DENMARK BACKGROUND CHECK

Due to increased misconceptions in the business, it is mandatory to keep a check on the persons who are recruited for different job. This happens because due to prolonged practice in the same field, recruiters do make mistakes which need to be rectified before time until it became the blunder in the firm’s. For that reason, background verifications in Denmark have taken the stand to fight against such persons. Verification is the continuous process which needs to start as and when required by the organizations. The need for verification is must as it will help the businesses in their future running and there will be less chances of fraud. The screeners will provide you with overall services which will be beneficial for your organization.

The requirement of this service is found to be such that need to be rectified as and when necessary. The background verification services in Denmark have been launched so as to get the firms good growth and also keep the firms free from risk. The services has been elaborated to whole of Denmark and also to its nearby countries as Arhus, Aalborg, Copenhagen, Esbjerg, Fredericia, Greve Strand, Horsholm, Horsens, Kolding, Naestved, Odense, Roskilde, Randers, Silkeborg, and Vejle. For any further doubt please visit our website info@backcheckgroup.com which will provide you the exact state of mind.

General Information

GDP USD341.952bn (World ranking 34, World Bank 2014)
Population 5.64 million (World ranking 112, World Bank 2014)
Form of state Constitutional Monarchy
Head of government Lars Lokke Rasmussen (Liberal Party Venstre)
Next elections 2019, legislative

CURRENT LOCAL TIME

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PRODUCTS IN DENMARK

Data Protection

Contribution Details

horten Lawfirm

egil husum Senior

Law

Denmark implemented the EU Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC in June 2000 with the Act on

Processing of Personal Data (“Act”).

Definition of Personal Data

Any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person (data subject).

Definition of sensitive Personal Data

Personal data revealing racial or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious or philosophical

beliefs, trade union membership, or data concerning health or sex life.

National Data Protection authority

Datatilsynet (“DPa”)

borgergade 28, 5

DK 1300 København K

Registration

Unlike most EU Member States, Denmark does not require a general registration of controllers, processing activities or databases with personal information.

However, data processors established in Denmark who offer electronic processing services

must, prior to the commencement of such processing operations, notify the DPA.

Besides this notification requirement, processing of personal data must be notified by the controller to the DPA if the processing includes sensitive or other purely private data. Such a registration should include the following information:

■     the name and address of the controller, his representative (if any) and the processor

(if any);

■     the category of processing and its purpose;

■     a general description of the processing;

■     a description of the categories of data subjects and of the categories of data relating to them;

■     the recipients or categories of recipients to whom the data may be disclosed;

■     intended transfers of data to third countries;

■     a general description of the measures taken to ensure security of processing;

■     the date of the commencement of the processing; and

■     the date of deletion of the data.

Data Protection Officers

There is no requirement for organisations to appoint a data protection officer.

Collection and Processing

Data controllers may collect and process personal data when any of the following

conditions are met:

■     the data subject has given his explicit consent; or

■     processing is necessary for the performance of a contract to which the data subject is party or

in order to take steps at the request of the data subject prior to entering into a contract; or

■     processing is necessary for compliance with a legal obligation to which the controller is

subject;

■     processing is necessary in order to protect the vital interests of the data subject;

■     processing is necessary for the performance of a task carried out in the public interest;

■     processing is necessary for the performance of a task carried out in the exercise of official authority vested in the controller or in a third party to whom the data is disclosed; or

■     processing is necessary for the purposes of the legitimate interests pursued by the controller or by the third party to whom the data is disclosed, and these interests are not overridden by the interests of the data subject.

Sensitive personal data (as detailed above) may be processed only if:

the data subject has given his explicit consent to the processing of such data;

processing is necessary to protect the vital interests of the data subject or of another person where the person concerned is physically or legally incapable of giving his consent;

■     the processing relates to data which has been made public by the data subject; or

■     the processing is necessary for the establishment, exercise or defence of legal claims. Personal data about purely private matters, including data about criminal offences and serious

social problems, may be processed only if:

■     the data subject has given his explicit consent to such disclosure;

■     disclosure takes place for the purpose of pursuing private or public interests which clearly override the interests of secrecy, including the interests of the person to whom the data relate;

■     disclosure is necessary for the performance of the activities of an authority or required for a decision to be made by that authority; or

■     disclosure is necessary for the performance of tasks for an official authority by a person or a company.

Furthermore, the data controller must provide the data subject with the necessary information to fulfill the duty of information, including information about the identity of the controller and the purposes of the processing for which the data is intended and any further information which is necessary having regard to the specific circumstances in which the personal data is collected and/or obtained.

Transfer

Data controllers may transfer personal data out of the European Economic Area (“EEA”)

(insecure third country) if any of the following conditions are met:

■     the data subject has given his explicit consent;

■     the transfer is necessary for the performance of a contract between the data subject and the controller or the implementation of pre contractual measures taken in response to the data subject’s request;

■     the transfer is necessary for the conclusion or performance of a contract concluded in the interest of the data subject between the controller and a third party;

■     the transfer is necessary or legally required on important public interest grounds, or for the

establishment, exercise or defence of legal claims;

■     the transfer is necessary in order to protect the vital interests of the data subject;

■     the transfer is made from a register which according to law or regulations is open to consultation either by the public in general or by any person who can demonstrate legitimate interests, to the extent that the conditions laid down in law for consultation are fulfilled in the particular case;

the transfer is necessary for the prevention, investigation and prosecution of criminal

offences and the execution of sentences or the protection of persons charged, witnesses or other persons in criminal proceedings; or

the transfer is necessary to safeguard public security, the defence of the realm, or national security.

Furthermore, data controllers may transfer personal data out of the EEA, if the transfer is based on the Safe Harbor program (to the USA) or the data exporter and the data importer has entered into standard contractual clauses approved by the EU Commission and these clauses have not been amended.

The DPA may authorize a transfer of personal data to an insecure third country where the controller adduces adequate safeguards with respect to the protection of the rights of the data subject.

Security

Data controllers must implement appropriate technical and organizational security measures to protect data against accidental or unlawful destruction, loss or alteration and against unauthorized disclosure, abuse or other processing in violation of the provisions laid down in the Act. The same applies to data processors.

Breach Notification

There is no mandatory requirement in the Act to report data security breaches or losses to the DPA. However, DPA practice stresses that affected data subjects normally should be informed about breaches.

Enforcment

The DPA, which consists of a Council and a Secretary, is responsible for the supervision of all processing operations covered by the Act. If the DPA becomes aware that a data controller is in breach of the Act, the DPA can state their legal opinion.

Furthermore, the DPA can impose fines and a person who violates the Act is liable to a prison sentence of up to four months.

In addition to this, a controller shall compensate for any damage caused by the processing of personal data in violation of the Act.

Electronic Marketing

The Act will apply to most electronic marketing activities, as there is likely to be processing and use of personal data involved (e.g. an email address is likely to be “personal data” for the purposes of the Act). A company can process data concerning existing customers for marketing of the company’s own products if the processing is necessary for the purposes of the legitimate interests pursued by the company and these interests are not overridden by the interests of the consumer. Besides that, processing of personal data for marketing purposes normally requires consent.

According to the Danish Marketing Practices Act, a trader must not approach anyone by means of electronic mail, an automated calling system or facsimile machine with a view to the sale

of products, real property, other property, labour and services unless the party concerned has requested him to do so. If a trader that has received a customer’s electronic contact details in connection with the sale of products or services, he may market his own similar products or services to that customer by electronic mail, provided that the customer has the option, free

of charge and in an easy manner, of declining this both when giving his contact details to the trader and in the event of subsequent communications.

Online Privacy (including cookies and Location Data)

Directive 2009/136/EC was implemented in the new Danish Act on Electronic Communications Services and Networks which came into force on 25 May 2011 in accordance with the implementation deadline in the Directive.

According to the “Executive Order on Information and Consent Required in Case of Storing and Accessing Information in End-user Terminal Equipment”, which came into force on

14 December 2011, the use of cookies requires consent. The consent must be freely given and specific. However, this does not imply that consent must be obtained each time a cookie is used but a user must be given an option. Furthermore, the consent must be informed which implies that a user must receive information about the consequences of consenting. Finally, the consent must be an informed indication of the user’s wishes. Normally, consent is obtained through

tick-the-box but also the use of a homepage after having received the relevant information concerning cookies can constitute consent. Yet, consent by use of a homepage must be used with caution.

In addition to this, the information to the user must fulfill the below mentioned requirements: (i) The information must be clear and easy to understand; (ii) the purpose of the use of the cookies must be provided; (iii) the identity of the person or entity which is responsible for

the use of the cookies must appear; (iv) the possibility of withdrawal of consent must be easily accessible and be described in the information; and (v) this information must be easily accessible for the user at all times.

(Amended on 30 October 1992)

§75

Annex 6

(1) The proceeds gained from any criminal act, or a sum equivalent thereto, may, either wholly or in part, be confiscated. Where there is no means of establishing the size of such an amount, a sum thought to be equivalent to the proceeds gained may be confiscated.

(2) The following objects may also be confiscated where this must be regarded as necessary in order to prevent further offences, or where additional special circumstances make further offences likely:

(1) Objects which have been used, or were intended to be used, in a criminal act;

(2) Objects produced by a criminal act; and (3) Objects with respect to which a criminal act has otherwise been committed.

(3) In place of confiscation of the objects referred to in subsection (2) above, a sum may instead be confiscated which is equivalent to their value or a part thereof.

(4) In place of confiscation under subsection (2) above, arrangements concerning the objects may instead be decided upon for the purpose of preventing further offences.

(5) When an association is dissolved by judgement, its capital, documents, protocols etc. may be confiscated.

§76

(1) Confiscation under section 75 (1) of this Act may be from any person to whom the proceeds of a criminal act have directly passed.

(2) Confiscation of the objects and amounts referred to in section 75 (2) and (3) of this Act may be from any person who is responsible for the offence and also from someone on whose behalf such a person has acted.

(3) Specially protected rights over confiscated objects lapse only after the court’s decision under circumstances similar to those referred to in subsection (2) above.

(4) Where one of the persons referred to in subsections (1) and (2) above has, after the criminal act, disposed of the proceeds or of objects of the kind referred to in section 75 (2) of this Act, or of rights thereover, the transferred property or its value may be confiscated from the acquirer if he knew of the connection of the transferred property to the criminal act, or has displayed gross negligence in this respect, or if the transfer to him was gratuitous.

(5) Where a person who is liable to confiscation under subsections (1)-(4) above dies, his liability lapses. This shall not apply to confiscation under section 75 (1) of this Act.

§77

(1) Where there is confiscation under section 75 (1) of this Act and a person has claim to damages on account of the offence, the confiscated property may be used in satisfaction of the claim of damages.

(2) The same shall apply to goods and money confiscated under section 75 (2) and (3) of this Act, if a decision to this effect is made in the judgement.

(3) Where the offender has, in one of the situations referred to in subsections (1) and (2) above, paid the injured party compensation after judgement, the confiscated sum shall be proportionately reduced.

§77a Where it must be supposed that objects would, because of their character in the light of other existing circumstances, be used in a criminal act, they may be confiscated if that is regarded necessary for the prevention of the criminal act. Section 75 (4) of this Act shall similarly apply here.

§191

(1) Any person who, in contravention of the legislation on euphoriant drugs, supplies such drugs to a considerable number of persons, or in return for a large payment, or in any other particularly aggravating circumstances, shall be liable to imprisonment for any term not exceeding 6 years. If the supply relates to a considerable quantity of a particularly dangerous or harmful drug, or if the transfer of such a drug has otherwise been of a particularly dangerous character, the penalty may be increased to imprisonment for any term not exceeding 10 years.

(2) Similar punishment shall apply to any person who, in contravention of the legislation on euphoriant drugs, imports, exports, buys, distributes, receives, produces, manufactures or possesses such drugs with intention to supply them as mentioned in subsection (1) above.

§191a Any person who receives or provides for himself or others a part of a profit obtained by contravention of section 191 of this Act, and any person who by storing, transporting, assisting in the disposal or in a similar manner acts in order to secure for another person the profit from such contravention, shall be liable to imprisonment for any term not exceeding 6 years.

§276

Any person who, without the consent of the possessor, carries away any tangible object for the purpose of obtaining for himself or for others an unlawful gain by its appropriation shall be guilty of theft. For the purpose of this and the following sections, any quantity of energy that is produced, conserved or utilized for the production of light, heat, power or motion or for any other economic purpose shall be recognized as equivalent to a tangible object.

§277

Any person who, for the purpose of obtaining for himself or for others an unlawful gain, appropriates any tangible object which is not in the custody of any person or which has come into the hands of the perpetrator through carelessness on the part of the owner or in any similar accidental way shall be guilty of misappropriation of objects found.

§278

(1) Any person who, for the purpose of obtaining for himself or for others an unlawful gain,(1) Appropriates any tangible object belonging to any other person and which is in his custody, in circumstances other than those covered by section 277 of this Act; or

(2) Refuses to acknowledge receipt of a pecuniary or any other loan, or of a service for which a remuneration shall be paid;

(3) Unlawfully spends money that has been entrusted to him, even if he was not under an obligation to keep it separate from his own funds;

shall be guilty of embezzlement.(2) The provision in para. 1 of subsection (1) above shall not include dispositions of articles that have been bought and with respect to which the vendor has reserved property until the purchase price has been paid.

§279

Any person who, for the purpose of obtaining for himself or for others an unjustified gain, by unlawfully bringing about, corroborating or exploiting a mistake, induces any person to do or omit to do an act which involves the loss of property for the deceived person or for others affected by the act or omission, shall be guilty of fraud.

§279a Any person who, for the purpose of obtaining for himself or for others an unjustified gain, unlawfully changes, adds or erases information or programs for the use of electronic data processing, or who in any other manner attempts to affect the results of such data processing, shall be guilty of computer fraud.

§280

Any person who, for the purpose of obtaining for himself or for others an unlawful gain, involves some other person in a loss of property,

(1) By abusing an authority conferred on him to act with legal effect on behalf of the latter;

(2) By acting against the interests of the person concerned in respect of property held in trust by him on behalf of that person;

shall, provided the case is not covered by sections 276-279a of this Act, be guilty of breach of trust.

§281

Any person who –

(1) For the purpose of obtaining for himself or for others an unlawful gain, threatens some other person with violence, substantial damage to goods or deprivation of liberty, with making a false accusation of having committed a punishable act or dishonourable conduct or with revealing matters appertaining to his private life; or who

(2) Threatens some other person with denouncing or revealing a punishable act, or with making true accusations of dishonourable conduct for the purpose of obtaining for himself or for others a gain which was not justified by the action which was the reason for the threat;

shall, provided the case is not covered by section 288 of this Act, be guilty of extortion.

§282

Any person who takes advantage of another person’s serious economic or personal difficulties, lack of knowledge, irresponsibility or existing state of dependence in order to obtain or stipulate in a contract any payment which is out of all proportion to the return, or for which no payment is due, shall be guilty of usury.

§283

(1) Any person who, for the purpose of obtaining for himself of for others an unlawful gain,

(1) Sells, pawns, mortgages or in any other way disposes of property belonging to him, but on which a third party has acquired a right with which the act is incompatible; or

(2) Subsequent to the institution of bankruptcy proceedings against him or to the commencement of negotiations to agree on a composition, undertakes acts aimed at withdrawing from creditors the property and interests in the estate; or

(3) By false pretences, concealment, abuse of contractual forms, substantial gifts, excessive consumption, sales at cut prices, payments of or deposit of guarantee for debts not due or in any other similar manner withdraws his property or interests from his creditors or from any one of them;

shall be guilty of misappropriation of funds.

(2) If acts of the nature indicated in para. 3 of subsection (1) above have been undertaken for the benefit of a creditor, the latter shall be liable to punishment only if, at the time when be foresaw the imminence of bankruptcy or the suspension of payments by the debtor, he induced the debtor to grant him such facilities.

§284

Any person who accepts or obtains for himself or for others a share in profits acquired by theft, unlawful detention of objects found, embezzlement, fraud, computer fraud, breach of trust, extortion, misappropriation of funds or robbery, and any person who, by hiding the articles thus acquired, by assisting in selling them or in any other similar manner helps to ensure for the benefit of another person the profits of any of these offences, shall be guilty of receiving.

§285

(1) The offences referred to in sections 276, 278-281 or 283 of this Act as well as receiving in connection with such offences or with robbery or usury shall be punished with imprisonment for any term not exceeding one year and 6 months. In the circumstances dealt with in section 283 (2) of this Act, the penalty in respect of the debtor as well as of the creditor who has benefited may be reduced to simple detention.

(2) Misappropriation of objects found and receiving in connection with such offences shall be punished with a fine or simple detention or imprisonment for any term not exceeding one year and 6 months.

§286

(1) If the theft is of a particularly aggravated nature, for example because of the manner in which it was committed, or because it was committed by several persons in association, or because weapons or any other dangerous instruments were brought along, or because of the high value of the objects stolen, or the conditions under which they were kept, or where a large number of thefts has been committed, the penalty may be increased to imprisonment for up to 4 years.

(2) The penalty for embezzlement, fraud, computer fraud, breach of trust, or misappropriation of funds may, where the offence is of a particularly aggravated nature or where a large number of such offences has been committed, be increased to imprisonment for up to 8 years.

(3) The penalty of extortion, usury or receiving may, under similar circumstances, be increased to imprisonment for up to 6 years.

§287

(1) If any of the offences dealt with in sections 276-284 of this Act is of minor importance because of the circumstances under which the punishable act was committed, because of the small value of the objects appropriated or of the loss of property sustained or for any other reason, the penalty shall be a fine. In further mitigating circumstances, the penalty may be remitted.

(2) Attempt at a crime covered by subsection (1) above shall be punishable.

§288

(1) Any person who, for the purpose of obtaining for himself or for others an unlawful gain, by violence or threat of immediate application of such,(1) Takes or extorts from any other person a tangible object belonging to the latter; or

(2) Carries away any stolen object; or

(3) Forces some other person to commit any act or make any omission involving that person or any other person for whom he is acting in a loss of property;

shall be guilty of robbery and liable to imprisonment for any term not exceeding 6 years.

(2) If the robbery has been carried out in particularly dangerous circumstances or in particularly aggravating circumstances, the penalty may be increased to imprisonment for any term not exceeding 10 years.

§289

Any person who is guilty of tax evasion (see section 13 (1) of the Tax Control Act) of a particularly serious nature shall be liable to imprisonment for any term not exceeding 4 years. A person shall be similarly liable who is guilty of smuggling (see section 123 (1) of the Customs Act) of a particularly serious nature, or who is similarly guilty of a breach of section 123 (3) of the Customs Act.

§290

(1) Any misappropriation of funds that has not involved any right especially protected shall be prosecuted only at the request of the injured party, or if a subsequent execution distraint has failed to satisfy a creditor, if bankruptcy proceedings have been instituted, if negotiations to agree on a composition have been commenced, or if a petition in bankruptcy has been refused owing to insufficiency of the assets of the estate.

(2) In the case of theft, unlawful detention of objects found, embezzlement, fraud, or receiving committed against any near relative of the offender, and in the circumstances dealt with in section 287 of this Act, prosecution may be waived at the request of the injured party.

§300

(1) Any person who,

(1) At a time when he is aware or ought to be aware of his inability to satisfy his creditors seriously aggravates his economic circumstances by incurring new debt, or pays or deposits guarantees for substantial debts that have fallen due; who

(2) Involves his creditors in a substantial loss by extravagant habits, by gambling, by hazardous enterprises which are out of proportion with his economic circumstances, by grave mismanagement of his affairs or by any other careless conduct; or who

(3) In his capacity as debtor or authorized agent makes incorrect statements when submitting the declarations necessary for the commencement of negotiations to agree on a composition or who is guilty of grave carelessness;

shall be liable to imprisonment for any term not exceeding one year or to simple detention or, in mitigating circumstances, to a fine.

(2) Prosecution shall take place only on the conditions laid down in section 290 (1) of this Act.

§300a Any person who, in circumstances to which the provisions of section 279 of this Act do not apply, intentionally or by gross negligence brings about in an unlawful way that a person, who is under a delusion, because of this acts, or omits to act, thereby causing him or any other person affected by the act or omission, a serious loss of property, shall be liable to a fine, to simple detention or to imprisonment for any term not exceeding 6 months.

§300b Any person who, in circumstances to which the provisions of section 282 of this Act do not apply, by entering into a contract in an improper fashion, takes advantage of the other party’s economic difficulties or otherwise of his inferior position, shall be liable to a fine, to simple detention or to imprisonment for any term not exceeding 6 months.

§300c Any person who transfers a claim which originates from another’s act of the nature described in sections 282, 300a or 300b of this Act, or who advances such a claim, shall, if by virtue of his acquisition of the claim he knew of, or showed gross negligence with respect to its character, be liable to a fine or to simple detention or to imprisonment for any term not exceeding 6 months. A person shall be similarly liable who otherwise intentionally or by gross negligence derives an undue advantage from another’s act of the nature referred to in sections 282, 300a or 300b of this Act.

§303

Any person who is guilty of gross negligence in acquiring by purchase or in receiving in any other similar manner objects acquired through an offence against property shall be liable to a fine or to simple detention. In the case of recidivism or if the offender has been previously convicted of an offence against property, the penalty may be increased to imprisonment for up to 6 months.

Police Background Check Procedures

Who can apply?

• Individuals may apply directly for disclosure or may provide consent to a third party, including a prospective employer.
• Written consent must be provided if going through third party representatives. It must contain:
the type of information required, to whom the information may be provided and for what purpose the information may be used by the designated recipient.

Where?

• Local applicants can apply online (see below).
• External applicants can apply online as well, or contact the Danish National Police (see below).

What must the applicant supply?

• Full name and maiden name (where applicable)
• Place of birth
• Date of birth
• Civil Registration Number/CPR or Personnumer (enclose a copy of passport or photo ID that would contain the CPR)
• Correspondence address to send the certificate to and enclose stamped, self-addressed
envelope
• Signature
• State what language you require the certificate to be in (if convictions exist, it will be in Danish only)
• Last Danish address (external applicants only)
• Fee cheque (where applicable )

What are the costs/turnaround?

• Free of charge when applying in person and turnaround is instant.
• Free of charge when applying by post, aside from postage.
• Turnaround by post to the UK is around a week.
• Authentication fee: DKK 175.00 (approx. GBP£20).
• There is no fast track service.

Contact Details

The application form can be found online:
http://www.politi.dk/NR/rdonlyres/6AD25FE9-F4BA-40D1-853488F230F57433/0/P366_0606.pdf
(Danish language only)
The application form should be completed electronically in block capitals. Applications must be submitted by post, or fax.
Overseas applications
must be sent via e-mail: dataafd@politi.dk

 

Applications must be submitted in writing to the National Commissioner of Police at the address below:
Rigspolitiet
Alfdeling D
Kriminalregisteet
Posboks 93
2650 Hvidovre, Denmark
Royal Danish Embassy
55 Sloane Street
London SW1X 9SR
Tel: 020 7333 0200
Fax: 020 7333 0270
Email: lonamb@um.dk

Denmark – Know Your Customer (KYC) Rules

Denmark is not a major financial center and does not have a serious problem in the area of financial crimes. Money laundering activity is generally from foreign criminal activity and is primarily related to the sale of illegal narcotics, specifically cocaine, heroin and amphetamines. Furthermore, outlaw motorcycle gangs have been involved in a range of offenses, including narcotics-related offenses, smuggling of goods, and various financial crimes. There are no indications of trade-based money laundering as it relates to drug trafficking in Denmark and public corruption is virtually non-existent.

Denmark is geographically vulnerable to serving as a transit country for smuggling into Sweden and Norway.

KNOW-YOUR-CUSTOMER (KYC) RULES:

Enhanced due diligence procedures for PEPs:

A PEP is an abbreviation for Politically Exposed Person, a term that describes a person who has been entrusted with a prominent public function, or an individual who is closely related to such a person. The terms PEP, Politically Exposed Person and Senior Foreign Political Figure are often used interchangeably

    • Foreign PEP: YES
    • Domestic PEP: YES

Denmark – KYC covered entities

The following is a list of Know Your Customer entities covered by Danish Law:

    • Banks, electronic money institutions and currency exchanges
    • Insurance brokers and intermediaries
    • Pension and mutual funds
    • Securities brokers and dealers
    • Portfolio, asset and capital managers
    • Financial leasing and factoring entities
    • Issuers and processors of credit cards, traveler‘s checks, and money orders
    • Accountants and auditors
    • Real estate agents
    • Trust and company service providers
    • Attorneys
    • Real estate agents
    • Casinos

Denmark – Suspicious Transaction Reporting (STR) Requirements:

Number of STRs received and time frame: 2,316 in 2010

Number of CTRs received and time frame: Not applicable

The following is a list of STR covered entities covered by Danish Law:

    • Banks, electronic money institutions and currency exchanges
    • Insurance brokers and intermediaries
    • Pension and mutual funds
    • Securities brokers and dealers
    • Portfolio, asset and capital managers
    • Financial leasing and factoring entities
    • Issuers and processors of credit cards, traveler‘s checks, and money orders
    • Accountants and auditors
    • Real estate agents
    • Trust and company service providers
    • Attorneys
    • Real estate agents
    • Casinos

MONEY LAUNDERING CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS/CONVICTIONS:

Prosecutions: 306 in 2009
Convictions: 158 in 2009

ENFORCEMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES AND COMMENTS:

The Government of Denmark has a comprehensive anti-money laundering/counter-terrorist financing (AML/CFT) regime and has been cooperative with the United States in drug money laundering investigations. Denmark and the United States have a Customs Mutual Assistance Agreement which facilitates information sharing between the customs administrations of the two countries. Denmark should continue to enhance its laws and regulations as necessary to adhere to international standards, including extending its AML/CFT requirements to cover gaming establishments and Internet gaming providers.

Risk

Sovereign risk

The public debt/GDP ratio is low and the budget is estimated to have posted a surplus last year, albeit thanks to temporary revenue measures. In the absence of such measures, The Economist Intelligence Unit expects the budget to swing back into deficit in 2015-16, with the deficit/GDP ratio testing the EU’s 3% ceiling in both years. Funding costs are low and the government has suspended bond issuance to help contain upward pressure on the Danish krone.

Banking sector risk

The 2014 EU-wide asset quality review and stress tests ascertained that Denmark’s four systemically important banks are well capitalised, even under adverse economic and financial conditions. However, many smaller banks have a low return on equity, high costs and high property market exposure.

Political risk

The traditional political consensus on major policy issues has frayed, especially on immigration and welfare. With an election due in September, the centre-left minority coalition will find it hard to pass legislation and implement reforms.

Economic structure risk

Denmark runs a hefty current-account surplus, but weak productivity growth, rising unit labour costs and krone appreciation in trade-weighted terms have eroded competitiveness. High levels of household debt accumulated as a result of the housing bubble of 2005-07 will take many years to unwind. In the absence of bold reforms to raise the labour supply, population ageing will lead to a deterioration of Denmark’s public finances in the medium to long term.

Travel Risk

Security

The decision to travel is your responsibility. You are also responsible for your personal safety abroad. The purpose of this Travel Advice is to provide up-to-date information to enable you to make well-informed decisions.

Crime

Petty crime (such as pickpocketing, luggage snatching and purse snatching) occurs in large cities and in tourist areas, on public transportation and in restaurants, particularly during the tourist seasons (summer months and winter holiday season).

Pickpockets and purse snatchers may work in teams; one distracts the victim and another commits the robbery. Hotel lobbies and restaurants attract professional, well-dressed thieves who do not attract attention. Be vigilant and ensure your personal belongings are secure at all times.

Canadians should be aware that gang-related violence can occur in Nørrebro, an area in the northern part of Copenhagen. Remain vigilant about your surroundings and avoid large unofficial gatherings.

Terrorism

The Danish Security and Intelligence Service maintains a public alert system on terrorism. Consult the website of the Danish Security and Intelligence Service for more information. On February 14, 2015, a gunman fired on a crowd in a café in Copenhagen, killing one person and injuring three police officers. Several hours later, a further shooting resulting in injuries was reported at a synagogue in central Copenhagen. Expect tighter security measures and increased police presence at high profile events or locations. Remain vigilant, keep informed of the current situation, monitor local media and follow the advice of local authorities.

Public Transportation

Bus, train and taxi services are extensive.

Ferry services, available for transport to Denmark’s many islands, may be disrupted during winter due to inclement weather.

See Transportation Safety in order to verify if national airlines meet safety standards.

Cycling

Cyclists are numerous in Danish cities and often have right-of-way over pedestrians and automobiles. In Copenhagen, bicycles may be rented for a small fee but cannot be taken out of the inner-city area.

Motorists should be sure to check bicycle lanes before turning right, and pedestrians should watch carefully for bicycle traffic when crossing the street.

Demonstrations

Demonstrations occur periodically in larger urban centres. Although the demonstrations are usually peaceful, avoid them as a safety precaution.

General safety measures

Exercise normal safety precautions and avoid poorly lit areas at night.

Ensure your personal belongings and passports and other travel documents are secure at all times.

Emergency services

Dial 112 for emergency assistance.

Address Format

RECIPIENT

STREET_NAME HOUSE_NUMBER
POSTAL_CODE LOCALITY [SORTING_CODE]
DENMARK

Sample

Karen Dinesen
Amaliegade 39
1256 KØBENHAVN Ø
DENMARK

Summary

Calendar GMT Reference Actual Previous Consensus Forecast
2014-12-23 08:00 AM Q3 1% 0.3% 0.9% 0.9%
2015-02-27 08:00 AM Q4 1.3% 1% 0.9% 0.79%
2015-03-31 08:00 AM Q4 1.5% 1% 1.3% 1.3%
2015-05-29 08:00 AM Q1 1.5% 0.79%
2015-06-30 08:00 AM Q1 1.5%
2015-08-31 08:00 AM Q2 0.79%

 

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