relation to a complainant, whether as respects the employment of the complainant or otherwise, and

(ii) that is wholly or mainly intended as punishment or retaliation for the complaint concerned, a matter referred to in subsection (1) or an action referred to in paragraph (ii) or (iii) of that subsection.

(b) Where an act referred to in paragraph (a) is done by a person acting at the instigation, or on behalf, of the person the subject of a complaint referred to in subsection (1), both of those persons shall be deemed, for the purposes of subsection (4), to have taken disciplinary action in contravention of subsection (1) in relation to the complainant.

(c) In paragraph (a) the reference to the doing of an act includes a reference to the making of an omission.

6.—(1) The Commission may authorise such and so many persons as it may determine (referred to in this Act as ‘‘inquiry officers’’) to perform the functions conferred on inquiry officers by this section.

(2) Whenever so requested by the Commission, an inquiry officer shall, for the purpose of assisting it in the performance of its functions, carry out a preliminary inquiry into a complaint under section 22 of the Principal Act or section 4 by—

(a) requesting the person who made the complaint, or any other person whose evidence would or might, in the opinion of the officer, be relevant to the inquiry, at the option of the person, to—

(i) provide him or her with a statement in writing of the evidence that the person would give to the Commission in relation to the matter at an investigation of the complaint by the Commission under section 23 of the Principal Act, or (ii) make a statement of the evidence aforesaid at a meeting with him or her which the officer shall write down, within such reasonable period as may be specified by the officer,

(b) furnishing the person against whom the complaint is made with particulars of the complaint and copies of the statement or statements under paragraph (a) and with copies of any relevant documents and requesting the person, at the option of the person, to—

(i) provide him or her with a statement in writing of the evidence that the person would give to the Commission in relation to the matter at such an investigation as aforesaid in relation to the matter, or

(ii) make a statement of the evidence aforesaid at a meeting with him or her which the officer shall write down, within such reasonable period as may be specified by the officer, and

(c) where appropriate, conducting interviews with the persons referred to in paragraphs (a) and (b), and questioning them, for the purpose of the making of the statements aforesaid.

(3) Following an inquiry pursuant to subsection (2), the inquiry officer concerned shall prepare a report in writing of the results of the inquiry and shall furnish the report and the statement or statements under subsection (2) and any relevant documents to the Commission; and the report shall not contain any determinations or findings, but shall, if the Commission so requests, include an expression of the opinion of the officer as to whether there is prima facie evidence to sustain the complaint concerned.

(4) A statement under subsection (2) shall be signed (or, where necessary, otherwise identified) by the person by whom it was made and, if the statement was made pursuant to paragraph (a)(ii) or

(b)(ii) of that subsection, the signing shall be effected in the presence of the inquiry officer concerned, who shall then sign the statement.

(5) An inquiry officer may request the production by a person of any document in the possession or control of the person that the officer considers relevant to his or her inquiry.

(6) Where a document is produced by a person to an inquiry officer pursuant to a request under subsection (5), the officer may, with the consent of the person, retain the document in his or her possession for a reasonable period for the purpose of examining and copying it.

(7) A person being interviewed pursuant to subsection (2) may decline to answer any question asked, or refuse a request to produce a document made, by the inquiry officer concerned and may terminate the interview at any time and a person to whom a request is made under subsection (2) or (5) may refuse to comply with the request.

(8) An inquiry officer shall be furnished with the authorisation under subsection (1) relating to him or her and, when exercising a power under this section, shall, if so requested by a person affected, produce the authorisation or a copy of it to the person.

7.—Section 23 of the Principal Act is hereby amended by the substitution of the following subsections for subsection (1):

‘‘(1) (a) Subject to the provisions of this section, where a complaint is made to the Commission under section 4 of the Act of 2001 or made or referred to it under section 22 or the Commission considers it appropriate to do so, the Commission shall carry out an investigation to determine whether, as appropriate—

(i) the person concerned or a connected person has done a specified act, or

(ii) the person concerned has contravened Part II, III or IV or the Act of 1997.

(b) Subject to the provisions of this section, where the Commission considers in the case of—

(i) a person who may have contravened Part II, III or IV or the Act of 1997 at a time when he or she was an office holder,

(ii) a person who is an office holder and who may have contravened Part II or the Act of 1997 before becoming an office holder,

(iii) a person to whom section 22(4)(b)(i) applies and who may have contravened Part IV, or

(iv) a person who may have done a specified act, that it is appropriate to do so, it shall carry out an investigation to determine, whether, as may be appropriate—

(I) the person referred to in subparagraph (i) contravened Part II, III or IV or the Act of 1997 at a time when he or she was an office holder,

(II) the person referred to in subparagraph (ii) contravened Part II or the Act of 1997 before becoming an office holder,

(III) the person referred to in subparagraph (iii) contravened Part IV, or

(IV) the person referred to in subparagraph (iv) did a specified act.

(1A) The Commission shall not carry out an investigation under subsection (1) into a complaint under subsection (1) of section 4 of the Act of 2001 in relation to a matter referred to in paragraph (a) of that subsection unless—

(a) the complaint was made or referred to it by a Committee, or

(b) the Commission becomes of opinion, after consideration by it of any report of an inquiry officer in relation to the matter and any statements or documents accompanying the report, that there is sufficient evidence to establish a prima facie case in relation to the alleged specified act concerned and that, if it was in fact done, it is an act falling within the said paragraph (a).

(1B) The Commission shall not investigate a complaint by a person other than a member or a person referred to in paragraph

(c) or (d) of section 22(4) if it considers the complaint to be frivolous or vexatious.

(1C) Subject to subsection (1A)(b), if the Commission becomes of opinion that evidence sufficient to sustain a complaint referred or made to it under section 22 or section 4 of the Act of 2001 is not and will not be available, it may decide not to carry out, or to discontinue, an investigation under this section and, if it does so, it shall prepare a record of the decision and subsections (1) and (4) of section 24 shall apply in relation to such a record as it applies to a report under subsection (1) of that section with any necessary modifications.’’.

8.—The Commission or a Committee shall not investigate a complaint made or referred to it unless the identity of the person making the complaint is disclosed to it. Where, having regard to all the circumstances, the Commission or a Committee considers it appropriat to do so, it may restrict the disclosure of such identity to those to whom knowledge of it is necessary or expedient for the purposes or by reason of the investigation of the complaint by the Commission or the Committee, as the case may be, or otherwise in the interests of justice.

9.—(1) Where following an investigation by the Commission under section 23 of the Principal Act or an investigation by a Committee under section 9 of that Act, the Commission or the Committee, as the case may be, is of opinion that, having regard to the findings of the Commission or the Committee, as the case may be, and all other relevant matters (including failure to co-operate with or provide assistance to or knowingly giving false or misleading information to the Commission or the Committee), there are sufficient reasons rendering it equitable to do so, the Commission or the Committee, as the case may be, may, either of its own motion or on the application of any person appearing before it, order—

(a) that the whole or part of the costs necessarily incurred, by any person appearing before it, as taxed by a Taxing Master of the High Court, shall be paid to the person by any other person named in the order, or

(b) that the whole or part of the costs incurred by it, as taxed as aforesaid, shall be paid to the Minister for Finance by any other person named in the order.

(2) Any sum payable pursuant to an order under this section shall be recoverable as a simple contract debt in any court of competent jurisdiction.

(3) Any sum payable by the Minister for Finance pursuant to an order under this section shall be paid out of moneys provided by the Oireachtas.

10.—(1) A Committee shall, after consultation with the Commission, from time to time draw up codes of conduct for the guidance of members (other than office holders) of the House concerned.

(2) The Government shall from time to time draw up codes of conduct for the guidance of office holders, and section 15(4)(c) of the Principal Act shall apply to the draft of any such code of conduct as it applies to a draft referred to in the said section 15(4)(c) with any necessary modifications.

(3) The Minister shall from time to time draw up codes of conduct for the guidance of persons who hold or occupy directorships or positions of employment in public bodies but before doing so shall consult with the Commission and such persons representative of those persons as he or she considers appropriate.

(4) A code of conduct under subsection (1), (2) or (3)—

(a) may be amended by another code of conduct under that subsection,

(b) may be revoked by another code of conduct under that subsection replacing the first-mentioned code or amending another code of conduct under that subsection, or

(c) may be revoked by an instrument in writing that neither replaces nor amends another code of conduct under that subsection and is made in the manner in which the code of conduct being revoked was made.

(5) A code of conduct under subsection (1) shall, if the House concerned so declares by resolution, apply to its members on and from the date specified in the resolution, and such a code of conduct shall, if the House concerned so declares, cease to apply to its members, on and from the date specified in the resolution.

(6) A code of conduct under subsection (1), (2) or (3) or a code of conduct replacing such a code shall indicate the standards of conduct and integrity for the persons to whom it relates in the performance of their functions and in relation to any matter connected with or affecting or likely or appearing to affect such performance and in relation to such other matters (if any) as may be specified in the code.

(7) A person to whom a code of conduct under this section relates shall, in so far as it is relevant, have regard to and be guided by the code in the performance of his or her functions and in relation to any other matters to which the code relates.

(8) A document purporting to be a code of conduct under subsection (1), (2) or (3) or an instrument under subsection (4)(c) shall be taken, unless the contrary is shown, to be such code or instrument and shall be admissible in any proceedings before a court or othertribunal or a Committee or the Commission, and any provision of any such code that appears to the tribunal, the Committee or the Commission to be relevant to a question in the proceedings may be taken into account by it in determining the question. (9) There shall, as respects a person to whom subsection (3) applies, be deemed to be included in the terms or conditions upon which the person holds the directorship or special advisership, or occupies the position, concerned a provision requiring the person to have regard to and be guided in so far as it is relevant by the code of conduct under that subsection in the performance of the functions of that directorship, special advisership or position and in relation to any other matters specified in the code.

(10) A code of conduct under subsection (1), (2) or (3) shall not make provision in relation to any matter in so far as, in the opinion of—

(a) in the case of such a code under subsection (1), the Committee concerned formed after consultation with the Commission, and

(b) in the case of such a code under subsection (2) or (3), the Government or the Minister, as may be appropriate, adequate provision in relation to that matter is made in an existing code of conduct or in existing guidelines.

(11) A code of conduct under subsection (1), (2) or (3) or an instrument under subsection (4)(c) shall be published by the Commission in such form and manner as it may determine.

(12) The Commission may, at the request of an office holder, give advice to the office holder—

(a) in relation to the application or non-application of a code of conduct drawn up under subsection (2) or (3) or any other code of conduct or any guidelines to any particular case or circumstance specified by the member and affecting or relating to him or her or to any conduct or proposed conduct of the member, and

(b) in a case or in circumstances where such a code applies or such guidelines apply, in relation to the effect and consequences of such application.

(13) The appropriate Committee may, at the request of a member (other than an office holder), give advice to the member—

(a) in relation to the application or non-application of a code of conduct drawn up, after consultation with it, under subsection (1) or any other code of conduct or any guidelines to any particular case or circumstance specified by the member and affecting or relating to him or her or to any conduct or proposed conduct of the member, and

(b) in a case or in circumstances where such a code applies or such guidelines apply, in relation to the effect and consequences of such application.

(14) Where a request is made under subsection (12) or (13)—

(a) the office holder or member concerned shall furnish to the Commission or, as the case may be, the Committee concerned such information as it may reasonably require for the purposes of its functions under that subsection, and

(b) the Commission or, as the case may be, the Committee shall furnish the advice requested to the office holder or member within 21 days from the receipt by it of the request or, if it is later, from the receipt by it of the information referred to in paragraph (a).

(15) Advice furnished to an office holder or member under this section shall have effect in relation to the person to whom it is given as if it formed part of the code of conduct or guidelines to which it relates.

(16) The reference in section 28(3) of the Principal Act to guidelines published or advice given in writing under section 12 shall be construed as including a reference to a code of conduct drawn upunder subsection (1) or (2) and any other relevant code of conduct or other guidelines or advice given in writing under subsection (12) or (13).

11.—An individual to whom a statement in writing is furnished pursuant to section 17 or 18 of the Principal Act—

(a) may request the person who so furnished it (‘‘the furnisher’’) to provide him or her with information in relation to the statement or any matter arising in connection with it,

(b) if he or she considers that the furnisher may have contravened Part IV, he or she may make a complaint in writing in relation to the matter to the Commission—

(i) in case the furnisher is a civil servant (within the meaning of the Civil Service Regulation Act, 1956), under paragraph (d) of section 22(4) of the Principal Act as if the individual was the appropriate authority in relation to the civil servant (within the meaning aforesaid) and the said paragraph (d) and any other relevant provision of the Principal Act shall apply accordingly as if the individual was such an authority with any necessary modifications,

(ii) in any other case, under paragraph (c) of the said section 22(4) as if the individual was the public body concerned and the said paragraph (c) and any other relevant provision of the Principal Act shall apply accordingly as if the individual was such a body with any necessary modifications, and

(c) if the Commission carries out an investigation under section 23 of the Principal Act into the matter, shall furnish to the public body concerned a copy of the report in writing of the Commission of the result of the investigation a copy of which is furnished to the individual.

12.—For the purposes of the Principal Act and notwithstanding anything in that Act—

(a) in relation to Da´ il E´ ireann and its members and Clerk, the registration date immediately following 31 January 2001 shall be 31 December 2001, and each subsequent registration date shall be the date of each anniversary of the latter date or, if on any such date (‘‘the specified date’’) Da´ il E´ ireann stands dissolved, the date that is 30 days after the date of the first meeting of Da´ il E´ i

(Adopted on 30th August 1889)

Chapter LXIX

An Act for the more effectual Prevent and Punishment of Bribery and Corruption of and by Members, Officers, or Servants of Corporations, Councils, Boards, Commission or other Public Bodies.[11] [30th August 1889] [Preamble] Corruption in Office a misdemeanour.1. – (1) Every person who shall by himself or by or in conjunction with any other person, corruptly solicit or receive, or agree to receive, for himself, or for any other person, any gift, loan, fee, reward, or advantage whatever as an inducement to, or reward for, or otherwise on account of any member, officer or servant of a public body as in this Act defined, doing or forbearing to do anything in respect of any matter or transaction whatsoever, actual or proposed, in which the said public body is concerned, shall be guilty of a misdemeanour. (2) Every person who shall by himself or by or in conjunction with any person corruptly give, promise, or offer any gift, loan, fee, reward, or advantage whatsoever to any person, whether for the benefit of that person or of another person, as an inducement to or reward for or otherwise on account of any member, officer, or servant, of any public body as in this Act defined, doing or forbearing to do anything in respect of any matter or transaction whatsoever, actual or proposed, in which such public body as aforesaid is concerned, shall be guilty of a misdemeanour. Penalty for offences2. Any person on conviction for offending as aforesaid shall, at the discretion of the court before which he is convicted, ­(a) be liable to be imprisoned for any period not exceeding two years, with or without hard labour, or to pay a fine not exceeding five hundred pounds, or to both such imprisonment and such fine; and (b) in addition be liable to be ordered to pay such body, and in such manner as the court directs, the amount or value of any gift, loan, fee, or reward received by him or any part thereof; and (c) be liable to be adjudged incapable of being elected or appointed to any public office for seven years from the date of his conviction, and to forfeit any such office held by him at the time of his conviction, and to forfeit any such office held by him at the time of his conviction; and (d) in the event of a second conviction for a like offence he shall, in addition to the foregoing penalties, be liable to be adjudged to be for ever incapable of holding any public office, and to be incapable for seven years of being registered as an elector, or voting at an election either of members to serve in Parliament or of members of any public body, and the enactments for preventing the voting and registration of persons declared by reason of corrupt practices to be incapable of voting shall apply to a person adjudged in pursuance of this section to be incapable of voting; and (e) if such person is an officer or servant in the employ of any public body upon such conviction he shall, at the discretion of the court, be liable to forfeit his right and claim to any compensation or pension to which he would otherwise have been entitled.

Police Background Check Procedures

Who can apply?

•  The individual must directly apply. Third party representatives may be appointed to apply on
their behalf.
•  Northern Irish (NI) applicants cannot apply through this scheme and must visit Access NorthernIreland:http://www.dojni.gov.uk/accessni for further information and guidance.

What must the applicant supply?

Under the Data Protection Act 1988/2003, all applicants must be made in writing, to include:
•  The type of information request (i.e. a request for all criminal record data under the Data
Protection Act 1988/2003)
•  Full name and any previous names (if applicable)
•  Current address
•  Date of Birth
•  Applicant ́s signature
•  Previous addresses if inside ROI

What are the costs / turnaround times?

•  Fee of €6.35 (GBP£ 5.60) payable by cheque, postal order or bank draft should be made out to„The Accountant, Department of Justice‟ Cash and foreign currency not accepted.
•  Turnaround of up to 40 days, subject toreceipt of complete application and fee.

Contact Details

Requests can be written free-formed, or via an application form downloadable here:
http://www.garda.ie/Controller.aspx?Page=1548&Lang=1

Applicants must then post to:

Inspector in Charge
Garda Central Vetting Unit
Racecourse Road
Thurles
Co. Tipperary
Tel: (+35) 3 504 273 00
Fax: (+35) 3 504 273 73
Website:http://www.garda.ie/Controller.aspx?Page=66
NB-For employers based in Northern Ireland, the contact details of Access Northern Ireland are:
Access Northern Ireland
Brooklyn
65 Knock Road
Belfast BT5 6LE
Northern Ireland
Tel: 02890 259 100)

Ireland – Know Your Customer (KYC) Rules

Ireland is a significant European financial hub, with offices of a number of international banks established in Dublin. The primary sources of funds laundered in Ireland are prostitution, cigarette smuggling, drug trafficking, fuel laundering, domestic tax violations and welfare fraud. While money laundering occurs via credit institutions such as banks, money has also been laundered through schemes involving remittance companies, solicitors, accountants, and second-hand car dealerships.

According to law enforcement officials, money is most commonly laundered through the purchase of high value goods for cash; the transfer of funds from overseas through Irish credit institutions; the filtering of funds via complex company structures; and the purchase in Ireland of Irish and foreign real property.

KNOW-YOUR-CUSTOMER (KYC) RULES:

Enhanced due diligence procedures for PEPs:

A PEP is an abbreviation for Politically Exposed Person, a term that describes a person who has been entrusted with a prominent public function, or an individual who is closely related to such a person. The terms PEP, Politically Exposed Person and Senior Foreign Political Figure are often used interchangeably

    • Foreign PEP: YES
    • Domestic PEP: YES

Ireland – KYC covered entities

The following is a list of Know Your Customer entities covered by Irish Law:

    • Banks
    • Building societies
    • The post office
    • Stock brokers
    • Credit unions
    • Bureaux de change
    • Life insurance companies
    • Insurance brokers

Ireland – Suspicious Transaction Reporting (STR) Requirements:

Number of STRs received and time frame: 13,416 in 2010

The following is a list of STR covered entities covered by Irish Law:

    • Banks
    • Building societies
    • The post office
    • Stock brokers
    • Credit unions
    • Bureaux de change
    • Life insurance companies
    • Insurance brokers

MONEY LAUNDERING CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS/CONVICTIONS:

Prosecutions: 11 in 2010
Convictions: 4 in 2010

ENFORCEMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES AND COMMENTS:

Irish authorities estimate that up to 80% of STRs involve funds derived from domestic tax violations and social welfare fraud.

In 2011, the largest known asset seizures, valued at approximately €500,000 (approximately $660,000), were seized in police raids on a suspected money laundering operation in Ireland. The case is believed to be related to money laundering by a European-based narcotics trafficking organization.

Customs authorities continue to intercept bulk cash from narcotics trafficking being smuggled out of Ireland. The largest interception was in 2010 when a suitcase belonging to an Irish drug trafficker containing 676,000 euros (approximately $895,000) in used bank notes was seized at Dublin International Airport.

On November 9, 2011, Ireland became a party to the UN Convention against Corruption.

The Government of Ireland should establish mechanisms for sharing information with other jurisdictions, outside of the Egmont procedures, and providing assistance in transnational criminal investigations.

Risk

Sovereign risk

A return to solid growth is assisting the process of fiscal consolidation. The debt burden has been eased by a restructuring of debt issued to bail out failed Irish banks in 2010, maturity reprofiling of EU bail-out loans and early repayment of IMF loans. The public debt/GDP ratio fell in 2014 and The Economist Intelligence Unit expects it to follow a declining trend over the medium term. This should maintain the government’s access to market funding on fine terms.

Banking sector risk

Banks’ balance sheets are benefiting from the strengthening of the economy and rising house prices but are still suffering from an overhang of residential mortgage arrears and the impairment of loans to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). In late 2014 Ireland’s two main banks, Bank of Ireland and Allied Irish Banks, passed the asset quality review and stress tests conducted by the European Central Bank (ECB), but a smaller bank, Permanent TSB, is required to make up a substantial capital shortfall.

Political risk

The coalition comprising Fine Gael and the Labour Party has a comfortable majority. But it remains fragile as the erosion of public support has exacerbated ideological differences between the two parties. Disillusionment with the established parties is likely to produce a fragmented parliament after the next general election in early 2016, making government formation difficult.

Economic structure risk

Domestic demand is recovering strongly, helped by rising house prices. But exports (particularly to the US and UK) remain fundamental to the recovery, which would therefore be vulnerable in the event of a renewed deterioration in the global economic outlook. Private indebtedness remains high but deleveraging is proceeding rapidly and the public debt/GDP ratio has peaked.

Travel Risk

Security

The decision to travel is your responsibility. You are also responsible for your personal safety abroad. The purpose of this Travel Advice is to provide up-to-date information to enable you to make well-informed decisions.

Crime

Petty crime (pickpocketing, bag snatching and stealing passports) occurs, particularly in areas frequented by tourists. Violent crime, although rare, occurs in larger cities. Avoid secluded parks and unlit areas.

Car theft is on the rise, especially in Dublin; rental vehicles are especially targeted. Vehicles should be parked in secure parking lots.

Demonstrations

Demonstrations occur and have the potential to suddenly turn violent. They can lead to significant disruptions to traffic and public transportation. Avoid all demonstrations and large gatherings, follow the advice of local authorities and monitor local media.

Scams

Automated banking machine (ABM) card and credit card scams are becoming more common.

See our Overseas Fraud page for more information on scams abroad.

Public Transportation

Taxis are widely available. The tariff structure counts time stopped in traffic as part of the fare. In Dublin, gridlock can prove expensive. Expect long delays during rush hours.

Intercity bus and train services are occasionally affected by overcrowding and traffic congestion or disrupted by strike action.

Ferry services are available between Ireland and the United Kingdom. Ferries can be delayed or cancelled due to weather conditions.

See Transportation Safety in order to verify if national airlines meet safety standards.

General safety information

Exercise normal safety precautions. Ensure that your personal belongings, passports and other travel documents are secure at all times. Avoid showing signs of affluence and carrying large sums of cash.

Emergency services

Address Format

RECIPIENT

[SUBBUILDING]
[BUILDING]
[HOUSE_NUMBER] STREET_NAME
[DEPENDENT_LOCALITY]
[DOUBLE_DEPENDENT_LOCALITY]
LOCALITY
PROVINCE
Ireland

Sample

Mr B Smyth
20 Rock Road
Blackrock
CO DUBLIN
IRELAND

Summary

Calendar GMT Reference Actual Previous Consensus Forecast
2014-09-18 11:00 AM Q2 7.7% 3.8% (R) 3.48%
2014-12-11 11:00 AM Q3 3.50% 7.3% (R)
2015-03-12 11:00 AM Q4 4.1% 4.1% (R) 5% 3.85%
2015-07-03 11:00 AM Q1 4.1% 7.87%
2015-09-18 11:00 AM Q2 2.2%
2015-12-11 11:00 AM Q3 3%

 

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